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316015 tn?1216733431

I think my cervix hates me! (Question about induction)

At my 36 week appt. when my doc checked me I was about 1cm dilated and 50% effaced. Last Wednesday, he checked me again when I was in the hospital for kidney stones and I was only a fingertip dilated and 60% effaced. Well, today at my appt. he checked me again and said my cervix is closed, no dilation 70% effaced. What? My dilation is going backwards?
Well, they schedualed me to be induced next Tuesday at 7am. I am pretty sure if I am not dilated then they can't get that hook in there to break my water. My question is, if I don't dilate before then, is there a way they can manually dilate me so they can break my water, or will they have to automatically start me on pitocin? My first delivery was super fast, and I'm sure if they are able to break my water, things would progress. Of course I should have asked the doc, but for some reason I never think of my questions until after I have already left.
Thanks in advance!
21 Responses
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328630 tn?1213620350
If your not dialated at all they use something called cytotex I belive to thin the cervix then they start pictiocin , but be in for a longggg processs with a happy ending
Helpful - 0
161938 tn?1212169149
the ladies here jumped on me last week but I will tell you my OPINION  (OPINION is the word here)
1.  I suggest putting several capsules of evening primrose oil in your vagina nightly - this will help ripen your cervix
2.  If you are that effaced  - they will most likely induce you
3.  probably a pitocin drip - generally as soon as you start the drip you start to dilate - they will wait till you are probably a 10 to break your waters
as soon as they broke mine I had the baby

best of luck - you will hear lots of opinions on here so be sure to askyour doc about his experience!
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316015 tn?1216733431
I will find out for sure what is going to happen Tuesday. I am really excited, but nervous at the same time!!

What is evening primrose oil?
Helpful - 0
145992 tn?1341345074
I was about 1 cm and 50% effaced for like 3 weeks.  They gave me cytotec, which is a pill they insert in your cervix to soften it.  Then they give you the pitocin.  Since you are already at 70% effacement most likely they will just start you on pitocin.  But I didn't even need the pitocin, once they inserted just one pill, my body worked on it's own and I dilated extremely quickly.  My labor was very, very fast.  In total 7 hours, which sounds like a lot but given that it was my first baby and they had to induce me, that's a pretty short amount of time.  I went from 4 cm dilated to 9 cm in an hour.  So sometimes being induced doesn't take forever...but everyone's body is different.  I would consult your doctor before using primrose oil.  Actually you should talk to peekawho, she is a labor and delivery nurse.  Good luck and remember you can go into labor any minute.
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316015 tn?1216733431
The reason they are inducing me is to make sure I am at the hospital when I have her. I dilated very quickly too (4cm to 8cm in less than 5 minutes). I had about 2 hours of labor total. Now we live further away from the hospital and I have been having some really messed up dreams about not making it in time and having her in wierd situations. If the primrose oil will help me go into labor, I don't think that I want to use it.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Aw, my cervix was mean to me too!  Made me smile the way you put it,  You are probably just open a little, I don't think you can close back up.  My cervix was high and way far back, hard to reach even in labor and the nurses were all different, and they were not as generous as my Dr. ,so it kinda depends too.  If you went fast with baby #1, it may very well go fast again.  I was at a 3 and about 50% effaced and contracting well with my first and still needed to get induced to help me along.  They could not reach my water still and gave me some cytotec to help soften more.  The next morning my water broke on it's own and they began pitocin, would have done so anyway as my pattern was good and closer.  Took 38 hours with Carson.  I just knew I would go in on my own with baby #2, but again was induced and stuck at a 3.  I was put on pitocin right away as they had a hard time reaching my water.  Dr. swore I was at a 3 and was about 75% effaced.  I took to the pitocin fast again and had to have it turned down, I still sat at a 3, finally made it to a 4 after most of the day.  My Dr. came in to check me, as I laid in tears, knowing they would tell me I was at a 4, no progress and would need a C-section.  I didn't think much about the buzzing feeling in my tailbone, but it was pressure.  Cam was crowning and making his way out when she looked.  Took me over 11 hours, much faster, but I was at a 4 still about an hour prior.  Second babies tend to go faster.  I bet if they need to dialate you a little more, they may use some pitocin, but if they can get in there and break your water right away, they probably will.  Once they break your water it's so much faster, have not heard of them waiting till you are at a 10, but each Dr. is different.  Good luck!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Primrose oil is dangerous, particularly if you use the plant and not the refined oil.  It can cause death.

