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Undiagnosed Symptoms Community
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Avatar universal

Is it possible to have hypoglycemic episodes but not be diagnosed with it?

I AM NOT diabetic. I had a really bad episode for the second time back in August, not as bad as my first, but it was bad. And I developed a new symptom; tingling in my hands along with possible color change.
So now my symptoms and signs are severe hunger, nausea, shaking, weakness, headache, pale face, sweating, something almost like hot flashes; I get really hot and then cold, hyperventilating, fatigue, tingling and possible color change in my hands, and dizziness.
My first really bad episode got to the point where I felt like I was floating. I felt really heavy and was starting to hyperventilate. I was very hungry and nauseous. When I walked, I knew I was walking but couldn't feel my feet touching the floor and I remember seeing black coming into my vision from all around, like a vignette. My mom said I was so pale that she thought I had put too light foundation all over my face and lips.
The blood work I had done the week before only showed high cholesterol, my A1C was fine. I used to use a glucose meter (maybe 1-2 years ago)but my levels were all normal and I never had an episode. I spent the day at the Dr's a few weeks before to do testing. I had to fast from midnight the night before to until after the testing was done. My level was fine before they gave me a soda to drink and then it was fine every 3 or 4 or how ever many times after, until my last one. Even the nurse asked how I was feeling because it was low; I don't remember the exact number though; maybe 45-50 . So I went to the endocrinologist and she pretty much chalked it up to me being overweight, I know I am, but she didn't even ask me if I took medications when she asked if I get dizzy when standing. Which I do. She never asked how often it happens, when it happens, if it happens after eating or how long after eating or how long I go without eating before symptoms start. She just printed out pages of different types of diets and glucose meter and sent me on my way. We used the meter until we ran out of the test strips and I never had an episode. That was 1-2 years ago, as I said before. I've had episodes since then, but can't test my levels because we can't afford to buy the strips anymore since insurance doesn't cover things that aren't medically required. I feel lost and hopeless. We've tried everything we can, including diet changes, but the episodes seemed to happen more. (I changed to whole wheat foods.) I have no clue what to do now. I'm developing symptoms now and who knows what the next one might be. A friend mentioned that it could even be something neurological but I've tried researching and I can't find anything. I just want to know what is going on with me.
3 Responses
Avatar universal
I would like to include that I remember testing high when I used the meter at home; I'm wanting to say 100; I had some pasta with dinner that night. When I tested 40-50 at my Dr.'s office, I initially felt fine when the nurse asked but by time she came back to test me again (maybe an hour later) and I was starting to feel light headed, hot, and slightly nauseous and began to shake some. I've never been able to test during an episode, as we can't get any more test strips.
363281 tn?1590104173
Hello~I am so sorry you are having all these miserable symptoms. It sure seems like hypoglycemic attacks to me, you have all the classic symptoms. It is a shame that the test strips are so expensive, I have the same issues.

You said you thought your number was high after eating Pasta, well, after eating pasta and having a reading of 100 is actually very good, in fact, it is still on the low side.

There are actually a few other health issues that can cause the hypoglycemia to present itself in a dramatic way as yours is. One is weak adrenal glands, if they are over-worked due to stress, improper diet, they don't function as well as they should. I would take a good, high potency B vitamin complex, the B vitamins are stress vitamins, and the Pantothenic acid B5, is an adrenal strengthener. Also, eating a tablespoon of Brewers Yeast either sprinkled on pop corn (tastes wonderful) or on top of any salad or food, will help the adrenals and the hypoglycemia, you see, Brewers Yeast has the glucose tolerance factor in it, which again is the B vitamins and the mineral Chromium, both are great for sugar imbalances.

Second, some food allergies or intolerance's can actually cause blood sugar imbalances. Have you ever had any tests for this. The most common allergens are wheat, glutton, beef and eggs. Again, the adrenal glands play a part in the allergies, so, the vitamins will help again as will the brewers yeast.

I am prone to big-time anxiety attacks, these can mimic hypoglycemic attacks or even bring one on. It is possible, you have are having both issues which makes it very hard to determine which is which.

Have you tried seeing a Naturopathic physician? When I lived home in the states, that was my main doctor. They take a lot more time with their patients and really work to get to the root of the problem. I have noticed that many insurance companies are now accepting them as well. Also, a good chiropractor is of big help. They can adjust areas that help strengthen the adrenal glands and other areas, so that, with the proper diet and good doctor, puts the patient on the road to recovery.

I hope you get the help you need soon. God bless you.
1 Comments
Thank you so much. I'm starting to look into other options for help and causes as well. I too have anxiety and panic attacks. They usually are vastly different.
1530171 tn?1448129593
Yes, very much so!

Have your thyroid levels* checked, because it could work against you like two edged sword!

1.Low thyroid function, can cause hypoglycemia, by slowing cellular glucose uptake, lowering glucose absorption in the gut and other mechanisms.

2.On the other hand hypoglycemia can cause low Thyroid function in the following manner:
Low blood sugar causes an increase of Cortisol (it's a fight or flight stress situation) which in turn causes more glucose to be available for the brain and muscles.
Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia and the resulting frequent spikes of Cortisol release, unfortunately can cause Lowered Pituitary function, which directly affects Thyroid function and more!  

* You should ask for Free T3, Free T4, Reverse T3, anti-TPO and anti-TG  for the time being.
Meanwhile, modify your diet, toward low carb, low glycemic index foods, but more frequent nutritious smaller meals.
Take out any junk foods,sweets, sodas etc.
Eat only for health, not just for pleasure.

In case you feel you need something fast, have a piece of fruit, like a piece of apple, or banana while your body is adjusting to your dietary changes
Adding  virgin coconut oil to your daily diet, will give your body energy without any insulin load and almost zero oxidation. It might be also the preferred fuel for the brain.

You ought to be careful to avoid metabolic syndrome.
You already have some of the signs!

Save up to buy some testing strips. They're what, $15-$20 for 100 strips?
You really need to do this!
Keeping the glucose reading below 100, 1-2 hours after  meals should be your target.

Unfortunately, your doctors are functioning like pre-programmed robots!  
It is unfortunate that someone in their hands and under their care, would be left to develop, diabetes, hypothyroidism, metabolic syndrome, without any regard whatsoever! Just because the Labs don't indicate anything that calls for immediate action (like more meds, but only when the diagnosis finally arrives)

If you go ahead with the thyroid tests, let me know the results. It's likely your Endo will just follow his/her conventional protocol, without much consideration for anything else.

I would suggest 4 x cortisol saliva testing, but that would likely be outside insurance coverage.

Let me know if you need any further details.

Best wishes,
Niko

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