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Women's Health: Postpartum Community
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Avatar universal

Bicornuate Uterus

Hi,

I was told after a vaginal ultra sound at 6.5 weeks pregnant, that I have a bicornuate uterus. I had some mild spotting and went in for the ultra sound. At an appointment at 8 weeks my doctor (not the one I saw at 6 weeks) ordered a ultrasound for 10 weeks to learn more about what exactly was going on with my uterus and had said he was glad they found it early so they can more closely monitor me. He said they would be able to tell then what side the baby was on. At this 10 week appointment I saw a different doctor in the practice (the first one that diagnosed me) and he had no new information for me. It was almost like there was no reason for the ultrasound at all. He said the technician had nothing for him in the chart. I actually was the one that brought up my bicornuate uterus at the appointment when it seemed he was ready to send me home without even mentioning it. He set me up to come back in four weeks at 14 weeks and said my next ultrasound will be four weeks after that at 18 weeks. Does this seem like sufficient monitoring to you all? For those of you who did have a baby with a bicornuate uterus how frequently were you monitored in your early pregnancies? I feel like this issue is being ignored as I am on a regular every four week schedule which is what they lay out for normal pregnancies. They tell me at 6 weeks I have this abnormality with only a 60% success rate and pretty much sent me on my way to worry. Any thoughts or help? Thanks so much.

Sarah
47 Responses
Avatar universal
I would definately make a stink about it and talk frankely to your doctor. Or I would find a diff. doctor. I'm afraid I don't know much about you condition (WHAT IS IT?) but I think you need more monitring than you are getting. Keep us posted.
Avatar universal
A bicornuate uterus is something you have when your uterus did not develope right. You start out with two horns that come together and the middle part goes away. (This is a very elementary understanding because that's about all I have.) For some reason in developement these two sides don't come together right and they leave you with two sides still. The stuff in the middle doesn't go away right. There are very degrees of separation of the two horns of the uterus. This is also called a heartshaped uterus. My understanding is that problems arrise because the baby can not have enough room to grow properly because the baby only has one side of your uterus to grow on. Your uterus isn't allowed to fully expand because only half of it is being used.

Sorry for the not so great or technical explanation but that's about as much as I get right now.

Thanks for posting!
Sarah
Avatar universal
I too, just learned that I have a bicornuate uterus.  I have already had one full term pregnancy in which I did not know this.  My son was born two weeks late, actually.  No problems in delivery, but I did have a C-section because my son's head was so big (he wasn't born breech).

In my situation, my regular OB was out due to a car accident and I saw a substitue doctor, who wants me to meet with my regular doctor in two weeks for him to discuss the situation with me, so I don't know how often I will have to be monitored.

I have been doing Google searches on the internet.  I've printed out several articles and would be happy to send the URLs to you for you to investigate.  If you would like this, email me at ***@****.

Ann
Avatar universal
Hello Sarah,
I am 31 years old and have a bicornuate uterus. This is not the same condition as heartshaped uterus!
I was pregnant one month ago. Unfortunately I had a miscarriage. Doctors detected bicornuate uterus after lost the baby at 23 weeks. I went into premature labour and following a normal labour and vaginal delivery our baby was born dead.


I copied more information for you:
It is a birth defect where the uterus does not form as it should. Instead of one whole uterus, there are usually two separate
Avatar universal
Maki,

Thank you so much for sharing the info and your situation. I am so sorry to hear of your loss at 23 weeks. I am going to see my general practitioner in a couple days to get her opinion and see if she thinks she should refer me to a different doctor. My current OB really seems to have the attitude of "This is your first pregnancy, we don't know how this will affect you,
and there is nothing we can do." Like if I lose it it'll just be a learning experience of how my body handles this situation and next time we'll know. I don't want to go that way though. I think we are lucky that they saw so early that something was abnormal and we have the opportunity to do everything that can be done to prevent all the possible problems that can arrise because of this condition.

