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Indeterminate and Terrified!!!
I had an HIV test a little over a month after I had unprotected sex (part of a panel for a bite that I got at work) and it was negative (No clue which test it was. It was taken at urgent care and results were in within a week if that helps). My doctor recommended that I take another test 3 months later. It came back indeterminate. I know that flu exposure can cause this and the week I took the test was the same week that the stomach flu was spreading like wildfire at work. My doctor told me not to worry and that many indeterminate tests come back negative but to take one more test in a month. Well it's test time and I am terrified!! I guess what I want to know is what are the chances that if I was infected that it wouldn't have been found on the first test (almost 5 weeks after I had unprotected sex)? And what are the chances that 4 months after exposure it would only come back indeterminate rather than positive?
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1508374 tn?1380812110
You can confirm with another hiv test. Every test result 3 months after your last exposure will be conclusive. Try to keep calm in the meantime
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Your first test is a very good indicator. Probably better than 90%. Add to that your one time exposure was unlikely to transmit an infection and you should be looking forward to a negative result. Let us know how it turns out...
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3 months post exposure is when you can obtain your conclusive negative test result.
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My inconclusive result was 4 months after possible exposure... So would it have definitely been positive? No in-betweens?
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Indeterminate results are neither positive or negative.
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I know. What I was asking was at 4 months shouldn't there definitely be enough antibodies to cause a strong positive result? (Ruling out the chance that it was a result of there not being enough to detect.) So chances are there was a screw up in the lab, the flu exposure caused a high viral load, or im one of those super rare people who's result doesn't show until 6 months after exposure...... I know I'm over-thinking this... :/
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