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getting off oxycodone
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getting off oxycodone

well i have been on oxycodone heavy for about 4 years and am ready too get off...
i still have a few pill's , but for the last couple of day's i have been thinking hard about quitting. i am sick of my life revolving around doctor's and pill's. i eat them like they are m&m's... My doctor did prescribe me some saboxen..
I have never felt this way about pill's,would never of thought i would quit but they are starting to make me depressed actually,i used to like to take them because of energy and i would do more, but for the last couple of day's i have not wanted to leave my house or the couch and i have pills... i don't know if i should start saboxen or what to do..
any help wold be greatly appreciated.. i don't want to go back to the dr. and get anymore pill's i want to be done and have this behind me, but i am sorta scared at the same time..
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi Summer,

While Suboxone truly is a 'wonder-drug', there are some very important things you should consider before making the decision to go on it. When you start it, you need to be in withdrawals already - otherwise you can go into what is known as "precipitated withdrawals". I've done this once, and believe me you do not want to go through this. Your best bet is to have the Doctor guide you on when you're in withdrawals enough to start using Suboxone. The second thing you should know is that when you are ready to get off of Suboxone, you will have to go through withdrawal symptoms then too. However, if you read a bunch of horror stories on the internet about Suboxone withdrawals, don't let them get you too discouraged. I know quite a few people who have successfully tapered off of Suboxone. It's ******, but it can be done. The biggest issue is the insomnia. I guess what I'm getting at here is that while Suboxone is useful and may turn out to be very helpful for you, make sure you understand that when the Dr. says "mild withdrawal symptoms", what that means is mild leg cramping, sweats, etc. off and on for as long as a month, and insomnia (possibly with bad RLS) for as much as a month.

Your other alternative, obviously, is to go cold turkey. After trying unsuccessfully to get off of Suboxone a few times, I went back on Oxycodone and am now planning to go cold turkey on Monday, so we're sort of in the same boat (I'm not encouraging anyone to use Oxycodone here - if you're on Suboxone, don't go back on Oxycodone - all it takes is one time of taking too much and you can die. Also, using Suboxone leaves your opiate receptors hypersensitive so you're much more likely to OD and die.). One thing I will tell you is that if you have a demanding job and can't take time off work, you're probably better going the Suboxone route, because you can withdraw from Suboxone and do your job at the same time. If you can take time off work and just want to go through hell for 3-5 days and get it over with, then try the cold turkey route.

Another good thing about Suboxone is that at least with Suboxone while you're trying to get off of it, you're in total control of your life. Sure, you're taking pills, but so what? You're in a treatment program, under the supervision of a Doctor, and that's a far cry from using prescription painkillers for recreation. Plus Suboxone doesn't impair your thinking, and has a very long half-life, so you're not constantly craving more and having to take more. Honestly, once you get on Suboxone for a while, you can get your dose down to an eighth of a pill a day, and you can skip a day or so without feeling anything. What's weird about Suboxone is that since the half-life is so long (30-70 hours), you can THINK you're completely off of it because you haven't taken it for 3 days, and then, with stopwatch-like accuracy, the withdrawals will kick in around 70-72 hours.

What happens with Suboxone, in my experience, is similar to what happens with people with Bipolar disorder or any other condition where the medication makes you feel "cured". After being on Suboxone for a while, you might feel completely normal and decide to get off of it. But, without a support group and/or some sort of ongoing plan, you have a huge probability of relapsing.

One last thing for now - SOME PEOPLE claim that you can do a quick detox with Suboxone - that is, go on it for 3-7 days max, and taper off in that period, and not have any issues with Suboxone withdrawal. That has not been my experience. My last experience was when I had precipitated withdrawals. I ended up using Suboxone for 4 days total, and after trying to stop, finally had to take Suboxone again because of the withdrawal symptoms. Also, I finally asked the people who were telling me this exactly what their usage was like, and every one my friends who claimed to have detoxed rapidly off of Suboxone actually ended up using again with a few weeks, so I'm not convinced at all that they successfully recovered, as the withdrawals last 4 weeks or more.

I really hope this information is helpful for you - and I hope I haven't scared you away from Suboxone - it really is a great drug, it's just that you should go into it with eyes wide open about what is required when you are ready to quit. If you don't mind spending 3-5 minutes a day taking a Suboxone tablet, then you can just do that and get on with your life without giving it a second thought. If you want to get "completely clean", then that's a whole other story, involving the tapering and withdrawing.

Cheers!

~Bookwrm
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Avatar_m_tn
Oops - I was just reviewing another post and saw we aren't supposed to give dosing information  - if a moderator could delete that portion of my post, I would be thankful. I'm reviewing the "read-me's" now so I can make sure I'm not breaking terms of service.

Cheers!

~Bookwrm
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi, new here, but not new to oxy addiction, i feel like i have to have them or i'll go crazy, i'm mean, i cry to my boyfriend until he gets me something to snort. is there any help for me, how do i get off????? any advice would be helpful. Thanks, Kel
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Avatar_n_tn
Jeez theres a whole plethora of misinformation in your post. Please do your research or actually have experience with these drugs without reccomending them to others. I'm not saying your lying (about everything) but it seems like you're bringing anecdotal information thats definitely not right into your advice, something that can screw up a person trying to detox more than help them.

