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excessive sweating
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excessive sweating

My husband had congestive heart failure over a year ago and since then has excessive sweating.  Is this something that can be treated  or simply a side effect?
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1137980_tn?1281289046
When someone has CHF it actually is pretty common for the person to sweat a little more than usual since the blood vessels in the skin do not dilate as they normally would because the blood flow and 02 levels in his body are being compromised with the CHF,  I would simply make a call to his doc if it is bothering him and get their take on it.  And yes there are things that the doc can prescribe to treat the issue....good luck to you and happy new year......
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367994_tn?1304957193
To address the statement HF has a symptom of sweating is not correct. The confusion regarding sweating and heart conditions may be due to a heart attack can cause  nausea, sweating, etc., BUT  heart failure does NOT have a symptom of sweating.  I have had CHF and there is no sweating involved, and I have researched the subject and answered the question several times in the past...its a matter of confusing HA and HF..

It can be explained and there has been a study done on the subject. The study was whether either sweating or skin/blood responses would be impaired in heart failure patients. It was found that for the same level of internal temperature, the heart failure patient does not dilate blood vessels of the skin as much.                                                                            
The study showed there is no difference in sweating responses among study participants with heart failure or healthy subjects. However, the skin/blood flow response in those with heart failure was significantly impaired, by as much as 50 percent when compared to the control group.

You should have your husband see his doctor on the issue as it is not a side effect nor a symptom of heart failure and an abnormal condition that would have other implications.
  

Thanks for your question and sharing your husband's experience.  If you have any follow-up questions or comments you are welcome to respond.  Having CHF a year ago or so does not indicate your husband's system is not pumping adequately at the current time.  I had CHF about 7 years ago, and with medication, etc. my heart is pumping normally, and I am not in heart failure mode.  Take care and I wish you husband well going forward.
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1137980_tn?1281289046
I think that the point may be that the community members husband is not you and may not experience the same symptoms as you did which makes alot of sense.  In stating that you have researched the subject does not make for an accuracy.   I  have to beg to differ with you on the research that you have done.  A couple of the top doc organizations that would beg to differ as well as myself who has worked in the medical field for over 30 years now as an ACLS instructor among holding other credentials would be in corrective action to your statement...you could find the references directly relating to this in your research on line by googling out........
1.  The American Heart Association "Congestive Heart Failure and Symptoms"

2.  The New England Journal of Medicine "Sweating and Congestive Heart Failure"

3.  Dr. Craig Crandall Senior Author @ ET Southwestern "Symptoms of CHF"

I believe that interiordecorator123 stated that her husband has "Congestive Heart Failure" where some of the confusion may come from is that there is actually 6 different types of heart failure....they would be:
1. Congestive Heart Failure (which is what ID123 has mentioned)
2. R sided heart failure
3. L sides heart failure
4. Forward heart failure
5. Backward heart failure
6. High output heart failure
In correction i have no confusion what so ever if the difference between CHF and an MI after being in the medical field for over 30  years now and an ACLS Instructor......
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367994_tn?1304957193
NEJ: sweating has received little comment in the literature, probably because of difficulty in accurately measuring sweating . . .not conclusive and outdated.

NEJM:  outdated and not conclusive.

The European Society of Cardiology 2005. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.***@****
Expand+Impaired skin blood flow response to environmental heating in chronic heart failure


More recent, Dr. Craig Crandall Senior First study to investigate how heat affects people with heart failure.
Reduced blood flow to the skin's surface may be a key cause of heat-related illnesses in patients with congestive heart failure, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have foundHe and his colleagues discovered NO DIFFERENCE in sweating responses among study participants with heart failure or healthy subjects. However, the skin/blood flow response in those with heart failure was significantly impaired, by as much as 50 percent when compared to the control group.

I have never read anywhere that lists symptoms of heart failure to include sweating!  Heart attack list sweating.  

