Aa
A
A
A
Close
Women's Health Community
65.6k Members
Avatar universal

No cycle and no answers

I apologize if this belongs more in the Gynecology section, but I was redirected to here by the site.

I'll try to keep this somewhat brief. I'm 23 and have never had a period on my own. At age 19 I started taking medroxyprogesterone every 4 months, so every 4 months up until February 2007 I had a period. I never had any problems until the end of 2006; the last 3 times I took the pills, I would have chest pain, leg pain, racing heart, and extreme fatigue. This would usually last the first 2-3 days of taking it, then the rest of the 10 day medication cycle those symptoms would fade away for the most part. Doctors have asked why don't I take BC pills, but if I had such a bad reaction to the progesterone, wouldn't be just as dangerous to take BC?

I've seen a OB/GYN, my primary doctor, and an endocrinologist. My hormones have been checked, my thyroid has been checked 3 times, and I've been tested for Cushings. All have come back normal. Doctors have suggested PCOS (I am very heavy and can't get control of my weight, no cycle, some extra hair growth) but nothing has been a set diagnosis. The endrocrinologist wants me to start taking Metformin not for diabetes but for treatment of the period/weight issues.

I'm just so frustrated. I don't know what's wrong with me and I'm scared. I'm scared that I'll never be able to get my weight under control, I'll never be able to take BC, and that these medicines that are prescribed are going to hurt me in some way.

Do you think it is PCOS or are there other conditions I should be checked for?
Is Metformin a good option for me? It seems like it would be so much easier to take BC to regulate my cycle, but I just think it is too dangerous.

I would also like to mention that my mother, maternal grandmother, and maternal great-grandmother all had cycle issues that somehow magically fixed themselves after they got pregnant. They would go several months without having a cycle, so they were never as bad as me who doesn't have a cycle at all.

Thank you for your time.
3 Responses
Avatar universal

"Doctors have suggested PCOS"

That is what I thought of.... has your endocrinologist checked your testosterone level yet ?


"I would also like to mention that my mother, maternal grandmother, and maternal great-grandmother all had cycle issues that somehow magically fixed themselves after they got pregnant."

And nature / genetics probably passed this on to you !  = )

Avatar universal
Yes, my testosterone level and other hormonal levels have been checked - they all come back normal. Is it normal for a person with PCOS to have normal hormone levels?

I guess I did get lucky on genetics...not! I do know that my great-grandmother had some kind of operation in the early 1900s that finally allowed her to have children. My grandmother's problems were finally attributed to hyperthyroidism - but it wasn't until she was in her 60s. My mom's irregular cycle was never given a diagnosis, she was just told she couldn't have kids (she had 3).

Avatar universal
"Is it normal for a person with PCOS to have normal hormone levels?"

I don't think so. People with polycystic ovary syndrome have a high LH (luteinizing hormone), lower level of FSH and abnormal levels of male hormones, particularly testosterone.

Honestly... if I were in your shoes, I wouldn't take anything medications that my body doesn't want. My opinion.

Best of luck to you !

Have an Answer?
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
From skin changes to weight loss to unusual bleeding, here are 15 cancer warning signs that women tend to ignore.
Here’s what you need to know about the transition into menopause – and life after the change takes place.
It’s more than just the “baby blues.“ Learn to recognize the signs of postpartum depression – and how to treat it.
Forget the fountain of youth – try flossing instead! Here are 11 surprising ways to live longer.
From STD tests to mammograms, find out which screening tests you need - and when to get them.
Find out if PRP therapy right for you.