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Small itchy bumps on my finger.
About a month ago, I developed a few small bumps on the area between my first and second knuckle on the middle finger of my left hand. They are only on the top of my hand. They were very small, perhaps a millimeter in diameter each, and there weren't too many of them. They itched. They were skin-colored (i.e., not red), they didn't seep or pus, and only a few were raised.

Currently, I still have the bumps. The only difference is that they have become more numerous in that stretch of skin, and I believe they may be starting to appear on another finger. They have not grown or shrunk, they have not changed colors. They tend to itch more at night, before I'm going to bed. Moisturizing lotion seems to help, at least with the itching.

Awhile back, I went to the dermatologist and got diagnosed with seborrhaic dermatitis. She prescribed a cream for me, desonide, though I never had to use it for the dermatitis. I put a littl bit on these bumps, and it takes them away, but only for a few days, after which point they return.

I am prone to dry skin.

I am considering going back to the dermatologist for this latest problem, but I feel a bit silly going to the doctor for such an innocuous thing. I'm hoping I can just figure out what's wrong and move on by myself.

Any suggestions?
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Avatar universal
Hi,

It would be advisable to rule out scabies as the cause of the lesions you are having. From what you describe this seems to be blisters. It would be a good idea to consult a dermatologist at the earliest.

There are several causes of blisters.

'Blisters are usually caused by injury to the skin from heat or from friction, which create a tear between the epidermis—the upper layer of the skin—and the layers beneath.

Short periods of intense rubbing can cause a blister, but any rubbing of the skin at all can cause a blister if it is continued for long enough. Blisters form more easily on moist skin than on dry or soaked skin, and are more common in warm conditions.

Sometimes, the skin can blister when it comes into contact with a cosmetic, detergent, solvent or other chemical; this is known as contact dermatitis. Blisters can also develop as a result of an allergic reaction to an insect bite or sting.

There are also a number of medical conditions that cause blisters. The most common are chickenpox, herpes, impetigo, and a form of eczema called dyshidrosis. '

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blister

It would be best to consult a doctor if it does not resolve on its own in a few days.

Let us know if you need any other information.

Regards.
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If these are blisters, what can I do to get rid of them? And what can I do to prevent them from coming back? And, perhaps less easily answered, why did they develop in the first place?
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