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533880 tn?1237612452

colon cancer and health problems

Back about 5 years ago I was put in the hospital for e-coli and almost died. I have had many problems with my health since then. I underwent a lower gi and found polyps in my colon by they were not cancerous and it also said I have pre crohns, and at the time I had h pylori which was never treated until a few weeks ago. I have a question with all these issues does these things increase my risk of colon or stomach cancer. My grandmother died a month ago due to colon and lover cancer. And my dad has also had a few polyps removed from his colon. What are some things I should be aware of just in case.
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Avatar universal
Hi,

H pylori does increase the risk for cancers in the stomach. Eradication however, is feasible for this risk factor so this is a good thing. The presence of Crohn’s disease also increases risk and is a function of duration of illness. If you only have pre-Crohn’s features, then this situation may not increase the risk as much. If your grandma got colon cancer after her 60th birthday, this is usually a sporadic case more than a hereditary case. Since you have polyps, it would be good to keep to the schedule of follow-up. Aside from this, maintaining a proper diet and exercise would be good for cancer and for general health as well. Discuss your concerns with your doctor. Stay positive.
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533880 tn?1237612452
If I have "pre Crohns's" will I sooner or later develop full Crohn's? My grandmother was diagnosed with colon cancer when she was 59, she would be 60 next month. But with the Crohns I had another grandmother and uncle die from it. I was told that my uncle was the youngest child in the US to develop it, there where no medicines to help him.
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