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Chiari Malformation!
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Chiari Malformation!

Wow, this is getting to be a pain in the butt. I have to resort to websites like these to ask questions, because my neurologist isn't very informative. I'm going to see the neurosurgeon next week. My neurologist first told me WITHOUT doing an MRI that I had hydrocephalus. He ordered the MRI, I had it done, and NOW, he says its something called Chiari Malformation TYPE 2. I don't understand any of this. I've read up on it online, and some things that I read, made it sound like I should have been dead years ago. I am 30 years old. I suffer from headaches, neck pain, leg pains, floaters in my eyes, my head is so swollen on the left rear side of my skull. This is scaring the **** out of me. What exactly is the neurosurgeon going to do? Just tell me whether I need decompression surgery? I also read that Chiari causes hydrocephalus. My brain ventricles are already very enlarged. I am scared of what is going to happen to me if I do nothing about this. I can still walk, think, take care of my kids, its just painful sometimes. My family does NOT take this seriously, and it seems like they think I am a hypochondriac. I don't know what to do exactly, can anyone help me with all these questions? THANK YOU!!!!
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874521_tn?1375890587
sorry for you're pain I know nothing of this condition all I can suggest is looking just to the right of this screen and you will see 'highlighted in blue'
RELATED COMMUNITIES...scroll down to Chiari Malformation and there you should find some answers.
good luck
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Hello and Good morning.  I've pulled some information, for yopu, from the Mayo Clinic web site.  You are probably aware that the Mayo Clinic is among the best in the world.  You can go to their website for more info.  I hope that this is helpful to you and your family.

I wish you all the best!

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Definition
By Mayo Clinic staff

Chiari malformation is a condition in which brain tissue protrudes into your spinal canal. It occurs when part of your skull is abnormally small or misshapen, pressing on your brain and forcing it downward. Chiari malformation is uncommon, but improved imaging tests have led to more frequent diagnoses.

The adult form, called Chiari malformation type I, develops as the skull and brain are growing. As a result, signs and symptoms may not occur until late childhood or adulthood. The most common pediatric form, called Chiari malformation type II, is present at birth (congenital).

Treatment of Chiari malformation depends on the form, severity and associated symptoms. Regular monitoring, medications and surgery are treatment options. In some cases, no treatment is needed.

Chiari malformations (CMs) are structural defects in the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls balance.  Normally the cerebellum and parts of the brainstem sit in an indented space at the lower rear of the skull, above the foramen magnum (a funnel-like opening to the spinal canal).  When part of the cerebellum is located below the foramen magnum, it is called a Chiari malformation.
CMs may develop when the bony space is smaller than normal, causing the cerebellum and brainstem to be pushed downward into the foramen magnum and into the upper spinal canal.  The resulting pressure on the cerebellum and brainstem may affect functions controlled by these areas and block the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) — the clear liquid that surrounds and cushions the brain and spinal cord — to and from the brain.

What are the symptoms of a Chiari malformation?

Many persons with a Type I CM do not have symptoms and may not know they have the condition. Patients with other CM types may complain of neck pain, balance problems, muscle weakness, numbness or other abnormal feelings in the arms or legs, dizziness, vision problems, difficulty swallowing, ringing or buzzing in the ears, hearing loss, vomiting, insomnia, depression, or headache made worse by coughing or straining. Hand coordination and fine motor skills may be affected. Symptoms may change for some patients, depending on the buildup of CSF and resulting pressure on the tissues and nerves. Adolescents and adults who have CM but no symptoms initially may, later in life, develop signs of the disorder. Infants may have symptoms from any type of CM and may have difficulty swallowing, irritability when being fed, excessive drooling, a weak cry, gagging or vomiting, arm weakness, a stiff neck, breathing problems, developmental delays, and an inability to gain weight.

How are they treated?

Some CMs are asymptomatic and do not interfere with a person’s activities of daily living.  In other cases, medications may ease certain symptoms, such as pain.
Surgery is the only treatment available to correct functional disturbances or halt the progression of damage to the central nervous system.  Most patients who have surgery see a reduction in their symptoms and/or prolonged periods of relative stability.  More than one surgery may be needed to treat the condition. THIS ARTICLE IS LONG SO, IT IS CONTINUED ON ADDITIONAL COMMENT PAGES.

I wish you the best!
Marsh2001
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Chiari malformationBasicsMultimediaResourcesDefinition
Symptoms
Causes
Risk factors
Complications
Preparing for your appointment
Tests and diagnosis
Treatments and drugs
Mayo Clinic Health ManagerGet free personalized health guidance for you and your family.

