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Women's Health: Postpartum Community
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Avatar universal

How soon can we try again after miscarriage

I have recently miscarried at 8.5 weeks although the doctor said it was probably only a 6-7 wk pregnancy. I had no D&C and it was all over (physically) in less than a week.

I am finding it really difficult to get consistent advice on when we can try again...ranging from after my first cycle to 6 months.

Given my specific details, when can we start to try again without significantly increasing our chances of this happening again?

What I'm interested in is the medical/physical side as I feel my husband and I are in the best position to judge emotionally, when we are ready.

Thankyou
Kerry
22 Responses
Avatar universal
I can only tell you what one of my doctors told me when they thought I was having a normal miscarriage (it ended up to actually be an ectopic pregnancy, but that's another story).  She asked me my age (I'm 36) and she said that I only had to wait one full cycle before trying again.  She didn't tell me why she asked my age...maybe older patients have to wait a little longer.  One of the nurses said 2 months, but the doctor said one month, so if it had been a normal M/C I would have gone with that.  At that point, though, no D & C had been done yet (I had one in the office without anesthesia a few days later because my own doc wanted to finally rule out an ectopic once and for all...).  But one thing to remember is that it can take a while to get your first period, which is normal.

In my case though as far as the ectopic goes, I have to wait two full cycles (so 3 periods).  And that is after major surgery (laparotomy) and removal of part of the left tube.  So I would think that if after having major abdominal surgery I only have to wait 2 cycles, you would probably be safe with waiting one.  BUT...you really need to ask explicitly.  If you can't get the doc on the phone, ask one of the nurses you feel you can get a good answer from.

My problem is in terms of whether or not what I am experiencing right now is actually a period...I keep getting bright red blood and then the next time I go to the bathroom it is dark brown and scant.  I can't make heads or tails of it.  It is supposed to be much heavier and more painful (this one is much more painful so that's a sign that it is actually my first period, but it certainly isn't steady at all).  I don't want to assume this is my period if it isn't and not wait long enough...but the nurse I spoke to told me to assume it is.

Let me know what your doctor says and good luck.

Lisa
Avatar universal
Thankyou, it is great to get another view on this.

Actually my own doctor said wait 3 months (and was adament), however, the doctor I saw at the  emergency department when it was all happening siad one cycle. Another doctor I know (sister of a friend and a recent miscarrier herself) said there's no medical reason to wait, your body will be ready before you heart - just wait one cycle. So you can see where the inconsistency is coming from!

Basicly we're trying to get as many opinions as possible before making up our minds, but it's not proving easy!

I'm sorry to hear about your loss, I'm afraid I know nothing about the bleeding patterns you are descibing. Sorry I can't be of more help.
Avatar universal
I had a D&C done on April 28 of this year for a blighted ovium--my doctor said to try to wait at least one cycle--unfortantly I got married during this time and had a honeymoon which in deed I got pregnant again before I even had a period. My doctor said that your body knows when things are right and you will get pregnant when your body is ready to handle it again. I am now 10 weeks along and have had no troubles. To be on the safe side my doctor put me on progestrone to help with the lining of the uterus--In my option if you feel that you are ready to try again then go for it.
Avatar universal
Sounds good to me!!!

Thankyou
Kerry
Avatar universal
Kerry, the only thing that I think you should think about is that your doctor is adamant about you waiting 3 months to conceive.  I personally (and obviously this is not my advice to you, this is just what I feel myself) wouldn't be able to go to the same doctor if he said 3 months and I got pregnant in 1.  In fact, my doctor got panicked a few days ago when I told him I knew I was already ovulating (I was only keeping track to get a good idea of my body's rhythm so when it is time to try again, all my ducks are in a row, so to speak).  I assured him that I was completely on the same page as him as far as waiting to try again.  But to be fair, my body has been through the wringer in terms of surgery.  I am in NO way saying that what I went through was worse than you or anything like that.  I am just saying that after surgery so many things have to get taken into account.

Would you be comfortable asking your doctor why he wants you to wait three months...maybe if you open up those lines of communication you can get an idea of why he wants that so badly.  You can say that you have heard from "friends" or whatever you want to say who were in the same boat that their doctors said one month was fine...

I just want you to not be put in the situation where you come in in a few weeks with a positive pregnancy test and your doctor is stunned and you feel uncomfortable by it.

Did I explain that well enough...I don't want you to think I am telling you what to do...I just know my personality is such that if a doctor says wait, then I wait...or you could eliminate the problem if you want by switching to a different doctor.

Good luck, whatever you decide.

Lisa
Avatar universal
In my post I wasnt meaning that you should go against the advice of your doctor--I was just letting you know that there is a brighter side of getting or not getting a period soon after a D&C--That a pregnacy can be a healthy one. Every person and situation is different. A doctors view is sometimes generic based on the patients he has seen in the past--not you in general. Deep down only you know whats right for yourself.
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