Thanks again
Sarah

Avatar universal
my uterus is so bad my doctor told me she was surprised that I didn't have two cervexis. They didn't even know about my uteral problems untill they started my emergency cesarin-section. I nearly died. People need to be very careful and stay informed.
Avatar universal
I too have a bicornuate uterus, my first daughter was born prematurely at 24 weeks because of the condition, my  uterus was unable to expand with her growth and sent the signal that it was time to go. She is a beautiful healthy 4 year old now but I would never wish that 5 months she spent in the hospital on anyone. I am now attempting a second pregnancy, but the monitering is now very intense and a little "spotting" is not normal in this case as with a regular pregnancy. One thing that is not tolerable is lack of monitering. My first pregnancy I had all kinds of problems that were brushed aside, hence the fact I then went into labor at 23 weeks. I remember being told, you couldnt possibly be in labor, go to bed and wait it out!

The biggest advice is sometimes it can work without a hitch, but  be the biggest pain in the world, should your problems go unnoticed
Avatar universal
Last week I started spotting which I didn't think much of as it was not a lot and I know it's not that unusual to spot early on (7 weeks). Four days later just when I thought I stopped spotting I started bleeding very heavily, more so then when I had my period before. I went straight  to my doctors office where they did and internal and external ultrasound. From the amount of blood I lost I was sure I miscarried  the baby but instead I was told that I have a heart shaped uterus with the baby growing in one side and a blood clot in the other. My OB told me the blood needed to come out and things should be fine, however she said she will set me up with a high risk specialist and will be monitoring me closely to make sure the bay is developing as she should be.
I think you should definitely find a new doctor to make sure there won't be any abnormalities along the way.
Good luck!
Virag
Avatar universal
I have a bicornuate uterus, four fellopion tubes and two cervix. When I was younger, there was a complete septum all the way down and into the vagina.....literally two small sides. That was removed when I was 17. This was all diagnosed when I was 16 because I was having two periods. I always asked my OB/GYN if I was ever going to be able to have kids. Through the years, he would say, "I don't know....first you have to try". I'm 42 now with a healthy beautiful 6 year old. I was 36 when I conceived and it was a very easy pregnancy though it was considered high risk. I was seen every 4 weeks. Let me tell you though, my condition was always in the back of my mind. I would think every day that it was going to end and that it wasn't going to work. The same OB/GYN that diagnosed me also delivered my son via C-section just before he retired. During the C-section, they had a couple of experts in the room on bicornuate uterus and afterwards, my doctor said after looking at the uterus, it was a miracle I was able to carry him full term...he never expected it because of the shape and size of it......an 8-lb baby on one side!. During my pregnancy when I would have Braxton Hicks, it would go flat on one side of my stomach and not the other. I have pictures, wish I could post them.
Avatar universal
I was born with a bicornuate urerus and had 2 babies. A 2lb girl, and a 3lb14oz boy that died of group B-strep. Fifteen years later I found a doctor at Medical College of Ohio in Toledo his name is Dr.Wei, he did a procedure called the Strawsman procedure to correct my bicornuate uterus and it worked. I then gave birth to a 5lb 10oz boy, then a 6lb 12oz girl all healthy and doing great. Anita Wiemken @ anita_skeeter_bug***@****
Avatar universal
There is a surgery to correct a bicornuate uterus it is calles the Strawsman procedure. I had it done at the    Medical College of Ohio, in Toled,Ohio  by Dr.Wei OB, GYN.
Avatar universal
I had a very bicornuate uterus and discovered it before wanting to get pregnant. The proper study to see this is the HSG. I had 2 surgeries, the first one with laparoscopy, the second one just from down there. I even went to work the day after, laparoscopy is not a big deal. After the second surgery the doctor said I can forget about it and have a normal pregnancy. I still haven't tried to get pregnant, but I want to share with you that I have a normal uterus now, I hope this brings hope to you!

