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Women's Health: Postpartum Community
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Avatar universal

Breast Feeding

I will be 36 weeks this Friday and I am wanting to breast feed, but my question is can I breast feed seeing that I have had a breast augmentation?  When I had the surgery, which was 6 years ago, the doctor told me if I was to ever have children that I could breast feed and it would not harm the baby or affect me at all.  I decided to go with the saline filled breast implants rather than the silicone.  I haven't had any problems what so ever, but I am worried about what I have heard.  A friend of mine told me that her friend had a breast augmentation before she got pregnant and when she decided to breast feed, b/c of the scar tissue it hurt her real bad everytime she would breast feed...which she could only handle for about three months.  I am just scared to death about pain, but I guess all I can do it try.  I just wanted other opinions if you have had breast augmentation and have breast feed or if you know of anyone who has. Thanks!
9 Responses
Avatar universal
I have  friend who successfully bf after implants. I'm not sure what kind she had though. Just remember pain in the first 2 weeks is normal and expected. Good luck to you!
Avatar universal
I've known a few ladies who had breast augmentations too and their doctors told them its ok to breast feed too. Only one of them had a baby so far since their operations, but she decided to go on the overly-cautious side and not breast feed. Maybe someone else can help you more than I can.
I am pregnant now and reading up on breast feeding too. From what I've heard, it hurts for everyone, whether you've had a breast enhancement or not, for at least a week or so initially.
Good luck and I hope someone else can help you more.
Avatar universal
As the other girls have mentioned breastfeeding can be VERY VERY painful at the beginning, especially with a 1st baby. It's the latching on, for me, that caused the most pain and once my DD got to it, the pain subsided. But, it's that initial jolt of pain that's the worst. It gets better as baby gets the hang of it and you find positions that are comfortable. It's important to know that pain can be normal just so you don't give up thinking that it's the implants that are causing the pain. When in doubt, call a lactation consultant and she will be able to advise you of nursing is in the cards for you. Good luck!
Avatar universal
You BA shouldn't be a problem. Nursing can be uncomfortable at first but it shouldn't be painful. If it is actually painful a lactation consultant can help with the baby's latch and see if you might have thrush which is really common and hurts horribly. Find a consultant you like now so you will be prepared for problems that come up. Of course try breastfeeding and decide based on your own experience, you may find it really easy.
93532 tn?1349374050
From what I understand, nursing after an augmentation is very possible and with saline implants should pose zero health risk. As others mentioned, the first week or so can be somewhat painful as you get used to it. I had a good latch right off the bat with my first, but it still hurt like heck but as soon as I hit day 7, the pain vanished. Had I not been warned about the pain lasting only a week, I may have given up and gone the easy route. But I kept a little countdown in my head and sure enough at 7 days it was better. And while it can be painful during the first week, it lasts a few seconds each session, long enough to let down and than the pain subsides.

Andi

Avatar universal
Thank you all so much for your advice.  Even though people have told me it hurts I am still going to try no matter what.  I will look into a lactation consultant and my friends if I need any help.  Several of them have offered help if I need it, so I am not going to be shy about it...its natural!  But thanks again.  I hope she gets here soon!  Wish me luck!  This is my first.
93532 tn?1349374050
Nothing can replace that bond and I tell everyone I know to at least try. One tip I saw said to set little goals, " I will try and nurse a week...than a month...than 3 months, etc." I went on to nurse my first for 14 months and my second for 15 months. Despite having nursed two boys with full sets of teeth by the time they weaned, it was still the most rewarding experience. With anything there will be ups and downs, take it one day at a time and you will be fine ; )

Andi
Avatar universal
i am breastfeeding and I agree its kinda painful.  I'm not feeling it much because my baby wont feed unless i have a breastshield.  Anyone know what Im doing wrong?  Sorry for asking question over yours.
Avatar universal
I know how you feel. My baby is going on 4 months and I never thought I'd get this far. I had extreme pain far longer than the discomfort of the "first week or so" that usually occurs. There are many reasons you could be having pain, not just latch. See a lactation consultant before you give up.

After 2 LC appointments and several OB/GYN visits I cleared up my problem with thrush that kept reoccuring for the first 3 months. It was so painful I dreaded feeding my baby and dreamed of offering the bottle (which I did at one point to get a break and just pumped for a day - it made me realize exactly how much I really did want to nurse her and not just feed her breast milk). I also found out she has a bubble palate which can cause pain when your doing everything right.

Thankfully it has all gotten better as she has gotten older. Andi is so right when she said make small goals. I wouldn't never thought I'd make it to 6 months but now I wouldn't dream of stopping when I do make it until then.

If you want to post your specific issues too I'll try to help - I have several knowledgable sources and friends for advice with specific symptoms. As in what kind of pain, when and how long does it occur, how old is baby, how often and long does baby nurse, etc? Sometimes it's necessary to write a book to get the info across :).
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