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Women's Health: Postpartum Community
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Avatar universal

Bicornuate Uterus

Hi,

I was told after a vaginal ultra sound at 6.5 weeks pregnant, that I have a bicornuate uterus. I had some mild spotting and went in for the ultra sound. At an appointment at 8 weeks my doctor (not the one I saw at 6 weeks) ordered a ultrasound for 10 weeks to learn more about what exactly was going on with my uterus and had said he was glad they found it early so they can more closely monitor me. He said they would be able to tell then what side the baby was on. At this 10 week appointment I saw a different doctor in the practice (the first one that diagnosed me) and he had no new information for me. It was almost like there was no reason for the ultrasound at all. He said the technician had nothing for him in the chart. I actually was the one that brought up my bicornuate uterus at the appointment when it seemed he was ready to send me home without even mentioning it. He set me up to come back in four weeks at 14 weeks and said my next ultrasound will be four weeks after that at 18 weeks. Does this seem like sufficient monitoring to you all? For those of you who did have a baby with a bicornuate uterus how frequently were you monitored in your early pregnancies? I feel like this issue is being ignored as I am on a regular every four week schedule which is what they lay out for normal pregnancies. They tell me at 6 weeks I have this abnormality with only a 60% success rate and pretty much sent me on my way to worry. Any thoughts or help? Thanks so much.

Sarah
47 Responses
Avatar universal
I would definately make a stink about it and talk frankely to your doctor. Or I would find a diff. doctor. I'm afraid I don't know much about you condition (WHAT IS IT?) but I think you need more monitring than you are getting. Keep us posted.
Avatar universal
A bicornuate uterus is something you have when your uterus did not develope right. You start out with two horns that come together and the middle part goes away. (This is a very elementary understanding because that's about all I have.) For some reason in developement these two sides don't come together right and they leave you with two sides still. The stuff in the middle doesn't go away right. There are very degrees of separation of the two horns of the uterus. This is also called a heartshaped uterus. My understanding is that problems arrise because the baby can not have enough room to grow properly because the baby only has one side of your uterus to grow on. Your uterus isn't allowed to fully expand because only half of it is being used.

Sorry for the not so great or technical explanation but that's about as much as I get right now.

Thanks for posting!
Sarah
Avatar universal
I too, just learned that I have a bicornuate uterus.  I have already had one full term pregnancy in which I did not know this.  My son was born two weeks late, actually.  No problems in delivery, but I did have a C-section because my son's head was so big (he wasn't born breech).

In my situation, my regular OB was out due to a car accident and I saw a substitue doctor, who wants me to meet with my regular doctor in two weeks for him to discuss the situation with me, so I don't know how often I will have to be monitored.

I have been doing Google searches on the internet.  I've printed out several articles and would be happy to send the URLs to you for you to investigate.  If you would like this, email me at ***@****.

Ann
Avatar universal
Hello Sarah,
I am 31 years old and have a bicornuate uterus. This is not the same condition as heartshaped uterus!
I was pregnant one month ago. Unfortunately I had a miscarriage. Doctors detected bicornuate uterus after lost the baby at 23 weeks. I went into premature labour and following a normal labour and vaginal delivery our baby was born dead.


I copied more information for you:
It is a birth defect where the uterus does not form as it should. Instead of one whole uterus, there are usually two separate
Avatar universal
Maki,

Thank you so much for sharing the info and your situation. I am so sorry to hear of your loss at 23 weeks. I am going to see my general practitioner in a couple days to get her opinion and see if she thinks she should refer me to a different doctor. My current OB really seems to have the attitude of "This is your first pregnancy, we don't know how this will affect you,
and there is nothing we can do." Like if I lose it it'll just be a learning experience of how my body handles this situation and next time we'll know. I don't want to go that way though. I think we are lucky that they saw so early that something was abnormal and we have the opportunity to do everything that can be done to prevent all the possible problems that can arrise because of this condition.