1. Suboxone has a very low chance of OD'ing off. The reason you might have thought that OD is a big risk is because beuphrenorprine (the main ingredient in suboxone, has a very high affinity to the main opiod receptor. This isnt to say that it has a very high activation potential, it does not. its only a partial agonist at this receptor. OD'ing off suboxone will not be an easy task to accomplish.

A. it has  a ceiling effect, and although the respitory depression is still a risk, you would have to consume massive quantities , say 32 to 64mg to get in trouble. The main reason that Suboxone has OD nightmares espoused by some is that it has such a high affinity to your opioid receptors, and cannot be removed once in your system other than by time. Meaning, even naloxone will have a hard time dislodging it. This of course is counterbalanced by the fact that you would have to take a massive dose of the drug, something most people will not do, as the ceiling effect makes it clear soon that you're not feeling any better or high from taking it.

I have had excellent results tapering off suboxone within a week, with no withdrawals after that. This was also compounded by the fact that I tapered by heroin use drastically, enduring moderate withdrawals while I was doing so, and then switched to suboxone after 24 hours of waiting. Its not fun, and if you dont have the will power to taper off your opiate of choice and then wait 24 hours (or more depending on the opiate your using, you will end up with percipitated withdrawals, which are much worse than the first two days of cold turkey withdrawal from heroin. Its pretty much an instant jolt from feeling ok, or bearable, to suddenly feeling anxious, jittery, throwing up, and generally worse than you did had you just tried cold turkey without. On the other hand, if you wait 24 to 48 hours off a short acting opiate, the best being hydromorphone, then heroin, then oxycodone, then methadone (which is a ***** to transfer to suboxone from, due to the huge long life)


Second piece of misinformation, is that if you were taking suboxone for just 4 days, you're not feeling withdrawals from suboxone alone, your feeling W/Ds  from your opiate of choice, combined with perhaps a slight suboxone w'/d.

Yet another point to be made- Suboxone taken for a quick taper, say a week, will not produce opiate withdrawls. At most you will feel the remainder of the heroin/oxy withdrawl (withdrawal), which has not been reducing much, since you've filled your CNS with an alternative drug (suboxone) ALthough, being only a partial agonist, your W/d symptoms will have lessened, although not as much as if you had gone cold turkey, given that its only a partial agonist, and an antagonist at other opiod recepters. Judging by your dosage, Buphenorphine W/ds can be either painless (if your only doing mild amounts, or they can be severe, doing almost nothing to get rid of withdrawals,..


A must have for going cold turkey is around 50 xanax for a mild habit, 200 for a severe one. If you can get your hands on klonopins, then you're  in luck, these will take away the jitteriness, anxiety and some of the urge to use, given that your pretty zonked out. Mixing benzos along with muscle relaxants has so far been the best way in my opinion to get past the night, I've gotten 5 to 6 hours of sleep with their help.


And no, suboxone does not leave your receptors hypersensitive, it blocks the receptors so that other opiates  (full agonists) cannot latch on. It also has a really low chance of respitory failure, unless your taking 32mg or double that. Please look into some pharmokinetic information and dont spout information thats anecdotal or just a guess, its just going to hurt more people than help.
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Avatar_n_tn
NA. Please?  XO
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Avatar_n_tn
A lot of people feel better in AA. If you knew my life and I have quite you would understand. Oxy Contin are a step below Heroin. (80 mg~$80 street value) /Tell you anything? AA saved my life, (and a suicide attempt and a lot of tears). Your not supposed to "promote AA", screw it. I will get my pic on here. I am married (20 years with 3 kids). By the way, I would rather be shot than sell one.  lol  (before, not now, I will give them away).  XO
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Avatar_f_tn
Suboxone will work if u use it for about a week to battle the immediate effects of the oc withdrawal. If u stay on subs longer your body will become dependent on subs and u will have to kick that. I've withdrawn from subs and the kick lasted 3 weeks... Not fun. You're in a bad spot, I would suggest detoxing with subs for about 7 days. 8mg on the first-4th day, 4mg  days 5-6 then 2mg on day 7. Something along those lines. You're odds of long term recovery will go up if u go into rehab and get a sponsor in aa and take his/her advise. I've got 3 years clean from opiates. In my experience it took rehab and aa to stay clean, doing it on your own very rarely works for opiate addicts, in fact I've never seen it work. It is not an easy path getting free from opiates, but this is the spot we've put ourselves in. You pay to play. I promise you will never be able to use opiates recreationally again so quitting altogether is the only option. I hope I didn't come off to harsh, this is all just what I have learned in getting free from opiates
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Avatar_f_tn
All i want to day ive tryed everyway possible to get of opiates, including cold turkey, methadone , short term suboxone, and long term maintance off suboxone, FOR ME being on suboxone long term helped give my brain
Time to heal, and phycological healing, it lets you put your life together ;get up and go to work. I recommend
Detox, but see what works for you, being around people and proffesionals helps, i did it with out benzos, eventually your going to have to , and benzos re the easiest thing to gey addicted to and thats a while nother can of worms. But suboxone is a drug you will
Not be in touch with reality untill your off it
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