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help with neurogenic cough/vagus nerve syndrome
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help with neurogenic cough/vagus nerve syndrome

Hi,
I feel like I am going crazy. I had a spinal cord tumor removed last Dec. Since then I a always
swallowing. Recently in the past 2 months I have the crazy tickling cough. This triggers my face to turn red, my eyes water, I sneeze,I gag, sometimes lurch like almost vomit yet only liquid seems to pourout of my mouth, and at the same time I may lose urine.It is making me feel very anxious.
My husband is having open heart surgery and I need to be there for him and not have to keep leaving the room like I have to do when the cough or itch in the throat starts.
I was told that because of where my surgery was from c2-t3, all the nerves and muscles were cut in that area and they may take years to heal and possibly may not. I also ended up with hypothroidism after the surgery.
an ENT has me on nortiptlyne but it really doesn't seem to help.
Tomorrow I am going to an accupuncturist to see if that may help.
In March I am going to an excellent neurologist but at this point that seems so far away. I sleep little at night because this keeps me awake.
Please, if anyone is going through this or has I need some solid advice and hope.
Thanks
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Thank you for your question. Vagus nerve supplies in many major organs like heart, lungs, stomach, palate, esophagus etc. Therefore, vague nerve damage can cause bradycardia( decreases heart rate) ,arrhythmia,  voice changes, difficulty in swallowing, gag reflex, constipation and incontinence but its damage does not cause dehydration. However, vagus nerve effect can be amplified by dehydration (though dehydration may originate due to any gastrointestinal illness through vomiting or diarrhea etc.). In addition, vagus nerve stimulation by dehydration can lead to decrease in heart rate/pressure and then fainting. Vagus nerve stimulation and blocking therapy can be two forms of treatments available for vagus nerve damage and they can be utilized as per the requirement of the case. Surgical option (vagotomy) can be kept reserved in severe cases. Hope this helps.


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Thank you for the answer. I will have to research what vagus nerve stimulation and blocking therapy are.
Today I went to an experienced Chinese acupuncturist. The charge was $60 but he said when he saw me, You have nerve damage, this requires special treatment and the cost was double. I was so confused and wondering if this is all quackery but out of desperation I went ahead. He found sections of the nerve that were damaged and told me what side it was on and what it controlled. He later told me of several people that had been healed with some severe nerve issues. He said Neurologists or Dr's in general will tell you it takes 2-5 years for nerves to heal "if" they do, perhaps they won't. I knew that was correct. He said I would need more than 1 session but feels he can help me. Anyhow I just had a major coughing jag about two hours after treatment. But then I tell myself on medicine, that I hate taking I also have symptoms. What a confusing place in life to be. My husband is having open heart surgery next month and I so want to be healed of this instead of coughing and having to leave the room.
Boy any input would help.
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