Parenting Toddlers (1-5) Community
31 month old boy limited speech
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to the challenges of parenting toddlers (age 1-5), including physical, speech, sensory, cognitive and emotional development, choosing a daycare/nanny, games & activities, and toilet training.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

31 month old boy limited speech

My 31 month old used to say some words such as mom, dada ect. at a year old. When he turn 16 months I noticed he was regressing in his speech instead of progressing. I went to and early steps program which evaluated him. He started occupational and speech therapy at the age of 2. He had a hearing test done and it was determined that he had fluid in his ears. He had ear tubes put in in April 2010. Now at 31 months, he is still delayed. His speech has improved slightly. He mocks a bit more and points at things he wants. I'm constantly asking is there something more I should be doing to help him. His therapists say he will come around, he's starting to grasp but he doesnt seem to be very consistent to me. He also had a neurological exam done and it came back normal. His gross motor skills are good. Am I missing something? I dont feel that I'm getting the right results for the amount of therapy he is receiving. There has got to be something more that can be done. I'm starting to get very frustrated. I have sacrificed a lot to be home with him and to give him the attention and the help he needs but it doesnt seem to be helping.

Related Discussions
6 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
1350925_tn?1277388125
Ur son sounds like mine. I have 4 year old twins and come to find out the youngest is autistic. He spoke pretty good for his age around 1 and 2 but around 2.5 he started to regress, and now he doesn't talk at all. I would really get him tested for Autism. As someone who experiences it, that is what it sounds like ur son could have. Hope this helps!
Blank
1278876_tn?1304911919
i agree with yngdad, your situation sounds very similiar to what my family went through with my brother (i was alot olders so remember very vividly) he was about 2 and we noticed he wasnt saying much, like you said simple stuff like moma and dada etc, we went for hearing tests and all of the same things you said except he didnt end up having fluid in his ears or anything. we started him in a sort of preschool that had speech therapy, after about a week one of the ladies asked us if we had looked into it possibly being autism as she recognized it from her son having it. Surely enough my brother has high functioning autism, which essentially means its not the same as just autism, its mainly them processing what they are trying to say from their brain to their mouth. Talk to his doctor and suggest high functioning autism and autism and tell him everything you told us.

And dont worry if he does, my brother is now 12 and one of the smartest kids in class, his speech is a little slower then most kids but he's incredibly smart, has wonderful motor skills and can draw better then me and loves music and can remember lyrics better then most adults. Most autistic kids are very artistic and very good with their hands.
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Thank you for the feedback. I'm looking into getting him screened for autism.
Blank
973741_tn?1342346373
I would also look into sensory integration disorder.  This is a delay of the nervous system and can affect many things.  Basically, it is involved with how the brain processes things and how the messages get sent throught he nervous system.  Motor planning and speech issues are common with sensory integration disorder.  My son was your son's age and hadn't missed a developmental milestone in terms of motor and coordination.  But he had articulation issues.  He has sensory integration disorder.  He now is pretty athletic at age 6 (plays up a level in Little League baseball, plays basketball and soccer and can hold his own in pretty much every sport.)------ gross motor is not an issue at all.  But the motor planning affects his fine motor with things like writing.  Your son is too young to notice all of the fine motor things that come in the next year or two.  

Your occupational therapist should know all about sensory integration disorder as that is who evaluates and treats for it.  We've had tremendous success with our boy.  good luck
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Hi
I totally is in your same shoes expect fro the fact that my son doesnot have fluid in his ears. I am still very worried that he might be austistic but i really dont see any other trends apart from him not talking that he might be autistic(like no stemming on things, or being stuck). I am really frustrated so if u came across anything that works please to share i would appreicated this
Blank
973741_tn?1342346373
You don't say how old your child is or where he is at in development.  I want to assure you that many kids have speech delays that are not autistic. A general delay in speech can be the issue as well as sensory integration disorder and other things.  Depending on your child's age, would a speech evaluation be of help to you?  Often a child with motor planning issues will have had feeding issues as an infant.  They often spit up frequently and gagged quite easily when starting eating "real" food.  Speech pathologists start with infants and work on feeding issues and it is the first step to speech.

When motor planning is an issue for speech, breaking things down into small increments helps as well as picture cues.  For articulation, we did a few things.  First, chomping on something chewy gives the mouth a work out.  A fruit chew, gum, a fruit roll up, etc. work well.  A lollipop that a child uses the tongue and mouth to s uck on helps oral motor skills.  Tongue exercises can be done in the form of games.  Stick your tongue out.  Pull it back in fast and make a sound.  Go side to side of the mouth with the tongue.  Trace the bottom lip with the tongue.  Eventually stregthen to go all the way around (up is hard for many kids with speech issues).  Play a game with music and do silly faces and freeze them when the music stops.  Speak very slowly to the child and have them watch your mouth.  Hold up what he asks for and say the word slowly to him for what it is.  We got a cd that was really great called "speechercize" which was fun and worked on speech skills.  

But an evaluation with a speech therapist would be so very valuable to you.  good luck
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Parenting Toddlers (1-5) Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank