Neurology Community
what is the cause
About This Community:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Headaches, Multiple Sclerosis, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

what is the cause

I am a 56 year old healthy dental hygienist.  I have been prcaticing my profession for 33 years.  Considering the type of repetitive motion, strange positions and vibrating machinary I use, could this have caused my cubital tunnel syndrome.
Related Discussions
Avatar n tn
Hi, “occupational activities may aggravate cubital tunnel syndrome secondary to repetitive elbow flexion and extension. Certain occupations are associated with the development of cubital tunnel syndrome; however, a definite relationship with occupational activities is not well defined.

As the elbow moves from extension to flexion, the distance between the medial epicondyle and the olecranon increases 5 mm for every 45° of elbow flexion. Elbow flexion places stress on the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and the overlying retinaculum. The shape of the cubital tunnel changes from a round to an oval tunnel, with a 2.5-mm loss of height, because the cubital tunnel rises during elbow flexion and the retrocondylar groove on the inferior aspect of the medial epicondyle is not as deep as the groove is posteriorly. The cubital tunnel's loss in height with flexion results in a 55% volume decrease in the canal, which further results in the mean ulnar intraneural pressure increasing from 7 mm Hg to 14 mm Hg. A combination of shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, and wrist extension results in the greatest increase in cubital tunnel pressure, with ulnar intraneural pressure increasing to about 6 times normal.

Traction and excursion of the ulnar nerve also occur during elbow flexion, as the ulnar nerve passes behind the axis of rotation of the elbow. With full range of motion (ROM) of the elbow, the ulnar nerve undergoes 9-10 mm of longitudinal excursion proximal to the medial epicondyle and 3-6 mm of excursion distal to the epicondyle. In addition, the ulnar nerve elongates 5-8 mm with elbow flexion.

Within the cubital tunnel, the measured mean intraneural pressure is significantly greater than the mean extraneural pressure at elbow flexion of 90° or more. With the elbow flexed 130°, the mean intraneural pressure is 45% higher than the mean extraneural pressure. At this amount of flexion, significant flattening of the ulnar nerve occurs; however, with full elbow flexion, no evidence exists of direct focal compression, suggesting that traction on the nerve in association with elbow flexion is responsible for the increased intraneural pressure. In addition, studies have shown that the intraneural and extraneural pressures within the cubital tunnel are lowest at 45° of flexion. As a result of these studies, 45° of flexion is considered to be the optimum position for immobilization of the elbow to decrease pressure on the ulnar nerve”.

Taken from http://www.emedicine.com/orthoped/TOPIC479.HTM
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Neurology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
Marathon Running Done Over Many Yea...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
New Article on Multifocal IOL vs &q...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
748543 tn?1463449675
Blank
TMJ/TMJ The Connection Between Teet...
01/15 by Hamidreza Nassery , DMD, FICOI, FAGD, FICCMOBlank
Top Neurology Answerers
620923 tn?1452919248
Blank
selmaS
Allentown, PA
144586 tn?1284669764
Blank
caregiver222
5265383 tn?1465260698
Blank
aspen2
ON
11079760 tn?1449081557
Blank
cjtmn
Minneapolis, MN
209987 tn?1451939065
Blank
tschock
AB
1780921 tn?1462244109
Blank
flipper336
Queen Creek, AZ