Urology Expert Forum
My 5 year old has a small amount of blood in his urine.
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Questions in the Urology forum are answered by medical professionals at Healthcare Magic. Topics covered include benign prostate disease, penis curvature, cystisis, kidney stones, pediatric urology, prostate, sexual dysfunction, urinary tract infections (UTI), and urological cancers.

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My 5 year old has a small amount of blood in his urine.

My 5 year old son was complaining about pain during and after urination yesterday.  A couple of times after he urinated he immediately felt like he needed to urinate again.  He said it hurt and complained for a while.  Today he has not had the symptoms, and he says the pain is gone.  However, he has complained about his stomach hurting.  He complains about his stomach hurting from time to time.  I took him to the Doctor this afternoon.  They tested a sample of urine, and found that he did not have a bladder infection but did have a small amount of blood in his urine.  The sample is being sent to a lab to grow a culture and for further testing.  His doctor said it could indicate any number of things, and that their test could even be false.  I have been researching online and am feeling concerned about what it could be.  I am assuming a 5 year old probably does not have stones.  Can you give me any additional information?
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A large number of benign and serious conditions can cause hematuria (blood in the urine) in children.  Gross hematuria is most frequently observed with urinary tract infection (UTI), irritation of the meatus or perineum, trauma, nephrolithiasis (including hypercalciuria without stones), sickle cell disease/trait, post-infectious glomerulonephritis, and IgA nephropathy (the last two are types of kidney diseases).

The most common causes of persistent microscopic hematuria in children include glomerulopathies, such as IgA nephropathy and glomerular basement membrane diseases (mainly Alport syndrome or thin basement membrane disease - again, more kidney diseases), hypercalciuria and microlithiasis, and UTI.

Obtaining kidney blood tests and imaging studies (i.e. ultrasound) are reasonable steps.  I would also consdider a referral to a urologist or kidney specialist.  

Followup with your personal physician is essential.

This answer is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice - the information presented is for patient education only. Please see your personal physician for further evaluation of your individual case.

Thanks,
Kevin, M.D.
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