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kidney surgery


Posted by Peggy on May 25, 1999 at 09:55:21
Just a "Thank You" to the doctors on this forum for putting my mind at ease before going in for my open kidney surgery to remove kidney stones that were in the pockets in my kidney. The doctors removed 1/3rd of my right kidney and I'm doing fine(except for the stent that i still have in it's irritating) The incision is only 6 1/2 inches long. If anyone else is having this surgery,theycan e-mail me and I will be happy to tell them my experience with this surgery. Once again thank you! You've been very helpful. In fact I found out one of my urologists did his residency at Henry Ford!

Posted by Forum Administration on May 25, 1999 at 18:37:53
Dear Peggy,
Thank for the follow-up. I am glad that things went well with your procedure and that we could help you-out.
Sincerely,
Forum Administration

Posted by CONFECTIONER SHIAVAK S on June 01, 1999 at 03:23:42
MY FATHER WHO IS 74 YRS. IS TO GO IN FOR OPEN SURGERY FOR REMOVAL OF KIDNEY STONE. i WOULD LIKE TO KNOW SOME MORE ABOUT THE PROCEDURE AND POST OPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS (IF ANY) AND CARE OF THE PATIENT. ALSO WHAT DIET SHOULD HE FOLLOW NOW (2 MONTHS PRIOR TO SURGERY) AND AFTER SURGERY FOR THE STONE NOT TO RECUR. WOULD BE GRATEFUL FOR SOME HOPE.

Posted by HFHS M.D.-CK on June 02, 1999 at 17:50:52
Dear Confectioner,
Open surgery for kidney stone disease is rare.  Currently ESWL(extracorporeal shock wave lithotrypsy), ultrasound, and laser are used to break up stones without an incision.  Ureteroscopy and stone basketing without an incision is also commonly performed.  Although risks are involved, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (removing a stone through a large tube in the flank) is less invasive than open surgery.
Open surgery involves risks of bleeding and postoperative leakage of urine.  Risks of anesthesia and major surgery include heart attacks, strokes, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, and even death.  Diet after stone treatment includes increasing fluid intake.  Based on the stone type and metabolic work-up other dietary recommendations can be made.
This information is provided for general medical information purposes only. Please consult  your physician for diagnostic and treatment options pertaining to your specific medical condition. More individualized care is available through our department at the Henry Ford Hospital  and its suburban locations (I-800-653-6568).
Sincerely;
HFHS M.D.-CK
  * Keyword: open stone surgery


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