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Tiny Aneurysm
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Tiny Aneurysm

I am a 30 year old female, just had a 4 vessel cerebral angiogram and was diagnosed with a 2mm aneurysm on the right side of the brain.  I was told I would have to be followed every 2 years to make sure it didn't grow.  Is this the normal time span for follow up?  

Also..I am very active, I run quite a bit and lift weights.  Is this still safe for me to do?  I'm not sure what, if any, effects there would be.  Any advice would be helpful.  

I got the angiogram because I get migraines with loss of feeling on the left side of my body, and my left hand and left foot turn purple when I get a migraine.  Any help on that matter would be helpful as well as i haven't gotten any help.  I also have a hemangioma in my right frontal lobe, partial focal seizures in my Left temporal lobe treated with topamax right now, so my brain is kind of a mess...
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Avatar f tn
Hi,
I'm 22 and I recently got an MRA of my head & neck to ensure that some of the symptoms I have been having for almost 3 weeks now weren't from a dissected artery in the neck. They didn't find an artery dissection, but they did find a "2mm Right Supraclinoid ICA aneursym" in my brain. It's the same size as yours and on the same side.

Where exactly is your aneursym?
Did they think it was causing your symptoms?
Do you have any visual symptoms like blurry vision
or balance issues?

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1093617 tn?1279305602
Hi, Thank you for your question. Cerebral or brain aneurysm is an abnormal widening a brain blood vessel at its weakened area. This may occur as a congenital (present since birth, familial) or may occur later in life due to injury, birth defects, or neurological disorder and it is life-threatening. Most serious consequence is stroke that may occur if this bursts in the brain. Factors that may cause this or contribute to its rupture are smoking, hypertension, head injury, family history of brain aneurysms (so sisters may have). Common symptoms could be loss of vision, headache, eye and neck pain, seizures, paralysis, gait disturbances etc. Investigations like CT angiography, MRI, CSF examination (presence of blood) are essential to reach at diagnosis here. Neurosurgery is the mainstay of treatment that may be suggested by a neurologist after examination. Hope this information proves helpful to you. Hope this helps.

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Avatar n tn
Hi, thank you for your response.  My aneurysm is in the carotic ophthalmic artery right side.  They  told me it was too small to be causing any of my symptoms.  I was also recently diagnosed with Lyme disease, which my hematologist said may have contributed to causing the aneurysm. It has been untreated for so long it may have weakened my blood vessels because I have no other risk factors for an aneurysm.
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