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Help reading spinal MRI and CT findings

Hello. I was wondering if someone could help me understand the severity of my spinal MRI's.  I am constantly in pain. Is this very serious?  Here is what the MRI of my thoracic spine reads:
Mild anterior wedging and posterior disc herniation at T9 scan is approximately 4mm in AP dimension with 1.5mm left paracentral cord compression.  Mild compression left T9 nerve root.  At T10-11 there is a 3 mm in AP dimension left paracentral disc herniation with 1mm cord compression.  Central disc herniation at T11-12 of 3mm in AP dimension with impression on the equal sac.  No significant foraminal stenosis.

In 2009 I had surgery on my cervical spine. My recent CT scan reads:
C2-3: Mild loss of vertical disc height  with normal sagittal alignment
C3-C6: Solid-appearing anterior fusion plate fixation.  Expected postoperative appearance with posterior marginal osteophyte of the superior endplate of C4 of 3.5mm in AP dimension with abutment of the left side of cervical spinal cord.
C6-7: Mild loss of vertical disc height with normal saggital plane alignment.
C7-T1: Normal disc hydration, vertical disc height.

I also had an MRI of my lumbar spine but I'm waiting on my doc to fax over those results.  I really appreciate your help.  I've been in alot of pain for a long time and I wonder if my results are severe enough for surgery.  I've tried everything else but nothing relieves the pain.  Please help.  Thank you.
2 Responses
351246 tn?1379685732
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi!
Well, since you have 1mm cord compression and T9 nerve root compression, you will feel pain in the corresponding areas (T9-11). If physical and manual therapy is unable to reduce the compression, then I am afraid, surgery is the only option. Please consult your doctor regarding this. Take care!

The medical advice given should not be considered a substitute for medical care provided by a doctor who can examine you. The advice may not be completely correct for you as the doctor cannot examine you and does not know your complete medical history. Hence this reply to your post should only be considered as a guiding line and you must consult your doctor at the earliest for your medical problem.
Avatar universal
Thank you Dr Mathur.
I did visit with a neurosurgeon and based on my CT scan of my cervical spine, the fusion on C3-C6 failed and he wants to do another surgery to fix the fusion. However, he doesn't want to go through the front of my neck, instead wants to go through the back of my neck.  Is this more painful?  Also, he said I would need surgery in my thoracic spine, fusion from T9-T12 but because it's so uncommon he recommends that I do the cervical fusion first to see if that aleviates any of the pain I feel in my mid back.  I'm not sure which surgery to do.  I have pain relating to my neck and have severe pain in my mid back.  Lately both of my legs feel really heavy, weak and numb.  I'm not sure if thats from the thoracic area or something else but its becoming more difficult to walk and move my legs.  What should I do?  Please help.
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