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Calcification in fibrocystic breast
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Calcification in fibrocystic breast

My recent mammograms show micro calcification that did not previously exists.  I am scheduled for a biopsy.  When speaking with a friend she indicated that her mother who had no family history of breast cancer was diagnosed with  calcification.  As it turned out, she was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer and died within 18 months after aggressive chemotherapy.  

Her mother like myself was about the same age as I am now, had fibrocystic breast and was initially diagnosed with microcalcifications.  Are there any correlations between fibrocystic breast, calcifications, and breast cancer?
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Dear Needtonotjj:  Microcalcifications are small calcium deposits found within the breast tissue.  Microcalcifications in and of themselves are not a condition that would become cancerous however they can be a sign of a problem that may need further investigation based on their appearance on a mammogram.  For instance microcalcifications that are more scattered are probably due to a benign (non-cancerous) cause, a “cluster” of microcalcifications may increase concern that there may be an underlying tumor, thus the recommendation for further testing which may include a biopsy.  

Fibrocystic breast disease is very common and while it can make mammograms difficult to interpret and may increase breast cancer risk slightly, it does not relate directly to calcifications.  Every situation is different and you should refrain from comparing yourself to situations in which all details are not known.  
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Since posting my question on April 16, the resultof my biopsy was positive for malignancy the pathology report indicated carcinoma in situ.  Based on my understanding that is the good news.  My doctor informed me that an MRI is needed to determine the extent of the malignancy and confirm there are no other affected areas.  I realize the facts are not known until the MRI is performed.  

In the past I have had lumps in the left-breast that turned out to be cyst.  While I was concerned about the left-breast, the problem actually existed in the right-breast.  What is the likelihood that another site has been affected?  Should I request a bilateral MRI though the mammogram did not indicate a problem?  
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Do you want to talk?  I too have something I need to get checked out.  But do you want someone to talk to?

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