Breast Cancer Expert Forum
Microscopic Description
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Questions posted in the Breast Cancer Forum are answered by medical professionals and experts. Topics include Breast Biopsy, Chemotherapy, Hormone Therapy, Lumps, Lumpectomy, Lymph node dissection, Lymphedema, Mammograms, Mastectomy, Radiation Therapy, Reconstruction, Self Breast Exam, and Surgery.

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Microscopic Description

1)What does Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the comedo and non-comedo variety, mean?  What is the difference?
2)Evidence of an organizing biopsy site?
3)Anatomical markers with methylene blue?
4)Cribriform DCIS?
5)Hypoechogenic structure?
These are some of my reports I received.  I still don't know the centimeters or grades of my cancers, what exactly do I need to ask for and should it come from my radiologist, or my ob/gyn?  It is difficult to get all the reports and results, when you don't know exactly what to ask for.
Also, if you don't mind, I'd like to know what it means when on mammo - they report fiberous mass and nodes?
Sorry for so many questions at once, just desperate for answers.
Thanks so much!
swalker371
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Avatar_n_tn
Dear swalker371:

1.  DCIS comedo and non-comedo describes the pattern of growth of the cells within the duct.

2.  Evidence of orgainzing biopsy site is out of context but sounds like some sort of radiographic or pathologic evidence that a biopsy has taken place.

3.  Anatomical markers with methylene blue is also taken out of context but sounds like a comment on a pathology report or surgical report indicating where dye might be to indicate landmarks in your anatomy to guide them.

4.  Cribriform DCIS describes another pattern of growth of DCIS within the duct.

5.  Hypoechogenic structure is also out of context but describes a radiographic abnormality that may require further investigation.

6.  Fibrous mass and nodes on a mammogram (out of context) is a description of what is seen on a mammogram.

The best person to obtain the correct information would be the surgeon (hopefully a breast specialist) who did the biopsy.  Ask for full copies of your mammogram, sugery report, and pathology report.  Then, ask him/her to explain them to you.
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Avatar_n_tn
DCIS is shorthand for ductal carcinoma in situ. That means cancer, but in a very early, non-invasive form. It's essentially 100% curable. Comedo-form means there's a lot of it in some ducts, causing them to bulge a bit. It's not more dangerous, as long as there's no invasive cancer found -- but it may have a higher chance of coming back in the breast if not adequately treated. Cribriform is just another way it can look under the microscope, and has no real significance as far as treatment or prognosis is concerned. Organizing biopsy site just means they can see signs of a prior biopsy in the tissue that was removed. Methylene blue is a dye injected to mark an area -- it was either placed to aid the biopsy if it was a needle localized type, or could have been used by the pathologist to mark the edges of the removed tissue. Hypoechogenic is a term used in ultrasound meaning the tissue is less dense than the surrounding tissue. It can be due to many things, including cysts. Ultrasound is like sonar: it has sound waves bouncing  (echoing) off tissues. If less sound comes back, its "hypoechogenic." Fibrous mass is another description of what the radiologist sees. It's a way to describe a shadow, and in and of itself can't be interpreted very much. It can be scar tissue, or tumor, or even a variation of normal (fibrocystic changes) tissues.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you so much for your answers.  I had my mastectomy done in March (DCIS-comedo and noncomedo type).  I convinced my daughter to go have her baseline done and they found a fiberous mass in her left breast and 2 nodes in her right, she is to have a sonogram and another mammogram with magnification done Friday.  She is only 32, and was diagnosed with MS 1 1/2 years ago. I'm panicing for her, not that she isn't panicing herself.  That's why I had so many varied questions.

I would still like to know what report I should ask for in order to find out the centimeters and stages of my cancers.  Thanks for all your help, this is a wonderful place to come for answers, I just wish I had known about this site back in March when I was diagnosed.  

Bless you!
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Avatar_n_tn
If they only found non-invasive cancer (DCIS only) then size really doesn't matter. Stage and size apply to invasive cancer. Non-invasive cancer is called stage 0; as long as there's no invasive cancer, then despite how much there is in a breast, it's virtually 100% curable.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi again,
My daughter went today to have her magnified mammogram and sonogram.  The 2 nodes in her right breast - is lymphnodes, and the radiologist isn't concerned about those.  The left mass however, is still of concern, he said it is way back next to her chest wall.  It barely was caught in the first mammogram (just on the edge of the film).  Today they tried to get a better view and he is still concerned and wants to do a recheck by mammogram in 3 to 6 months.  This relieved us tremendously!  I'm still concerned that he wants to do it again in 3 to 6 months, but maybe I'm just being paranoid  He knows that I'm going through it right now, maybe he just doesn't want to take any chances.  Can't help it - it's my daughter.  I appreciate your help - so much!  This is a wonderful website, and all your comments have been so helpful.
Bless you!
swalker371
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