It is better that OP' s husband talk to a doctor as it appears to me at least that the condition is not the result of heart failure. It is true we all have different symptoms for an illness, however, all possible symptoms for heart failure have never listed sweating and nausea. ..it does for heart attack...why is that!?  I see that as objective evidence!  Not an opinion. I could be wrong, and it wouldn't be the first time! :)

Please we don't want to get into qualifications!  It seems from your self description that you are better  educated, more experience, etc. etc.  than most of us, but don't wear it on your sleeve!  Additionally, those of us may surprise you in our resume of life experiences, education, etc. but not necessary.

Thanks for sharing your opinion, and we can agree to disagree unless you have overriding and recent evidence that rejects your source Dr. Greg Crandall who from what I have read sweating is not a symptom of heart failure and a skin/blood issue that may impair a HF individual's responses to temperature changes...That's how I undertand it!
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367994_tn?1304957193
Silence can be a virtue when there is deficit in understanding.  I have answered more than 10,000 posts over many years, and I have never experienced another side with a  different view on a matter to present authoritative citations that supports the other side on the matter!  There is no evidence that supports sweating as a symptom of heart failure!  Heart attack can have a symptom of sweating, and some people may fail to distinquish a difference.

One should always read and understand the source for their comments when attempting to substantiate their position as something is true!  The OP should not include her husband's sweating as a symptom of his heart failure...just to correct the record for any future readers of the archives or interested individuals that google on the subject.  
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237039_tn?1264261657
Back to the original posted question, the sweating may be from one or more of the meds he is taking.  I have excessive sweating in the hot months, but this has been attributed to one of my meds. I have copied a list of some of the cardiovascular meds that can cause excessive sweating:

Amlodipine, Benazepril, Bumetanide, Carvedilol, Digoxin, Dipyridamole, Doxazosin, Enalapril, Hydralazine, Lisinopril, Losartan, Metoprolol and Hydrochlorothiazide, Nifedipine, Procardia XL, Propafenone, Ramipril, Sotalol and Verapamil.

At any rate, he should discuss this with his doctor.

Take care, Ally
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221122_tn?1323014865
Hi there.  I just want to say that sweating can definitely be a symptom of heart failure.  Yes, it is true.  I have worked as a registered nurse in critical cardiac care at a top rated hospital and have been educated in heart failure by some of the best cardiologists in the northeast.  

When the heart can no longer meet the needs of the body, there are many repercussions.  Hormone imbalance, electrolyte imbalance, muscle weakness and other problems can easily cause a person to sweat.  There is no need to go through case studies.  It is a fact.  Different people will exhibit different symptoms with the very same problem.  

We are not here to take the place of a doctor, however, and you should definitely ask yours if you feel this is a problem, I will agree with that.

Good luck to you.
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367994_tn?1304957193
How else can a differential analysis be made without trial studies and or documented  anecdotal evidence?...I haven't seen it?  What medical information is avaliabe to support that thesis?

Obvioulsy, when in heart failure mode there may be comicomitant health issues, medication, etc, that may cause physiology changes, and yes we all know people have different physiology. Heart failure is related to skin/blood flow, but sweating is normal.   For example can't the issues you have listed cause sweating without heart failure? What is the mechanism associated with heart failure that causes sweating?   Dr. Craig Crandall's study to investigate "How heat affects people with heart failure" disagrees with sweating as a heart failure symptom!!  I am reading poster's source!

In critical care you may have seen heart attack (MI) patients, and yes there can be a issue of sweating...but that is distinquised from heart failure....obviously heart failure and heart attack (MI) can occur concurrently, but heart failure is recognized by health insurance as an EF below 29% and sweating is not a symptom and sometimes there are no symptoms...I don't see any need to keep repeating myself...if there is documented evidence or even a listing of possible symptoms of heart failure from the Cleveland Clinic or Mayo Clinic, that is acceptable.  Short of that the opinions are hearsay.
Take care and thanks for your comments.









  

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976897_tn?1379171202
It does make perfect sense, I mean if a patient is sweating it could be from a huge number of reasons, so how can it be linked to heart failure directly without any research. It's a bit like putting depressed patients on medication to help them sleep and then state that depression causes sleepiness. Just my opinion, but it does seem logical as Spock would say.

