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Anyone get ANA back in IU/ml instead of ratio (i.e. 1:80, etc) ?
I was wondering how many of you have had your ANA results determined in International Units instead of the historically used ratios (i.e. 1:80, etc). If you have, how has your doctor accepted those results as indicative of rheumatic disease?

I have a history of chronic cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (mainly on ankles these days, comes and goes, but when it first came on 5 years ago it was in other places, too). I have a significant family history for lupus, Sjogrens, etc. and I have a continual problem with hypothyroidism (currently controlled). When the vasculitis first appeared I was tested with all the usual rheumatic labs. My ANA first came back at 1:80 speckled, then 1:40. Everything else was negative.

I haven't been tested for ANA again until just recently because the vasculitis still wants to hang around, although mildly, and I have other skin issues. My PCP wanted to do another to see if anything's changed. This time the ANA, done by Specialty Labs (or at least with their test), came back at 30 IU/ml, speckled. According to their results, the 30 can also be roughly interpreted through traditional ratios as a range from 1:160 to 1:640. In traditional ratios, these numbers would indicate a possible problem, but the 30 seems to basically indicate a low positive without much concern, according to what little literature I could find.

I realize any ANA is only screening and the actual numbers don't mean a lot, but there seems to be some confusion. My dr has requested an ANALyzer panel considering my and my family's history. But has anyone had both the IU and ratio results and found that they were relatively similar, or a large discrepancy?
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434278 tn?1324709825
Look this web site up.
http://www.specialtylabs.com/tests/details.asp?id=1121

I agree w/ your dr.  30 IU/ml is considered significant.  The speckled pattern is the most common and lest specific.  Disorders indicated are: SLE, MCTD, scleroderma, and sjogren's syndrome.  Test for further evaluation are: anti-Sm, anti-RNP, Scl-70 and anti-La.

Lab test are only one piece of the puzzle.  They also connect symptoms along w/ lab results.  
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