Thanks again
Sarah

Avatar universal
my uterus is so bad my doctor told me she was surprised that I didn't have two cervexis. They didn't even know about my uteral problems untill they started my emergency cesarin-section. I nearly died. People need to be very careful and stay informed.
Avatar universal
I too have a bicornuate uterus, my first daughter was born prematurely at 24 weeks because of the condition, my  uterus was unable to expand with her growth and sent the signal that it was time to go. She is a beautiful healthy 4 year old now but I would never wish that 5 months she spent in the hospital on anyone. I am now attempting a second pregnancy, but the monitering is now very intense and a little "spotting" is not normal in this case as with a regular pregnancy. One thing that is not tolerable is lack of monitering. My first pregnancy I had all kinds of problems that were brushed aside, hence the fact I then went into labor at 23 weeks. I remember being told, you couldnt possibly be in labor, go to bed and wait it out!

The biggest advice is sometimes it can work without a hitch, but  be the biggest pain in the world, should your problems go unnoticed
Avatar universal
Last week I started spotting which I didn't think much of as it was not a lot and I know it's not that unusual to spot early on (7 weeks). Four days later just when I thought I stopped spotting I started bleeding very heavily, more so then when I had my period before. I went straight  to my doctors office where they did and internal and external ultrasound. From the amount of blood I lost I was sure I miscarried  the baby but instead I was told that I have a heart shaped uterus with the baby growing in one side and a blood clot in the other. My OB told me the blood needed to come out and things should be fine, however she said she will set me up with a high risk specialist and will be monitoring me closely to make sure the bay is developing as she should be.
I think you should definitely find a new doctor to make sure there won't be any abnormalities along the way.
Good luck!
Virag
Avatar universal
I have a bicornuate uterus, four fellopion tubes and two cervix. When I was younger, there was a complete septum all the way down and into the vagina.....literally two small sides. That was removed when I was 17. This was all diagnosed when I was 16 because I was having two periods. I always asked my OB/GYN if I was ever going to be able to have kids. Through the years, he would say, "I don't know....first you have to try". I'm 42 now with a healthy beautiful 6 year old. I was 36 when I conceived and it was a very easy pregnancy though it was considered high risk. I was seen every 4 weeks. Let me tell you though, my condition was always in the back of my mind. I would think every day that it was going to end and that it wasn't going to work. The same OB/GYN that diagnosed me also delivered my son via C-section just before he retired. During the C-section, they had a couple of experts in the room on bicornuate uterus and afterwards, my doctor said after looking at the uterus, it was a miracle I was able to carry him full term...he never expected it because of the shape and size of it......an 8-lb baby on one side!. During my pregnancy when I would have Braxton Hicks, it would go flat on one side of my stomach and not the other. I have pictures, wish I could post them.
Avatar universal
I was born with a bicornuate urerus and had 2 babies. A 2lb girl, and a 3lb14oz boy that died of group B-strep. Fifteen years later I found a doctor at Medical College of Ohio in Toledo his name is Dr.Wei, he did a procedure called the Strawsman procedure to correct my bicornuate uterus and it worked. I then gave birth to a 5lb 10oz boy, then a 6lb 12oz girl all healthy and doing great. Anita Wiemken @ anita_skeeter_bug***@****
Avatar universal
There is a surgery to correct a bicornuate uterus it is calles the Strawsman procedure. I had it done at the    Medical College of Ohio, in Toled,Ohio  by Dr.Wei OB, GYN.
Avatar universal
I had a very bicornuate uterus and discovered it before wanting to get pregnant. The proper study to see this is the HSG. I had 2 surgeries, the first one with laparoscopy, the second one just from down there. I even went to work the day after, laparoscopy is not a big deal. After the second surgery the doctor said I can forget about it and have a normal pregnancy. I still haven't tried to get pregnant, but I want to share with you that I have a normal uterus now, I hope this brings hope to you!

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