Live long and prosper.
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367994_tn?1304957193
I'm also surprised with the comment to put aside a scientific method in favor dogma!  

Chronic heart failure symptoms from Mayo Clinic:

■Shortness of breath (dyspnea) when you exert yourself or when you lie down
■Fatigue and weakness
■Swelling (edema) in your legs, ankles and feet
■Rapid or irregular heartbeat
■Reduced ability to exercise
■Persistent cough or wheezing with white or pink blood-tinged phlegm
■Swelling of your abdomen (ascites)
■Sudden weight gain from fluid retention
■Lack of appetite and nausea
■Difficulty concentrating or decreased alertness

Acute heart failure symptoms
■Symptoms similar to those of chronic heart failure, but more severe and start or worsen suddenly
■Sudden fluid buildup
■Rapid or irregular heartbeat (palpitations)
■Sudden, severe shortness of breath and coughing up pink, foamy mucus
■Chest pain, if your heart failure is caused by a heart attack
___________________________________

AMA:  heart attack is happening:

Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.  
Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.    
Shortness of breath. May occur with or without chest discomfort.    
Other signs: These may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

>>>>An explanation for confusion by responders may be when a patient is seen in a hospital setting a heart attack may be in conjuction with heart failure, and there may be sweating and nausea.  
But heart failure (<30%) is a matter of low cardiac output, and the symptoms do not include sweating from any and all information I have read.  
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221122_tn?1323014865
I am not sure why you are so upset at my answer.  I am stating a fact.  There are symptoms that are not DIRECTLY caused by CHF, but the systems affected by CHF, can cause sweating if they are not working properly.  This is where my degree in nursing and critical thinking skills come in handy.  Not everything I have ever learned was from a case study.  Not all case studies are perfect, either.  Please do not feel attacked if my answer differs from yours.  

I never said you can't have sweating without CHF, so there could be other causes, this is true.  I believe I stated that you CAN have sweating d/t CHF, nothing about HAVING to have this problem.  I also stated that we are not doctors here and they should contact theirs to see if perhaps this is from the CHF, or another issue.

Have a great day.
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976897_tn?1379171202
Please don't feel upset by any of this, we are all here to try and understand and learn. Your original statement was " I just want to say that sweating can definitely be a symptom of heart failure" which is different from "There are symptoms that are not DIRECTLY caused by CHF, but the systems affected by CHF, can cause sweating if they are not working properly", which is basically what Kenkeith said. So at the end of the day everyone is in agreement :)

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1137980_tn?1281289046
Sounds to me like the white flag needs to be thrown down on this one....this  is like beating a dead horse.....case studies, theories, internet research is no match for a Registered Nurse that works in CCC as RitaRN does on a daily basis in my opinion.....i know for myself if i were admitted to a hospital in CCC or CCU as a patient my money would be on the docs and nurses that tender my care and i certainly would not want my medical treatment plan to be based upon clinical trials, internet research where we know nothing of the person(s) who submit their opinions and findings without acute confirmation at the onset of the critical incident...hands on will win every time over scrolling thru the internet if my life depends on the decisions of the caregivers that are trying to save my life.  Altho i have never worked w/in a CCC or CCU myself it would to me make common sense to go with an expert as i feel RitaRN is and not to question her expertise and hands on experience unless of course we bear the same credentials/licenses and professional medical experience hx. with her.  I think that her licenses and credentials speak for themself and anything that is gleamed from the internet could be very very dangerous without having the expertise as she and physicians do.  To me it would be like a hairdresser putting a transmission in our cars...there is no subsitute......i'd say common sense would tell us to leave it to those that have graciously come onto any site that knows which side is up.......freedom of opinions are fine and support even better but are you joking when it comes to calling a out a medical professional with her expertise?  It would be like telling a cardiac doc that you know more because you have researched on the internet...no thanks would be the first thing out of my mouth if that doc or RN said "hold on a minute i just have to go on line to see how to put an IV line in you, or wait a minute i have to find out what kind of medications you are supposed to have because your symptoms don't exactly match the PDR, or hold on the internet is down right now and i have to wait until my computer reboots to commence treatment even tho i think you may be going into congestive heart failure and need to confirm that it might really be happening," and the list goes on and on and on.  There never will be a sub for scrolling the net and direct patient care.  It would be like taking that CPR class on line that is offered and then expecting those that have taken the course to really know what to do w/out hands on experience or working on a crash cart team....i think we need to trust the professionals and to me RitaRN  fits that bill............
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367994_tn?1304957193
I think enough has been said on the subject. Ed addressed the misunderstanding appropriately and correctly. Now, it appears to me the rhetoric has degenerated to saviing face by extolling one's quatlification and by fitting themselves into the same category that is merely an attempt to boost their own creditibilty.  The issue related to the original poster's question has been answered!
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367994_tn?1304957193
Dear moderator, I was asked in a prior situation to trigger the abuse button.  It serves no purpose to extoll one's qualifications in an attempt to discredit...in fact on another board/forum members are told not to engage that type of responses...clearly, that engenders heard feelings and serves no useful purpos!!! Thank you.
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976897_tn?1379171202
It has to be said that qualifications are no guarantee though. In the last two years I had one hospital tell me a bypass would be a waste of time, yet another told me it would be great. It lasted three months. I was sent home with incorrect medication which a ward sister was supposed to check. Instead of 5mg ramipril, I was given 240mg verapamil x4 a day. I nearly died. So, yes I agree with the white flag on this one :)
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1140115_tn?1348499315
Hi, folks,

