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Low TSH, normal free T4, hyperthyroid symptoms...

My last thread was asking about high calcium but my calcium level is back to normal so I'm not longer concerned about that.
I got another thyroid test and the level came back low at 0.34, not that low but it has fallen since August, when it was 0.6. My free T4 is 1.4 and the normal range is 0.8-1.8, so I'm normal there. Over the summer they said my total T4 was borderline high but I don't know what it is now.

I have hyperthyroid symptoms. Today I went to the doctor (the test was done at a clinic) and they (the resident and the supervising doctor) said nothing could be done, they didn't even act like it needed to be checked again. But after telling them some of my symptoms they said I had IBS, and I also have hyperthyroid symptoms like having to eat often, fatigue, insomnia, fast heart rate, anxiety, etc.

Just curious, what's the fatigue with hyperthyroidism like? The fatigue I'm experiencing is really debilitating, it's not just a sleepy kind of tired that I used to be able to push through. Also I am wide awake at night but when I do fall asleep I'll sleep for about 10 hours, then I'm tired during the day until late at night again. Another thing, my body can't handle stress. Stress makes every symptom a thousand times worse. And I can't handle caffeine like I used to.
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Avatar universal
Thanks. :) I have considered the adrenals too. I have started taking a lot of vitamin C although it irritates my IBS so I can't take too much, and I have been taking magnesium for a while. I will look into the product you mentioned too, I've been considering getting an herbal adrenal support blend.
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Avatar universal
Have you considered supporting your adrenal glands?  They are another important part of the endocrin system and a lot of your symptoms sound like adrenal exhaustion.  There is a neat little quiz you can take to see if it makes sense to you.  Anyway there are many inexpensive ways that can help.  Homeopathics or a product from energy tools called adrenal can help  they run around $15 - $20   Vitamin b is may also often very helpful and minerals like magnesium.
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Avatar universal
Thank you. A friend with hypothyroidism recommended one to me earlier that I might look into. I'm in West Virginia so there aren't a whole lot of options around here.
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Avatar universal
Maybe subclinical according to lab tests, but clinical according to your symptoms and how you feel.  

As for tests, members have found that they frequently have to request the tests they think are necessary.  Sometimes they even have to insist on getting certain tests done.  You can't just wait for the light to dawn on the doctor that maybe a Free T3 test would be advisable.  Insist on it and don't take no for an answer.  Even if the doctor orders the Free 3 test, I even go so far as to quiz the lab people drawing blood, as to what tests are to be done.  You would be amazed at how often they operate on auto pilot and do the same old tests, which is usually Total T3, not Free T3.

As I mentioned, I think you need to find a good thyroid doctor.  You don't have to have an Endo, just a good thyroid doctor.  Many times Endos have the "Immaculate TSH Belief" and only want to test and medicate based on TSH.  That absolutely doesn't work for many patients.  Other Endos that go beyond TSH often revert to "Reference Range Endocrinology", by which they will tell you that a thyroid test result that falls anywhere within the range is adequate for you.  That also is wrong.  

If you will tell us your location, perhaps a member can give you a recommendation for a good thyroid doctor.
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Avatar universal
After reading a little bit it seems like what I have is subclinical hyperthyroidism, which isn't usually treated.
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Avatar universal
I'm not sure why they didn't test for T3 or why they don't think anything's wrong... it was a walk-in at the same office as my regular doc (since she doesn't want to see me until May) so I think they kind of hesitate to really do anything if you're not seeing your regular doctor. But it's pretty sad because they're internists and they should think about things a little more critically.

I'm not on any meds for anything so I'm not sure what you mean by that.

There are some endocrinologists at the same place but I'm not sure if I need a referral or not. I might call tomorrow and ask if I can see one.

So my symptoms do sound like hyperthyroid? Even the fatigue?
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Avatar universal
Why didn't they test you for Free T3, along with the Free T4 and TSH?  Did you ask about lowering your T4 med and substituting some T3?

Also, since they apparently want to believe that everything is okay, how do they explain all your symptoms?  Did they even suggest any further testing to see what might be wrong?  I guess I am out of date or something but I always though that was what doctors were supposed to do  ---diagnose and treat the patient's symptoms, not just use reference range endocrinology and only treat lab test results.  

What options do you have for going to other doctors?  Maybe we can help you find a good thyroid doctor.  
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