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1099201 tn?1338180918

emotional/depression

How do I deal with feeling feeling emotional. Don't  really have much emotional support.
5 Responses
Avatar universal
What do you mean?  Feeling emotional is perfectly normal.  Always feeling sad or anxious isn't.  Nobody wants to be a drama queen all the time, but some people just feel or show more emotion than others.  If you feel no emotion, that's also not normal.  So explain more.
1 Comments
Been feeling really emotional. Been having lots of crying spells. Been having hard time with the pandemic, family is not understand how hard it i can be living alone. I don't like when they promise things than forget to tell me that plans changed.

I wish they would reach out to me once in awhile. I am always the one who reaches out to everyone. Everyone has people they live with and pets. I don't have any pets.

I have never felt so alone in my life. My parents are there financially but they  have hard time with being me emotional

Everything in my world has changed.
Avatar universal
We can't do anything about the pandemic, unfortunately.  It's driving all of us a little nutty.  I also have a family and friends that stopped reaching out to me when I moved far away and got an anxiety problem, so I get you.  Sometimes families aren't our best sources of support, though.  At some point for most of us our friends become out support when we move out of the house.  Do you not have friends?  And have you specifically told your family you're having a hard time being alone right now?  Some people are more empathetic than others, some just don't focus much on others and need to be told.  It's a very hard time to have been living alone.  But there are things you can do.  You can go outdoors and exercise.  You can go outside in front of where you live and talk socially distanced to your neighbors, who are as stir crazy as you are.  If you can afford it, you can get a pet.  I have lived with this for many years, my family not having contact with me.  I know it's hard.  The only fix for it if your family knows you are having trouble and still don't reach out is to develop a different family of friends.  And that's hard now, too.  If it's getting to you, there are therapists who are working online.  I don't know where you live, some places are more locked down than others, but I found over the years that it was really helpful to just get outside and even if I didn't talk to anyone just seeing them do their thing was like being with them.  I told someone else on here who is also having a problem with isolation to go out to big parks where you can move about and watch others and their dogs and wild animals without having to get close enough to anyone to get infected.  I hope you will look for things that bring you at least in the presence of other people, and again, if you haven't told your family what you're going through, don't assume they know and are avoiding you.  Maybe they don't know.  Peace.
Avatar universal
I also think you should find the occupations that can make your routine more colourful. The pandemic thing is really hard to live with, but we should get used to this reality and try to fill our days with the various things to do. I had almost got crazy during  the spring before I tried to include sport exercising and cooking in my daily activities. Be emotiaonally unstable during this hard period is totally normal. But please, try not to panic and do some hobbies that can make you feel comfortable (with the clear result pointed). When there is a huge feeling of uncertainty, we should do something with the quite predictable result (you can also watch your favourite series as you already know the ending)  . Hope you will be better soon! The pandemic is going to be over, we should just wait fot this moment.
1 Comments
good advice, glad you shared!
973741 tn?1342342773
Hi there.  I understand.  Plus, add in some hormones and ya, crying jags or up and down moods can happen. You are not alone.  Do you have any go to stress relievers?  Things that make you feel relaxed or calm?  Speaking of calm, there is an app called Calm that  like.  I go the premium version because I liked it so much.  It makes things like meditation easy to do when I have never been too good at that stuff.  Outlets (like here, :>))  with people to talk to can be great.  I mean, whatever you like to do. They make those soothing coloring books for adults these days . . .   Whatever it is, do those things.  Would a pet be allowed where you are at?  My dog is most certainly my faithful companion!  Never do I feel alone with my dog around!  And it gets you outside.  Speaking of outside, pandemic or not, you can go for walks and things like that which help mood.  I go almost daily.  I just keep my distance from all others I may pass.  And yes, paxiled is right.  My son began virtual therapy during lock down due to some depression he suffers that was made worse by the pandemic.  It's an option.  We're here to talk, sweetie.  
7052683 tn?1392938795
Paxiled, Akyssa, and Specialmom have some great suggestions! I t can be very hard to motivate yourself when you are in your low spot. Perhaps seeing your doctor for a mild antidepressant like Prozac. It will take some time to feel a difference but you will and when that happens you may feel like partaking in the great suggestions made by your friends here!
1 Comments
Mild?  That's as intense an antidepressant as any other.  Interested in knowing what you mean by mild?  St. John's wort is a mild antidepressant.  Prozac profoundly alters the way your brain works.  Just curious.
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