Avatar universal
Hello everyone..I'm new at this stuff and don't usually talk on forums...but I have found out that I have a bicournate uterus.  I have a healthy 4 year old girl and did not even know that I had this condition at the time.  By accident I recently found out and am now 6 weeks pregnant.  I have been feeling mild period-like cramping and other than that feeling pretty good.  Anyone else have the cramping? It's not severe but just annoying....

Thanks....
Avatar universal
I too have a bicornuate uterus. Discovered during infertility investigations. However after 3 yrs of trying we did concieve naturally and had a 6lb 8oz baby 12 days early (vaginally but at hospital just in case). Conceived baby 2 quickly, he was born on the due date at home weiging 8lbs 8oz. Both pregnancies were problemless. Now expecting baby 3 and hopefully all will go well again.
Just wanted to let you know that it doesn't have to be a disaster and you may be able to carry a healthy baby full term without problem with a normal vaginal delivery The fact that they let me give birth at home proves that I'd think. By the way am planning another homebirth this time around.
Avatar universal
I too have a bicornate uterus. I'm pregnant again for the 3rd time. My 1st pregnancy ended when I delivered my daughter at 28 weeks weighing 13oz (380 grams) and 10 inches long. She suffered from severe IUGR. She also had a brain and heart defect and a 2 vessel cord. She lived in the NICU for 4 montsh before passing away from her heart defect. My 2nd pregnancy I carried for 32 weeks. Again, our 2nd daughter suffered from severe IUGR again. At 32 weeks she was 2 pounds 15 ounces and 16 inches long. She had no birth defects, she was perfect. She was stillborn though. I've had every test ran in the book. The only thing that we think could be causing this is my uterus not allowing room to grow. IUGR babies are at high risk for stillbirth. I now have a new doctor who is a high risk doctor along with my MFM doctor. They are watching me much more closely this time and we are praying for a better out come this time. I'm 11w3d today and due 7/29/10.
Avatar universal
You can read more about my story at http://hannahkathleanelliotte.blogspot.com
Avatar universal
I have been really lucky to have found this site. I am 8 weeks + 5 days into my first pregnancy. My bicornuate uterus was picked up in a scan I had at 5weeks + 5 days when I had some light bleeding. I spent yesterday in A&E (I live in England and thats we call the ER) as I had a massive bleed with clots. I was sure that I had miscarried. When they carried out the scan they picked up the baby and a heartbeat...oh the relief!!! But the consultant said that because of the volume of blood that I had lost it meant that there is a 50/50 chance of survival...so i am just hoping and praying that everything goes ok. I fso baby is due 23/08/2010. Thank you everyone who has posted on this site...your stories have given me hope xx
Avatar universal
Hi - I'm so thankful to have found this post. I'm 29 and currently 12w1d pregnant, and have had one previous m/c at 8 weeks. At 6 weeks with this pregnacy, I was diagnosed with a heart-shaped uterus, though they could not tell how severe the septum is. I've since been bleeding on and off - at 6w, 7w, 10w and 11w5d. The last two were very heavy bleeds. Each time, the ultrasounds have shown that the baby is growing and the heart rate is strong. Just today I went in for my 5th u/s as I've been bleeding for the past 4 days, and they said I had a pool of blood on the left side of my uterus (baby is on the right side). Said the pregnancy seemed fine, but they were usure of what was causing the bleeding, but basically my uterus was shedding it's lining on this side. Sending me for more testing this week. Has anyone else experienced this, and were you seeing a high-risk doctor? They have not told me I'm high-risk yet, but I'm wondering if I should be seeing a specialist instead of my normal OB-GYN. Thanks ladies!
Avatar universal
Hi all - I have just been diagnosed with a bicornuate uterus, as a part of infertility tests. After 12 months of trying with no pregnancies at all, we decided to get tested as there has been a history of fertility issues in my family.