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Symptoms
By Mayo Clinic staff

Doctors categorize Chiari malformation into four types, depending on the anatomy of the brain tissue that is displaced into the spinal canal, and whether developmental abnormalities of the brain or spine are present.

Many people with Chiari malformation have no signs or symptoms and don't need treatment. Their condition is detected only when tests are performed for unrelated disorders. However, depending on the type and severity, Chiari malformation can cause a number of problems.

The more common types of Chiari malformation are:

■Type I (adult)
■Type II (pediatric)
In Chiari malformation type I, signs and symptoms usually appear during late childhood or adulthood. Chiari II malformation is usually noted by ultrasound during pregnancy or at birth or early infancy. Although these types are less serious than the more rare pediatric forms, types III and IV, signs and symptoms still can be life disrupting.

Chiari malformation type I
Headaches, often severe, are the classic symptom of Chiari malformation. They're typically precipitated with sudden coughing, sneezing or straining. People with Chiari malformation type I also can experience:

■Neck pain (running down the shoulders at times)
■Unsteady gait (problems with balance)
■Poor hand coordination (fine motor skills)
■Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet
■Dizziness
■Difficulty swallowing (sometimes accompanied by gagging, choking and vomiting)
■Vision problems (blurred or double vision)
■Slurred speech
Less often, people with Chiari malformation may experience:

■Ringing or buzzing in the ears (tinnitus)
■Poor bladder control
■Chest pain, in a band-like pattern around the chest
■Curvature of the spine (scoliosis) related to spinal cord impairment
■Abnormal breathing — specifically, sleep apnea characterized by periods of breathing cessation during sleep
Chiari malformation type II
In Chiari malformation type II, a greater amount of tissue protrudes into the spinal canal compared with type I. The signs and symptoms can include those related to a form of spina bifida, called myelomeningocele, that always accompanies Chiari II malformation. In myelomeningocele, the backbone and the spinal canal have not closed properly before birth.

Chiari malformation type III
In one of the most severe types of the condition, Chiari malformation type III, a portion of the lower back part of the brain (cerebellum) or the brainstem extends through an abnormal opening in the back of the skull. This form of Chiari malformation is obvious at birth or by intrauterine ultrasound.

Chiari malformation type IV
In people with the even more severe Chiari malformation type IV, the brain itself has never developed normally. This form is also obvious at birth or by intrauterine ultrasou
When to see a doctor
If you or your children have any of the signs and symptoms that may be associated with Chiari malformation, see your doctor for an evaluation.

Because many symptoms of Chiari malformation can also be associated with other disorders, a thorough medical evaluation is important. Head pain, for example, can be caused by migraines, sinus disease or a brain tumor, as well as Chiari malformation. Other signs and symptoms overlap with other conditions, such as multiple sclerosis.

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By Mayo Clinic staff

CLICK TO ENLARGE
  Chiari malformation type I  
Chiari malformation occurs when the section of the skull containing the cerebellum is too small or is deformed, thus putting pressure on and crowding the brain. The lowermost portion, or tonsils, of the cerebellum are displaced into the upper spinal canal. The pediatric form, Chiari II malformation, is always associated with a myelomeningocele. The adult form, Chiari I malformation, results primarily from a small back portion of the skull.

When the cerebellum is pushed into the upper spinal canal, it can interfere with the normal flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that protects your brain and spinal cord. This impaired circulation of CSF can lead to the blockage of signals transmitted from your brain to your body, or to a buildup of spinal fluid in the brain or spinal cord. Alternatively, the pressure from the cerebellum upon the spinal cord or lower brainstem can cause neurological signs or symptoms.
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Mayo Clinic is one of the world's leading centers for treatment of neurological diseases, including Chiari malformation. Each year, Mayo Clinic specialists treat more than 200 patients for this condition.

Chiari malformation occurs in 1 of 2,000 people, but the incidence of patients who exhibit symptoms is much less. Diagnosis and treatment of Chiari malformation depend on its form, severity and associated symptoms.

At Mayo Clinic, experts from Neurology, Neurosurgery, Child and Adolescent Neurology and other medical specialties work together to diagnose Chiari malformation and determine the most appropriate treatment for each patient. What might take months to accomplish in other settings may be done in days in Mayo's efficient system.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, is ranked No. 1 in Neurology & Neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings.