Looks like we've gone off-track here, possibly losing focus on the original question.  Let's remember that the discussion's about that, and not each other.  Let's also be aware that no information offered here is a substitute for professional medical advice.  

Claire
MedHelp.org
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367994_tn?1304957193
Since I was asked, I'll respond. Yes, I agree also for the intervention by Claire but please stay with the OP's subject on this forum, notwithstanding professional experience, education, etc. and answers should relate to the question at hand by the OP not subjective analysis of one's own qualifications...frankly, I find it boring and usually skip over reading that rhetoric. Let' not engage in oneupmanship tactics.  We all can learn from each other.  The forum is about answering OP's questions.
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367994_tn?1304957193
Yes, I agree as well.  It should be recognized that changing the subject is not in the best interest of the forum, archives, etc., and more importantly it is somewhat disrespectful to the OP and provides no useful information. Thanks.
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Avatar_n_tn
I think she may be asking if excessive sweating due to the meds.  I also was diagnosed with CHF one year ago.  Carvedilol is causing me to sweat to the extreme!!!  I absolutely hate it!  Tiniest bit of exertion and the water works start.  No, I do not have any other problems with my heart.  Doctors checked that all out.  It's the meds.  Add menopause on top of that, plus the upcoming summer heat, and I just might melt away!  :D
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Avatar_n_tn
I think she may be asking if excessive sweating due to the meds.  I also was diagnosed with CHF one year ago.  Carvedilol is causing me to sweat to the extreme!!!  I absolutely hate it!  Tiniest bit of exertion and the water works start.  No, I do not have any other problems with my heart.  Doctors checked that all out.  It's the meds.  Add menopause on top of that, plus the upcoming summer heat, and I just might melt away!  :D
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Avatar_m_tn
KenKeith - I am a complete outside observer looking at this string for the first time today (6/1/2013).  It seems to me that you are not here to help but to try to impose your opinions (maybe educated, maybe not) on others.  It seems very strange to me.  Why do you care that others disagree with you?  To each their own.  And, if you're trying to come off as being so educated, two words...spell check!
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Avatar_m_tn
Just an aside from my personal experience.  Every morning I would wAke up with my shirt soaked.  During the day my feet would seem to sweat all the time.  In chf the fluid tends to build in lower extremities and docs always look at e neck veins because of the fluid build up in chest and neck.  Maybe it's not sweat but excess fluid seepage from the fluid build up.   It leaks out at night when lyng in prone position and seems like sweat with the area and clothes all wet and when up and moving gravity pulling fluid Ito ankles and feet, this seepage feels like your feet are sweating.......at least that's what my doc attributes my symptoms to.
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