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Bulging Eyes

Our dog was recently dianosed with an irregular heart beat as well as having an enlarged heart.  Her eyes seem to be bulging and are blood shot.  Also our dogs eyes have a blue film over them.  When she has an episode of stress with her heart, her eye bulge even more and the blue film is much more promenent.   Our vet doesn't think the eye problem is cause by the heart problem.  She doesn't know what it is.  What can cause this problem with the eyes?


8 Responses
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234713 tn?1283526659
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Has your veterinarian performed blood pressures on your dog?

Hypertension in the canine can cause multiple eye abnormalities such as:
1. Increased pressure within the vessels supplying blood to the eyes
2. Intraocular ("inside the eyeball") swelling, (which would cause bulging)
3. Intraocular hemorrhage (blood shot)
4. Retina detachment
5. Glaucoma (also a result of increased intraocular pressures)

Your dog could have heart disease without hypertension, however, which could mean that the eye problems are not related to the heart disease,  in that case I would suggest that perhaps your veterinarian can give you a referral to a veterinary opthalmologist (eye doctor).  The eye problems you describe, if unrelated to hypertension could be caused by nuclear sclerosis/lenticular degeneration (age-related changes), cataracts, infectious causes, and more.

Hyperthyroid disease in the canine is so rare that it is usually limited to dogs with thyroid cancer.  It is very common in the cat however.


Helpful - 0
187666 tn?1331173345
What about thyroid? In humans hyperthyroidism can cause bulging eyes, high BP, fast heart beat, etc.  
Helpful - 0
187666 tn?1331173345
Interesting about the rarity of hypo.... in dogs. I just like to think about these issues, see if anything comes to mind. But I wait for your responses to see if I come close. It's a great learning experience. Glad you're back on board and hope you're doing OK.
Helpful - 0
187666 tn?1331173345
Oops, meant hyper...thyroidism. My mind is elsewhere lately. I'm sure you figured that out :-)
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks very much for your comments.

Blood pressure was taken on Stubbie, our dog,  and it was the high side of normal.  Our vet didn't think that the bulging eyes had anything to do with Stubbie's heart.  After we get the heart problem under control, we are going to take her to the opthalmologist.  Stubbie came from a shelter so we are not sure of her age.  We know she is at least 10 yrs. old and counting.  She developed liver problems in Dec. 2006 and is on several medications for liver and not the heart.  My husband and I have ordered a pet stroller for her as she cannot do the long walks anymore.  Stubbie lives to walk and eat.  We have 4 other rescue dogs and Stubbie is the Grand Dame of them all.  She won't be left behind.

Shawn Thompson
Helpful - 0
234713 tn?1283526659
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hope that Stubbie has something easily treatable!  You sound like great pet owners.  For liver disease I always use an adjunct therapy of Densyl (which contains Choline and Inositol), Milk Thistle, Dandelion, and burdock root, along with a good vit and mineral supplement.  Adjunct therapy for the heart is hawthorn root and berry, and Co-enzyme Q10.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks very much!  We use natural supplements and then add medications when the natural support isn't enough by itself.  One of our cats was on Cosiquin for arthritis for about three years before we had to use drugs.  I was amazed at how much it helped.

Stubbie is being checked again for high blood pressure tomorrow. She is doing better on her medications.

Shawn Thompson
Helpful - 0
234713 tn?1283526659
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Happy to gear it!
Helpful - 0

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