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Avatar universal

Diagnosed with Depression, help... Loved one passed away

I recently started to have anxiety and after going to a therapist, she diagnosed me with depression and anxiety. I'm not sure as to the cause, I have a very good life. The only thing I can think of is a recent diagnosis of an inner ear disorder and the other thing is my father passed away 10 months ago. It all started about a month ago right after the inner ear thing was diagnosed so I tend to lean towards that as being the reason. The depression is pretty severe as I am not able to function at this point. I was just wondering if any of you have experienced depression after a loved one has passed away? We were very close, he was my best friend. If so, how did you cope and overcome the depression? What helped? Thank you
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Avatar universal
Most people suffer grief after losing a loved one, not depression, but you're prone to depression it can be a trigger.  Sometimes people (and therapists and doctors) forget that grief is normal whereas depression is a continuing pain in the butt.  Inner ear problems can also create feelings of anxiety, as they affect our balance and that feels a lot like an anxiety attack.  But once you establish a way of thinking that is abnormally disruptive to your life, then you have passed from normal grief or the normal anxiety of a medical problem to a chronic way of thinking that needs to be treated.  Hope your therapist is helpful.
973741 tn?1342342773
I'm so sorry for your loss of your father.  That is very painful to lose a parent and understandable that you are still mourning and grieving.  As to the inner ear issue---  did you have negative consequences from it such as bad vertigo?  I ask because at one time, I had inner ear issue that resulted in vertigo that was debilitating.  I could feel when the tube was compressing (ear fullness, loss of hearing) and it freaked me out because I was anxious about another bout of the terrible vertigo.  

I think you are wise to see a therapist and to be working on both the depression and anxiety.    I lost my mother in a tragic way when I was younger (and she was young) and it was a terrible shock.  I was in a daze for a long time.  I functioned in that I went to work but that was it.  I owned my own home and I closed it up and went and stayed at my sisters just checking on it occasionally.  That's pretty drastic!  But I didn't want to live alone during that time.  I went back after about 8 months.  But it was hard.  If you aren't functioning---  then treatment is even more essential.  If you are advised to do so, do take the medication that is recommended.  Follow your therapy and you should begin to have the clouds lift a bit.  Here is a helpful thing to do in your situation---  find somewhere to volunteer.  Therapists in my area will often recommend this because it gets you doing something, doing something for someone else too which feels good, and is helpful in creating positive emotions and a sense of purpose.  

Stay in touch with us.  We're here to try to help.  hugs
Avatar universal
Thank you for the replies, it helps a lot. My doctor has started me on Lexapro today, I am nervous about taking it but I know I need help. I do have an off balance feeling from the inner ear thing, it's there 24/7 just like the anxiety. I really hope to see some kind of improvement with the medication, the sooner the better. My emotions are out of wack at this point. :(
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