General Health Community
tightness in chest
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to general health issues, adolescents, babies, child health, eating disorders, fitness, immunizations and vaccines, infectious diseases, and senior health.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

tightness in chest

tightness in chest and difficult breathing after using a chemical tile sealant
5 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
Based upon the details provided, this probably warrants a trip to the urgent care. Many chemical sealant have large disclaimers about the potency of noxious fumes, especially in under-ventilated areas. I would be worried primarily about caustic chemical inflammation to upper & lower airways, which in severe cases can progress to respiratory distress and/or failure.

If the patient is of advanced age with known or potential cardiac risk factors, it would be doubly important to rule out any potential for acute coronary syndrome that might result from such stress exposure.

Most likely respiratory, but I wouldn't ignore these symptoms. At a minimum, you should probably contact poison control to inquire about specific treatments...

Best of luck!
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Chemical pneumonitis and subsequent reactive airways dysfunction syndrome after a single exposure to a household product.
Seek professional medical help immediately.
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
By all means get to an ER immediately.  Good luck.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
thank you everyone, i have visited my gp, who has given me an inhalor, which seams to have helped, xx
Blank
144586_tn?1284669764
Usually such exposure causes temporary problems that go away on their own accord. Usually there is no specific treatment except removal of the patient to fresh air and to watch for development of pneumonia. Things will be better over a period of hours and eventually you end up back to normal.  There are varying degrees of sensitivity to these substances and the next time hire a professional to put in the tile or use a less toxic sealant. The basic rule is to ventilate and the more ventilation the better. Ventilation does not only mean "open windows" but an exhaust fan in the window to draw the fumes out. Be very careful of a fire hazard. The other rule is never to wear nylon clothing, because it develops a static charge and when you touch a ground such as a radiator a spark often ensues. If there is a stoiciometric mixture of explosive fumes and air there may be an explosion.
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
General Health Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top General Health Answerers
144586_tn?1284669764
Blank
caregiver222
4851940_tn?1385441629
Blank
jemma116
United Kingdom
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
mkh9
CA
8221281_tn?1397574572
Blank
Pantx
Denton, TX
1236893_tn?1394988190
Blank
gymdandee
NJ
1780921_tn?1384615710
Blank
flipper336
Chandler, AZ