Unless you are sufficiently ready, pitocin can fail, and you won't like the character of the contractions (sharp, hard, too close together).  There are things that happen early in a natural labor that make it work, like the baby's head registering correctly so he or she can be pushed out.  Once the induction process is begun, especially if the amniotic sac is ruptured, there is no turning back; pitocin has to be cranked up if necessary, and it may require an unplanned C-section.  

You know, induction is so 1950s, anyway.    
Helpful - 0
176741 tn?1295233989
I just hope your doctor is very sure you are ready to be induced next Tuesday.  My doctor was always calculating the 'Bishop' score-using the number from effacement and dilation-to help predict if my body was favorable for induction.  As mrwjd said, if you are not physically ready, a c-section will be in your future.  I'm not against induction, just be sure you truly are ready for it.  Just scheduling a day doesn't always mean you're ready.

Good luck to you.
Helpful - 0
161938 tn?1212169149
sorry
please ask your doctor before youuse eveing primrose oil
it is sold at kroger or any local grocer
DEFINITELY askyour DOC first - my doc said "all it does is "soften" your cervix. IT WILL NOT make you go into labor if your body is not ready"  now that is my doctor - yours may say something completely different
Helpful - 0
537497 tn?1292553056
This may sound weird but I had the same problem and my doctor recommended that me and my husband have sex. I guess the sperm acts as a natural cervix softner.. I thought she was crazy, but it worked.. and I also did a lot of walking.. in two days my cervix opened to 4 cm.. Like I said it sounds crazy but it works!! my husband and I would joke around and he would tell me it was time to get my precription filled.. I didn't find it funny at the time, but looking back, it's pretty funny..
Well good luck and I hope your inducing doesn't take forever!!
Helpful - 0
145992 tn?1341345074
I too had a lot of sex by the end.  My fiance was so excited because I didn't want to have sex my entire pregnancy.  I would do it every few weeks.  Poor guy.  So at the end I was only doing it to get my son out...no real enjoyment...my fiance did not care, he was just happy to be getting some...lol.  I heard about it acting like a natural cervix softener as well but it really didn't help me much.  Oh well.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I was induced on Tuesday at 7am.  My cervix was soft, 80% effaced and I was 0 cm dilated.  They started my on pitocin and by 2pm I was dilated to 3cm and the doctor was able to break my water and I had my baby girl 11h later.  They do have ways to "ripen" your cervix before using pitocin but its not always necessary and your doctor will be able whats best in your case.
Helpful - 0
316015 tn?1216733431
Thank you everyone! I am just scared of Pitocin, because I have heard it makes your contractions way worse and harder to deal with, and I am doing this without meds. I was with my niece when my great-nephew was born and all they had to do for her was break her water, and he was born a few hours later. I am hoping thats what they are able to do for me, so I can avoid Pitocin if at all possible.
As for the sex thing, I have wanted it so much lately that DH can't handle it. He says "what? do you think I'm 16 again?" Another sign that men are no match for our preggo hormones I guess. ;-)
Thanks again ladies!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I admit I have never been a fan of induction.  I was around during the first induction-for-convenience era, and the Chicago studies that put an end to it.  The scandal then was that all women who might deliver over the weekend were induced on Friday for the doctor's convenience, hardly a considered medical opinion, so the ensuing problems were particularly egregious.

I am told it's all different now, but we old folks are slow to adjust.  Thirteen years ago, the obstetrician induced my daughter early so her birth wouldn't conflict with the birth mother's college exams (but mostly because she was sick of being pregnant--who isn't?), and she seems to have come out fine despite the 45-second loss of heartbeat on the lead during the big contractions.

Hypocrisy confession:  I had told doctor and birth mother I didn't prefer induction, but I admitted it was none of my business.  Then, hypocritically, I told them that if they were determined, would they switch the scheduled date from Dec. 2 to Dec. 1 so she would be born on my grandmother-and-best-friend's birthday, which she was.        
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Avatar universal
My 1st induction began with the placement of prostaglandin gel in the cervix and I waited 6 hours to be checked and it still wasn't sufficiently soft so another dose of prostaglandin was give and a few hours later my water broke and they started pitocin. It was a VERY long process and I had my baby 32 hours later.

