Parenting newborns and infants, up to 1 year User Group
Information about SIDS:
About This Group:

This is a group for those of us who have newborn babies, or infants anywhere from the newborn stage up to a year since there is not a forum specifically targeted for that age group. I think it's very important that people have this forum to share experience and gain advice on the small things involved with newborn/infant care...and this is also a place for new mothers (or fathers!) to speak about the difficulties (or joys) about their new babies, and to get support if you feel like you're struggling with adjustment. Please note::: this forum is NOT a substitute for medical advice. If your newborn has any potential medical problem, seek professional medical help immediately. DO NOT WAIT FOR AN ANSWER ON THIS FORUM. Call your pediatrician or take your child to the nearest ER or Urgent Care Center. Any indications of serious distress, high fevers, excessive vomiting, lethargy, fussiness, lack of appetite, etc are all things that must be evaluated ASAP by a medical professional so please seek help and do not wait..newborns are delicate and time spent waiting could be vital. With that being said...please feel free to ask any and all questions about the day-to-day care involved with newborns and infants, and if you feel as though you're having trouble adjusting please feel free to speak your mind and vent your concerns here and get the support you need. Congratulations on joining our community, I hope that you find the friends and answers you're looking for! I also recommend this group for pregnant women who can hopefully learn some very helpful tips for once their bundle of joy arrives!

Founded by Ashelen on August 17, 2010
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Information about SIDS:

I took this directly from the AAP .org website; the American Academy of Pediatrics. It includes information compiled from studies done by the European Academy of Pediatrics as well.

These are the AAP recommendations for how to prevent and lower the risk of SIDS::



1. Back to sleep: Infants should be placed for sleep in a supine position (wholly on the back) for every sleep. Side sleeping is not as safe as supine sleeping and is not advised.

2. Use a firm sleep surface: Soft materials or objects such as pillows, quilts, comforters, or sheepskins should not be placed under a sleeping infant. A firm crib mattress, covered by a sheet, is the recommended sleeping surface.

3. Keep soft objects and loose bedding out of the crib: Soft objects such as pillows, quilts, comforters, sheepskins, stuffed toys, and other soft objects should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment. If bumper pads are used in cribs, they should be thin, firm, well secured, and not “pillow-like.” In addition, loose bedding such as blankets and sheets may be hazardous. If blankets are to be used, they should be tucked in around the crib mattress so that the infant’s face is less likely to become covered by bedding. One strategy is to make up the bedding so that the infant’s feet are able to reach the foot of the crib (feet to foot), with the blankets tucked in around the crib mattress and reaching only to the level of the infant’s chest. Another strategy is to use sleep
clothing with no other covering over the infant or infant sleep sacks that are designed to keep the infant warm without the possible hazard of head covering.

4. Do not smoke during pregnancy: Maternal smoking during pregnancy has emerged as a major risk factor in almost every epidemiologic study of SIDS. Smoke in the infant’s environment after birth has emerged as a separate risk factor in a few studies, although separating this variable from maternal smoking before birth is problematic.
Avoiding an infant’s exposure to second- hand smoke is advisable for numerous reasons in addition to SIDS risk.

5. A separate but proximate sleeping environment is recommended :The risk of SIDS has been shown to be reduced when the infant sleeps in the same room as the mother. A crib, bassinet, or cradle that conforms to the safety standards of the Consumer Product Safety Commission and ASTM (formerly the American Society for Testing and Materials) is recommended. “Cosleepers” (infant beds that attach to the mother’s bed) provide easy access for the mother to the infant, especially for breastfeeding, but safety standards for these devices have not yet been established by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Although bed-sharing rates are increasing in
the United States for a number of reasons, including facilitation of breastfeeding, the task force concludes that the evidence is growing that bed sharing, as practiced in the United States and other Western countries, is more hazardous than the infant sleeping on a separate sleep surface and, therefore, recommends that infants not bed
share during sleep. Infants may be brought into bed for nursing or comforting but should be returned to their own crib or bassinet when the parent is ready to return to sleep. The infant should not be brought into bed when the parent is excessively tired or using medications or substances that could impair his or her alertness. The task force recommends that the infant’s crib or bassinet be placed in the parents’ bedroom, which, when placed close to their bed, will allow for more convenient breastfeeding and contact. Infants should not bed share with other children. Because it is very dangerous to sleep with an infant on a couch or armchair, no one should sleep with an infant on these surfaces.

6. Consider offering a pacifier at nap time and bedtime: Although the mechanism is not known, the reduced risk of SIDS associated with pacifier use during sleep is compelling, and the evidence that pacifier use inhibits reastfeeding or causes later dental complications is not. Until evidence dictates otherwise, the task force recommends use of a pacifier throughout the first year of life according to the following procedures:
• The pacifier should be used when placing the infant down for sleep and not be reinserted once the infant falls asleep. If the infant refuses the pacifier, he or she should not be forced to take it.
• Pacifiers should not be coated in any sweet solution.
• Pacifiers should be cleaned often and replaced regularly.
• For breastfed infants, delay pacifier introduction until 1 month of age to ensure that breastfeeding is firmly established.

7. Avoid overheating: The infant should be lightly clothed for sleep, and the bedroom temperature should be kept comfortable for a lightly clothed adult. Overbundling should be avoided, and the infant should not feel hot to the touch.

8. Avoid commercial devices marketed to reduce the risk of SIDS: Although various devices have been developed to maintain sleep position or to reduce the risk of rebreathing, none have been tested sufficiently to show efficacy or safety.

9. Do not use home monitors as a strategy to reduce the risk of SIDS: Electronic respiratory and cardiac monitors are available to detect cardiorespiratory arrest and may be of value for home monitoring of selected infants who are deemed to have extreme cardiorespiratory instability. However, there is no evidence that use of such home
monitors decreases the incidence of SIDS. Furthermore, there is no evidence that infants at increased risk of SIDS can be identified by inhospital respiratory or cardiac monitoring.

10. Avoid development of positional plagiocephaly:
• Encourage “tummy time” when the infant is awake and observed. This will also enhance motor development.
• Avoid having the infant spend excessive time in car-seat carriers and “bouncers,” in which pressure is applied to the occiput. Upright “cuddle time” should be encouraged.
• Alter the supine head position during sleep. Techniques for accomplishing this include placing the infant to sleep with the head to one side for a week and then changing to the other and periodically changing the orientation of
the infant to outside activity (eg, the door of the room).
• Particular care should be taken to implement the aforementioned recommendations for infants with neurologic injury or suspected developmental delay.
• Consideration should be given to early referral of infants with plagiocephaly when it is evident that conservative measures have been ineffective. In some cases, orthotic devices may help avoid the need for surgery.



Please visit this site if you have any further questions:

http://www.   aap    .org   /healthtopics/sleep.cfm      (please remove the spaces)


-Ashelen
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