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Avatar universal

Help!! Really worried about blood transfusion.

Hi just wanted to know how safe are blood transgusions and the use of blood products based on human plasma. I understand in the UK (where I live) and US all donors are tested and blood is screened. BUT isn't there a window of time before the anti bodies form when someone could be HIV pisitive yet test ans negative so therefore infect me?

Please advise me. I am currently pregnant and just had Anti D injection which is blood product but also have been warned that because of my very rare blood type the hospital need to pre order blood for me in case I need a transfusion during labour. How safe is it? Am I right to worry?
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Avatar universal
Thank you. I have decided to stop worrying and go back to enjoy being pregnant again. We are all told over here how safe our blood supply is and I believe plasma products are heat treated aswell as tested thoroughly just that in the UK we are not advised or even made aware that Anti D is a blood product unless we research it ourselves. Obviously I did google it this time and it came up with a load of stuff about potential risks and past contaminations that occured over here in the 70s and early 90s. I think it just shocked me a bit as I thought we'd at least receive a leaflet or be told about what we are being injected with!  

I am glad I had it last time when pregnant with our first child even if I wasn't aware of the risks however small they may be. I suppose any risks are minimal compared to what could happen to my baby or future babies without it. Thank you to you both for taking the time to answer my question. Very helpful website!  
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Avatar universal
Donated blood and blood products are tested multiple times and are very safe.
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I don,t know what the guidelines are in the UK or the US but here in Australia before you donate either blood or sperm you have to have blood test for all blood borne viruses and then return in 3 months for a final test before you can donate.I believe the NAT test is used for early detection of the virus and is very effective.You could find out what the guidelines are in your country.All the best.
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Avatar universal
OK thank you for your response. I understand it is all tested and screened etc but surely there is a window period of at least a couple of weeks when someone who is actually positive can test as negative so therefore could donate without realising they are infact positive. How is this risk eliminated? I realise the odds are slim but surely there is a very real possibility of this happening albeit a billion to one. I don't expect a reply by the way, I see there are hundreds more urgent questions and people in full blown panic but I am just curious as to how things are kept safe to stop my baby from being harmed. All the research I do on the net for UK just says risk of Hep and HIV is rare but still a possibility. Still I suppose in a life or death situation then obviously I'd still opt for a transfusion anyway. I appreciate your time x
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Avatar universal
I believe your question was already answered,but here it is again,Blood screening for Hiv and other blood borne viruses is done with excellence and total accuracy for the safety of the patient in need of a transfusion.I believe they use the NAT test for such screening and early detection of the virus.In the UK and the USA only the best and most careful screening is done.You will be safe from any blood products that are used on you for transfusion purposes.You have no reason to worry at all.
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