Neurology Community
Cervical epidural
About This Community:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

Cervical epidural

Anyone have experience with cervical epidural?  Surgeon wants me to get it since PT did not work for severe disc space narrowing at c5 c6.  Any thoughts?
Related Discussions
3 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Hey there--I have found a good article that will answer your questions.  I had a couple years experience with this type of injection but I was just working in the area of the lumbar spine but same in all respects to the neck injections.  I must say it was highly variable in the outcome of the injections--some would have great relief ---even ling term and others had no effect whatsoever.  You cdan get the injectin about every three months and this is an option evern if the first one does not work.  You will be told of all the risks so I won't go into that but if your INJECTOR has done these for many years you will have minimal risks to worry about.  If you are in that much discomfort i would suggest you try it as it is just another option to get the nerves to settle down and adjust the narrowing that is going on in your vertebrae.  i would also encourage to ask about a trial use of a TENS unit--PT should have given you that option--if not inquire about one for pain relief---I really perscribed lots of them and had great results.

I wish you a good outcome---David

Cervical epidural steroid injections

In this procedure normal saline and a steroid solution are mixed and injected into the cervical epidural space.  The epidural space is a space surrounding the spinal cord membranes within the bony spinal canal.  Of course the cervical epidural space is this section of epidural space that is located in the neck area of the spine.  This is from base of the skull to the level of the shoulders.  This injection is not a spinal block, which is the procedure where local anesthetic is placed within the spinal membranes containing the fluid, cerebral spinal fluid that surrounds the spinal cord.  The spinal injection is an anesthetic technique that is done in the lumbar spine or the back section of the spine do produce anesthesia in the abdomen and lower extremities for surgical procedures as done in an operating room.  Injection into the epidural space is generally performed by a physician who is trained in spinal injections and procedures.  This is generally an anesthesiologist who has interventional pain medicine training as well.  The solution injected as mentioned above, is a special steroid, which is microencapsulated.  That is the compound steroid is surrounded by a compound that makes the molecules of the steroid lasts longer in the epidural space for longer effect.  In other words the body will have a more difficult time removing or clearing this material from the epidural space.  In contrast when a steroid injection is made into a muscle such as the hip or buttock, the molecules of the steroid are not microencapsulated and thus are cleared by the body faster to be distributed all over the body for a generalized effect.  In this spinal injection the goal of the injection is effect only in the area injected such as the cervical epidural space.  The steroid injected into the body generally is a very potent anti-inflammatory drug. The body makes its own steroids naturally as these compounds are hormones and necessary for life.  One of the well-known naturally occurring steroids of the body is cortisone.  The injected steroids are more potent and active than the body's cortisone.  Therefore the injected steroid in the cervical epidural space will produce more potent anti-inflammatory response once injected in this space.  Occasionally a very small amount of local anesthetic such as lidocaine is also injected with the mixture.  This is to reduce abnormality of the function of the nerves in the spinal canal.  Once the mixture of the steroid and local anesthetic in saline is injected in the epidural space, the solution disperses itself in this space to surround the spinal nerve roots, capsules of the spinal joints (known as the facet joints), spinal ligaments and coverings of the bones of the spine (vertebral elements) and the spinal cord coverings known as dural membranes.  As mentioned reduction of the inflammatory changes of these structures reduces pain, reflex spasm of the muscles of the neck, reduce inflammation of the joints and of course the spinal nerves. This injection may be performed in the office setting or done in the ambulatory outpatient setting.  This specialist performing this procedure may use x-ray control to do this procedure.  This procedure can easily be done without x-ray control as well.  X-ray control is known as fluoroscopic guidance or fluoroscopy. This procedure may be done in the sitting, supine or with the patient on his or her side. The patient may or may not be given sedative medication before procedure.  This is generally determined by the physician who performs the procedure after assessing the patient and the patient's ability to tolerate the procedure with or without medication.  The skin and the tissues below the skin are localized with a local anesthetic injection prior to placement of the needle into the epidural space. The interventional pain specialist after evaluation may recommend this procedure which then can be performed.  These injections are done in a series.  Usually 1 injection is done every 2 weeks for a total of 3 to 4 injections.  It is possible that the interventional pain specialist may not recommend a second injection after the first injection be done because of inadequate response.  If this is the case, other procedures or treatments will be recommended which will be more beneficial for the particular condition.  Sometimes a second injection is done despite less than adequate response after the first injection.  This is done because the first injection will produce a certain amount of anti-inflammatory response and a second injection will allow the solution to spread more in the epidural space at produce further anti-inflammatory response.  In any event your interventional pain anesthesiologist/specialist who is trained in the determination of responses after these procedures can make that determination.

Mike--I'll send the last half in the next note to you---it was too long to send as one article.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Last part of article--

It is important to note that an epidural injection is not a targeted injection.  This means that when a needle is placed into the epidural space, the fluid injected will take the path of least resistance. Therefore in the areas of inflammatory change that is sometimes accompanied by viscoelastic adhesions because of inflammatory changes, may not allow the solution to seep into the correct area.  The solution injected may go to another place in the epidural space that may not be as inflamed and thus inadequate response may be obtained after the injection.  In this situation your interventional pain anesthesiologist will determine other targeted injections, which will ensure placement of this material into the correct place so that it may do the most good.

There are complications and side effects associated with this injection that are infection and bleeding which is common to any procedure where the body is invaded with a sharp instrument.  In this case a needle is used.  If the dural membrane that is the sac that the spinal cord is within with its cerebral spinal fluid is punctured then there is a risk of postural headache.  In this situation when the patient gets in the sitting or standing position, a headache will develop which can be mild to severe.  This is not a serious complication however it can be incapacitating to an individual.  This will eventually stop with at any treatment at all.  However in severe cases where the patient is incapacitated and in severe pain, a blood patch can be done which generally will immediately resolve the headache.  Finally there are risks of spinal nerve and spinal cord injury that are very very rare.  These complications generally do not occur in hands of experienced practitioners.  It is important for the performing physician to be well experienced in the procedure as development of these complications is not as important as there appropriate treatment as soon as they occur.

Dr. Daneshfar is an interventional pain management specialist and performs many of these procedures routinely and daily at the Acute and Chronic Pain and Spine Center (ACPSC) and the local hospitals.  
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Hello. I just found this community. I woke up on Nov. 7 with all the classic symptoms of deteriorated disc disease in C5-6. I never eperienced pain like this and thought it might just go away! Anyway, I went through many useless attempts to find relief, had an MRI on Jan. 14, and had the epidural injection last Wed. Jan. 23. So far I have had no relief, but no serious side effects either. I just want to thank you for the incredible explanation I found here of what I just went through and how it works. I was extremely disappointed that my pain doctor gave me so little information. I am the kind of patient who wants to know and understand things. Normally, I would never have gone through with a procedure without a better understanding. However, as mentioned above, I have never experienced nerve pain  before and after 11 weeks of it nonstop, I just had to try something. Still hoping for some relief...just enough to think clearly and analyze my options. I hope there are some besides cocktails of pain pills. I never dreamed in my life I would ever consider such a thing. This is an unbelievable nightmare!
Anyway, thanks again for shedding some light. I needed it!
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Neurology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Neurology Answerers
620923_tn?1405964489
Blank
selmaS
Allentown, PA
338416_tn?1260996698
Blank
jensequitur
Fort Worth, TX
352007_tn?1372861481
Blank
LisaJF
10389859_tn?1409925468
Blank
Foggy2
1780921_tn?1384615710
Blank
flipper336
Chandler, AZ
900662_tn?1380159390
Blank
johnniebear
chicago area, IL