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HIV from Oral and Condom half on
Hi,

I recently had sex with a strange girl. I wore a condom, but when I pulled out I noticed the condom had slipped halfway off. My urethra was still covered, but the condom was on its way off. I pulled it back on into place and continued. That time is stayed. But, after a few minutes I took it off and put on a new one. My concern is that while it was half off what if some vaginal fluid got onto the side of my penis, and then when I pulled the condom back down the fluid would now be under the condom. Then, what if when I switched condoms, in the process of the transfer, maybe some of the fluid made its way into my urethra. Maybe that sounds like an extreme circumstance, but who knows.

Also, I did perform unprotected oral sex on her, which I am also worried about. I don't believe I had any cuts in my mouth, but I may have had a small cold soar and my tongue was a little red.

How at risk am I?
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You didn't have a risk.
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I found this on http://www.hivinsite.org/InSite?page=pr-rr-05.
In July of this last year, a group in Spain published an excellent paper from serodiscordant couples, who were heterosexuals, where they evaluated for risks of HIV transmission through unprotected oral sex, and in over 19,000 unprotected oral-genital contacts with HIV-infected partners, there was not a single case of seroconversion to HIV (Slide 5). This included both infected women and infected men, but the majority of the population in this study was infected men.

Also this on the same site
The data we recently published from my study designed to look at this question--and it may be the only study designed to look at the risk of oral sex--we published a study that showed that among 239 men who practice exclusively fellatio, not one HIV infection had occurred (Slide 7). To date, we've now interviewed over 363 men and again find no infections. This represents over 5,000 acts of oral sex, and preliminary infectivity estimates based on certain assumptions suggest an upper bound of less than what Eric published, which is 0.07%, so I think that our data--again this is a study designed to look at HIV infection in men who perform oral sex, as a means of unmasking the effect of anal sex--corroborate not only the previous studies but suggest extremely low risk. And I would say that, from the same time period and from the same population from which we recruited our participants, that HIV prevalence and incidence were extremely high in men who reported anal sex and in men who reported anal sex with a condom. These men were all recruited from HIV testing sites, who tend to be very high risk. There are likely to be certain differences in men who only practice oral sex compared to men who have a larger repertoire of sexual activities. But certainly consistently even in the 363 men, about 30% of them report having sex with HIV-positive partners and we still don't have any infections in this group.

I hope this helps anyone who was as worried as I was.
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Really? It's only been posted on this forum a dozen times this week.
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This study mentions mainly receiptive oral sex with or without ejaculate (which I understand as being the person who 'receives' the penis for ex. in his mouth - unless I misunderstand it ?).
What about insertive oral sex data ? Again, if I get this right, in the case of a heterosexual oral sex action, the men's penis being sucked. Is this sensibly less risky ?
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You misread the studies. It says 70 percent swolllowed.
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Teak hi,
I believe we do not speak about the same thing, but correct me if wrong.
The so-said study speaks about receiptive oral whereas I wonder about insertive oral.
In this concrete case, the risk for a man having his penis sucked by a woman or a man. To the opposite of a woman/man sucking a penis.
Is this a lower risk from potential studies about it ?
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Insertive is not nor has ever been a risk of HIV. Saliva is not infectious and has over a dozen different proteins and enzymes that inhibit HIV transmission.
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Thanks Teak. This is rather a clear answer. Gd nite.
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