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Kidney stones

I have had numerous kidney infections and stones over the past few years.  I had a stent recently put in because of a narrowing at the UPJ.  I am having alot of pain from the stent.  My Uro. said before he put the stent in that I would be able to resume a normal life while the stent is in place.  I have frequency, I have to go about 30 times in a 24 hr. period and I am taking ditropan xl 5mg.  I am also on pryidium plus 2x's a day.  I am very uncomfortable besides the constant urge to go I have to strain while going.  I have alot of blood in my urine.  It also feels like their is something sharp in my bladder stabbing me.  My uro. does not seem concerned and says I can continue a normal life and should be able to work without any problems.  Is this feeling normal?  The pain is very much interfering with my life.  Thank you for any help you can give me.  Sue
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Avatar universal
Dear Sue,

Your problem can be a frustrating one.  The symptoms you are experiencing are caused by the ureteral stent inside.  The stent can be very irritating to the bladder as the tip of the stent moves around the surface of the bladder, causing urinary frequency, urgency, pain, and blood in the urine.  A simple X-ray of the abdomen can be obtained to check  the position of the stent to make sure that it has not migrated down from the kidney into the bladder, which can aggravate your symptoms.  If it has moved down, your urologist may choose to replace the stent.   Additionally,  it is best to have the stent removed as soon as your medical condition allows to prevent the risk of introducing infection into the upper urinary tract.
Until your kidney stones and the UPJ obstruction are treated, you may require the stent in for a long time to prevent obstruction of that kidney.  There are different forms of treatment for stones including shock wave therapy (Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy, or ESWL), percutaneous removal of stones under endoscopic guidance, alkalinzation of the urine, and stone basketing.  The UPJ obstruction can likewise be surgically corrected.

This information is provided for general medical education purposes only. Please consult your physician for diagnostic and treatment options pertaining to your specific medical condition. More individualized care is available at the Henry Ford Hospital and its urban campuses by calling (1-800-653-6568).

Sincerely,
HFHS M.D.-TP
*Keyword:stent

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