My 2nd induction was quite long too but I was dilated 1cm and my cervix was pretty soft so my water's were broken immediately and pitocin was started.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
"do have ways to "ripen" your cervix before using pitocin"
"They gave me cytotec, which is a pill they insert in your cervix to soften it."
"placement of prostaglandin gel in the cervix and I waited 6 hours to be checked and it still wasn't sufficiently soft so another dose of prostaglandin was give"
____

It seems from this forum that induction is the norm again, this time with new fillips.

I admit to being boggled at the layers of interventions piled on, when one fails, to this particular attempt to defeat nature.  An unready cervix has always been a contraindication to induction; now, apparently, it's just another obstacle to be chemically reprogrammed.  It seems the interference with natural labor goes upstream as far as necessary to induce every part of the process to move ahead of schedule.

The bizarre thing is that this is not in the service of saving lives or improving quality of life, but in the service of convenience.  With today's lung function tests, they probably don't induce babies who turn out to be unready to survive outside the womb as often any more.  It is just possible, though, that a baby isn't coming out of the oven because he or she isn't finished baking.  

Y'know, a lot of the cervix preparation is triggered by indicators the fetus produces when he or she is ready to go ahead with being born.  It doesn't seem very respectful of the baby, not to mention Mother Nature, to ignore his or her needs.

There ARE doctors who eschew this cavalier induction of labor, particularly when it comes to their own families.  Our pediatrician let his wife go 28 days post-mature rather than induce.  My daughter's obstetrician, whose patients are largely doctors like her or doctors' wives and are "really busy," handles their insistence on efficiency by telling them "if he isn't born by __, we'll induce," which gives them a fixed end date (Type A's crave certainty) .  I have observed that almost all of them have delivered by their date, they're happy, and he hasn't had to argue the risks and benefits with them.

Just my opinion.  Don't mean to offend.
Helpful - 0
316015 tn?1216733431
My induction isn't for my convience or the doctors. It's to make sure that I am at the hospital when I deliver and not one that delivers on the side of the road on the way there. I understand there are risks with being induced, especially when I am not dilated, but I would rather take those risks and know that we are safe at the hospital.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I'm sorry if I offended.  This decision is high on the list of choices that are yours alone, and none of my or anyone else's business.
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176135 tn?1314752638
I began the induction process (gently with small doses of cytotec) five days before my due date because I had gestational diabetes.  I was against induction and did everything I could to go into labor naturally in the week prior, but when the cytotec inductions didn't kick start labor and I was asking if I could just go home and wait some more, the midwife told me that even with well-controlled gd, the baby was at risk if I went over my due date.  With that concern, I was glad to continue the induction.  Plus, it turns out I had scar tissue in my cervix, and it took seven doses of cytotec over four days to get past 1.5 cm.  My friend had the same scarring problem, and when she was induced at 2 weeks overdue, they didn't give her cytotec, she never dialated, and wound up with a c-section.  So the cervical ripening process was a blessing in my case, and my healthy dd finally arrived- three hours before her due date.  I agree that induction for the mother or doctor's convenience is irresponsible, but in certain situations induction is the best decision to make.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Of course.  It's none of my business, but if it were, I'd absolutely support medical intervention in medical necessity.  Not even an emergency, but any time it improves rather than diminishes the likelihood of a positive outcome!
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316015 tn?1216733431
I wasn't offended. I don't believe in induction for convenience. The reason we are inducing is because with my first I dilated from 4 to 8cm in less than five minutes, and about two minutes later was pushing. It took less than 10 minutes of pushing before she was born. Before that, I went in and they said I was not in labor and sent me home, and I ended up back at the hospital less than an hour later. They say subsequent labors are usually faster. They are also worried about hemmorhaging (sp?) which they said goes along with fast labors sometimes.
I actually don't like the idea of medical intervention all that much. I am doing it drug free, and wouldn't be allowing an IV if it weren't for the risk of hemmorhaging. Just want you to know I appreciate EVERYONES opinions, thoughts, and experiences, so thank you to everyone that took the time to give them!
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