My older sister also has a bicornuate uterus. She suffered three miscarriages and an ectopic pregnancy, where one of her tubes was removed, before she had her son four years ago. After the ectopic pregnancy she was told that she probably could not have kids. During her pregnancy with her son, she had heavy bleeding continually, and cramping. She spent the final two trimestres in bed, and then delivered an 9 pound healthy baby boy by c section. The c section was planned as her son was in breech and they recommended her to not to try and move him into position, because of the dangers involved. Her c section was carried out four days before her original due date.  
They say the condition is very rare - so it's funny that 2 out of the 4 girls in my family have the abnormality.
My sister's was considered a high risk pregnancy and she had to go into hospital for check ups weekly. She also, saw a specialist, so that they could monitor her condition correctly. The fertility specialist I'm seeing at the moment has told me that once I actually get pregnant, the same will happen to me.
I just wanted to share the story, hopefully, it'll help with what you're going through.
Avatar universal
I too have a bicornuate uterus, I was having a scan due to period problems and the radiologist found it just like that! I did not have a clue what is was and I was thinking I was abnormal lol But a year later I got pregnant naturally and because I knew about my bicornuate uterus I was given extra scans and I was under a Consultant through out my pregnancy. I carried my son (now 7yrs old) full term but he was delivered via C-section as he was Breech he was a healthy 7 and a half pounds though and he is a very healthy boy! I do not think I could go through all the worry again though I remember being worried the whole 9 months wondering if he was going to be early or whether he was going to be OK! It has been an insight reading all of these posts makes me feel like I was not alone! many thanks!
Avatar universal
I am 31 and in the 23 week of my fourth pregnancy with a bicornuate uterus. I've known about this since my first pregnancy at 17. I was classified as a high risk pregancy and still continued to see my normal OBGYN. The only real complications that I noticed was the preterm labor. CONSTANLY! I was in the ER several times during the last few months of each pregnancy. So if you are having back pain or uncomfortable in any way don't feel like your panicking go to the ER and get checked out as 9 times out of ten I was in labor. When this is caught early on they can stop it. They were able to hold be off till 36 weeks. My second pregnancy ended me up being in the NICU due to severe bleeding. I was closing monitored for 2 weeks and sent home to deliver by C-section. He wieghed in at 8 lbs. Third Pregnancy ended in miscarriage. But now I am anxiously waiting for baby number 3. It can be done and I think everybody's situation may be different. I hope this helps.
Avatar universal
Hi,
I have bicorunate uterus,detected in 8th week scan.
I am into 14 week, on 1st day of this week,morning i started bleeding heavily,no cramps though,went to ER,doc in ER announced M/C as he saw tissue in my discharge.
To confirm same, had Ultrasound ,baby was fine,with strong heart beat movement.
ER doc consult with my ob/gyn they concluded its because other horn with no pregnancy shedding its lining,havent received pathology reports yet.Though i have not been asked to see high risk specialist.Think we faced same problem, please be in touch with any further developement.

Chicago gal18
1279671 tn?1271214623
i to have a bicornuate uterus, i found this out when i started having two periods a month when i was 15. the obgyn i went to didnt know much about the condition. at 17 i had gotten pregnat and misscarried early from being hit in the stomache so we have no clue how my conditon will have an outcome next time i get pregnat. i was finally reffered to a specailest. im now 20 years old and still dont know much on the condition. i been trying to research what you could do to increase the risks of a normally pregnacy with this condition and i havent found much. i wanted to make sure so that when im ready to have a child it will go as smoothly as possible. does anyone know what you can do to help lower the risks?
Avatar universal
I have a bicornuate uterus and there is a wall between them..2 uterus' attached with a wall between them horned. I am going to be 37 yrs old in a couple of months and i found out i was pregnant at 3 months ..i am now almost in my 22 week....panicking..told i was high risk for cardiac arrest..and miscarriage or still born...
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