Aa
A
A
Close
Avatar universal
Snowmobile Accidents leaves contiual headaches
I have a friend 42 yr old male that had a snowmobile accident 3 yrs ago and since that accident he has had continual headaches. This is a person that had done well in his life was a pillar of the community and in the last 3 yrs since the accident he has not been able to hold a job because of the headaches. He has no insurance due to no job. Has had numerous cat scans and mri's to no avail. We are at the end of our rope here trying to figure out what to do. Obiviously there is a problem and we will do whatever we have to get him the help needed but we need more direction. He worked for a month and was off 3 days because of the headaches. Please help!!
Cancel
1 Answers
Page 1 of 1
Avatar universal
Your friend probably has cervicogenic headache as a result of his accident. Cervicogenic headache occurs because of trauma to nerves in the neck region. The trauma doesn't need to be severe in order to cause debilitating pain. Many times, the traumatic lesions are not visible in MRI or CT scans, which only serves to make identifying the cause of pain even more difficult. I had a small tumor removed from a cervical nerve, and have been in pain for 29 years, losing my job 3 years ago because the pain became to great to endure. None of my lesions have ever been seen in radiographic imaging.  For many, identifying the cause of the pain is less important than finding effective therapy, and luckily there now are many options for treating the pain your friend is enduring.

His best bet is to visit a pain clinic, preferably one affiliated with a major teaching hospital. Newer meds (such as Neurontin, Lyrica, Keppra, and Cymbalta - to name a few) are very effective for many patients. Combinations of these meds are often even more effective because each works in a different manner. Be wary of long-term narcotic treatments, not so much because of the (relatively low) risk of addiction, but because in the long run these drugs can actually cause more pain by inducing the body to  "sprout" many more nerve fibers.

Nerve blocks may be useful both for therapeutic as well as diagnostic purposes, and some procedures involving cutting or ablating nerve endings may be successful. However, such "trigger point" techniques generally do not work well for diffuse pain syndromes.

Morphine pumps and implantable electrical stimulation may be necessary for very difficult cases, but these treatment methods are generally riskier than pharmacological treatment.

As you can see, many options exist for your friend.  I recommend his next step be to visit a pain clinic, as the doctors there tend to stay current on treatment methods.

Best of luck.
Comment
Cancel
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Your Answer
Avatar universal
Answer
Know how to answer? Tap here to leave your answer...
Answer
Submit Answer
A
A
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Neurology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
Marathon Running Done Over Many Yea...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
New Article on Multifocal IOL vs &q...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
748543 tn?1463449675
Blank
TMJ/TMJ The Connection Between Teet...
01/15 by Hamidreza Nassery , DMD, FICOI, FAGD, FICCMOBlank
Top Neurology Answerers
620923 tn?1452919248
Blank
selmaS
Allentown, PA
144586 tn?1284669764
Blank
caregiver222
1780921 tn?1462244109
Blank
flipper336
Queen Creek, AZ
11079760 tn?1449081557
Blank
cjtmn
Minneapolis, MN
209987 tn?1451939065
Blank
tschock
AB
4760166 tn?1398360913
Blank
The_beat_goes_on
TX