Diagnosis
At Mayo Clinic, teams of experienced neurologists and neurosurgeons use radiographic imaging to diagnose Chiari malformation correctly. The most definitive test used in Chiari malformation diagnosis is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the skull. Mayo provides the tools and expertise to ensure an accurate diagnosis. Read more about Chiari malformation diagnosis.

Treatment
The goal of Chiari malformation treatment is to halt or reverse the progression of signs and symptoms. The type of treatment depends on the symptoms and severity of the disorder. At Mayo Clinic, highly trained and experienced specialists approach treatment for Chiari malformation conservatively. As a result, patients are spared unnecessary surgery that may not alleviate their symptoms. Read more about Chiari malformation treatment options at Mayo Clinic.

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Chiari Malformation

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About Chiari Malformation
Chiari malformation is a rare abnormality at the base of the brain that results in brain tissue extending into the spinal canal. The condition may be congenital (present at birth) or may develop as the skull and brain grow.

Medical experts divide Chiari malformation into several types that reflect the degree of displacement of the brain tissue into the spinal canal. The most common types of malformation are Chiari-I, which often is associated with syringomyelia (a tubular, fluid-filled cavity within the spinal cord), and Chiari-II, which occurs only in patients with spina bifida. The rare Chiari-III and Chiari-IV malformations are part of a larger syndrome seen in children with spina bifida.

Read more about Chiari malformation at www.MayoClinic.com.

Patient StoriesSean Murphy
"I didn't want to be on pain killers for the rest of my life," says Sean Murphy. After surgery for a rare brain condition, his headaches are gone and he is enjoying life again.

Read Sean's story.

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Hi,
Chiari malformation is the protrusion of Cerebellum part of the brain down the spinal column. Chiari type 1 is the adult type and type 2 is paediatric. Symptoms of Chiari Malformation are- Vomiting, Muscle weakness in the head and face , Difficulty swallowing, Mental impairment, Paralysis of arms .

Complications and sequelae of Chiari Malformation are- Hydrocephalus( Raised intracranial pressure ), Cerebellar syndrome, Nystagmus (Involuntary jerky eye movements), Cranial nerve disorder, Dizzyness and many others. Treatment includes shunt placement  for Hydrocephalus and Surgery to enlarge back of the skull . Please consult another neurologist or neurosurgeon  for the treatment. Hope this helps you. Take care and regards!
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Hello.  It's me again. Below are two web sites from GOOGLE that you may want to access, for more info.  

In case you are curious, I have a neurological condition and I have severe arthritis secondary to an anomaly of mboth hips.  I discovered this site on Saturday, I am trained to do research so .... WEll here is more information.

Results 1 - 10 of about 3,660 for CHIARI MALFORMATION COLOR PHOTO. (0.23 seconds)

Search ResultsThe World Arnold Chiari Malformation Association Onsite Information
World Arnold Chiari Malformation Association Onsite Information ... Chip's Chiari Pages Actual surgery photos and success stories from Chip Vierow, former ...
WWW.PRESSENTER.COM/~WACMA/INFO.HTM - Cached - SimilarAmy's Web Page
A weekly updated site about my Chiari Malformation. I have linked to other Chiari sites and have my story included.
WWW.GEOCITIES.COM/NASCAR_GAL101/PAGE.HTM - Cached - Similar
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I am from a small town call port gibson and i have chiari malformation 1.and i have had four brain surgery and my doctor abanded me and my head comes opening an leak.and my doctor has try to get me help but no other doctor want see me.because they don't want to go behind him.i don't know what to do.i am so afraid .but i put my trust an god.
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1496819_tn?1304054589
Im no expert to say what exactly you should do, but I do have a sister who was diagnosed with type three at age 30. She was about three months pregnant when she became paralyzed on her entire left side. One day we are grocery shopping and the next the doctors are saying she might not be able to walk again. They couldnt help her in any way because she was pregnant and by the time that she had the baby her condition had became permanent. So there my sister was, left with a newborn baby, a two year old, a three year old, and a 14 year old. So I would suggest to take the next step. Im not sure what it may be because it was too late for my sister. But Keep moving forward and fight for the power to walk and the pleasure to be able to take care of your kids, for the ability to go to the bathroom by urself and soo much more. My sisters symptoms started about 10 years ago but doctors kept on giving her medication after medication because they only assumed. Her final doctor told her if her disorder was diagnosed early that she would be living a normal life with the proper meds. Theres no changing the past, but only fighting for whats left and seeing the good. My sister will never walk again, but she is on a new medication that has practically took ALL her pain away after almost ten years. To me thats a miracle.

I wish you the best of luck and hope that you will keep us updated.  
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