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Does reduction in LDL/triglycrides reduce artery blockages
I have come to know that maintaining lower levels of LDL and triglycrides can reduce existing artery blockages over a period of time. Lot of such information is available on internet also.

I want to know if someone on this forum or their near and dears one have experienced this???

What should be the levels of cholostrol required to be maintained??

Thanks in advance.
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How did you come to know that existing blockages can be reduced?

From all that I've seen or read or heard, that does not happen.
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I quote from one of the websites,
“With Ornish's experiment a new era was established in the management of coronary heart disease and alternatives to angioplasties and CABGs were available. In 1995, JAMA (Journal of American Medical Association) published results of Dr. Dean Ornish's patients after 5 years of follow-up, which also showed a persistent reversal of coronary blockages. The latest edition of Braunwald's Text Book (1997), the bible of Cardiologists, also clearly talks and recognises the reversal of blockages.  

Dr. Ornish propagated the ancient Indian technology of Yoga for heart disease treatment by publishing a 500-page book, which is now an international best seller. He is now one of the busiest physicians in the USA and also an advisor to the President of USA.”

http://www.saaol.com/ornish.php

I am sure there may be many more??
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There is another one from net:
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“Dissolving the fatty buildups
To reverse atherosclerosis, we must remove the fatty deposits from the arterial walls. This does not have to be done surgically. There is a very simple and very effective nutritional solution. These fatty deposits are directly related to cholesterol. Low density lipoproteins (LDL), also called “bad” cholesterol can be removed even when it has hardened into plaque on the interior of the artery walls. There is a certain digestive enzyme that is made from this very cholesterol. It is called bile. Bile is a digestive enzyme that aids in the breaking down of fats in the intestinal tract. If a person can produce a regular supply of bile, then cholesterol levels will drop as this raw material is converted into a useful tool. However, most people recycle their bile and new bile is not made in amounts sufficient enough to reduce blood cholesterol. Let me explain further.
When a person consumes a meal, the digestive enzyme bile is released into the duodenum, the part of the intestinal tract where the majority of digestion takes place. This bile is used to break down any fatty foods that were eaten. However, we will release more bile than is necessary to break down all the fats and a fairly significant amount of bile will go unused. This bile will be recycled and returned to the liver, where the liver will return it to the gall bladder to be stored until the next meal. The next meal comes and again we have an excess over the need and bile will again be recycled. This pattern can continue to repeat for years.
Now enter into the scene soluble fiber. Soluble fiber binds tightly with bile in the intestinal tract, in fact, so tightly that the bile cannot be reabsorbed through the intestinal tract and return to the liver. Because fiber cannot pass the intestinal barrier, the bile that is bound with the soluble fiber will travel the length of the intestinal tract and be excreted from the body. Now, the liver recognizes that it has no recycled bile to send down to the gall bladder for the next meal. Therefore the liver will be forced to make bile (which it is very capable of doing). Bile is made out of cholesterol and the liver will pull cholesterol out of the blood stream to make this digestive enzyme. Subsequently, cholesterol levels will begin to fall.
Over the course of time, levels will fall to the point of a total cholesterol of 150 or below. Studies show that at a cholesterol level of 150 or below, reversal of atherosclerosis (the fatty buildup on the blood vessel walls) can occur. How does this work? We are not totally sure, however, it is this author’s hypothesis that the liver releases an enzyme at this point of 150 and below that literally dissolves the hardened plaque off the interior of the blood vessel walls, so that the cholesterol is then available in the bloodstream for the liver to utilize in the making of bile. What is so neat about this is that the cholesterol doesn’t come off in big fat globules or pieces that can travel to another part of the body and cause a blockage. It comes off in molecular pieces so small that a blockage cannot occur and yet the liver can pick up these molecular pieces and convert them to bile………………..”

Source: http://www.karenhurd.com/carotidarteryblockage.html
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Very interesting.  I think someone needs to clue the mainstream cardiologists in to this.  Wonder what levels of soluble fiber is needed to get the ball rolling ?

Of course, you can find the same glowing reports about how well chelation therapy works.

All in all, I am skeptical.......but, investigation continues.
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