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Hepatits B - modes of transmission
My wife and I did some routine tests and she tested positive for hepatitis B, with HbsAg (+).  We are now arranging for Anti body HBs (AC Anti HBs) tests to throw more light on the first results. Her liver echography doesn’t show any node or abnormalities related to the evolution of hepatitis B. Also, the liver markers are quite normal (bilirubin, SGOT, SGPT,ALK phosphatase ).  We've been married and sexually together for 4 years.  My questions are:  1. Can we tell when/how long this condition started?  2.  Why am I not infected too? (We were separated for 3 months before the test).  3. Do I have chances of gettinig the virus through sex? 4. Does our one+half year old son need to be checked too?  5.  Are there immunisations against Hepatits B?
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"Transmission

Transmission of hepatitis B virus results from exposure to infectious blood or body fluids containing blood. Possible forms of transmission include (but are not limited to) unprotected sexual contact, blood transfusions, re-use of contaminated needles & syringes, and vertical transmission from mother to child during childbirth. Without intervention, a mother who is positive for HBsAg confers a 20% risk of passing the infection to her offspring at the time of birth. This risk is as high as 90% if the mother is also positive for HBeAg. HBV can be transmitted between family members within households, possibly by contact of nonintact skin or mucous membrane with secretions or saliva containing HBV.[22][23] However, at least 30% of reported hepatitis B among adults cannot be associated with an identifiable risk factor.[24"

Prevention
Main article: Hepatitis B vaccine
HBsAg

Several vaccines have been developed for the prevention of hepatitis B virus infection. These rely on the use of one of the viral envelope proteins (hepatitis B surface antigen or HBsAg). The vaccine was originally prepared from plasma obtained from patients who had long-standing hepatitis B virus infection. However, currently, these are more often made using recombinant DNA technology, though plasma-derived vaccines continue to be used; the two types of vaccines are equally effective and safe.[28]

Following vaccination, hepatitis B surface antigen may be detected in serum for several days; this is known as vaccine antigenaemia.[29] The vaccine is administered in either two-, three-, or four-dose schedules into infants and adults, which provides protection for 85–90% of individuals.[30] Protection has been observed to last 12 years in individuals who show adequate initial response to the primary course of vaccinations, and that immunity is predicted to last at least 25 years.[31]

Unlike hepatitis A, hepatitis B does not generally spread through water and food. Instead, it is transmitted through body fluids; prevention is thus the avoidance of such transmission: unprotected sexual contact, blood transfusions, re-use of contaminated needles and syringes, and vertical transmission during child birth. Infants may be vaccinated at birth.[32]...."

This is from:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hepatitis_B

I' advise you to go to the site and read the entire article.

Good luck,
Mike
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Hello Mikesimon,

Thanks very much for the explanations and the website.
Have a very Happy New Year.

Konkontiba.
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I just saw this at medscape.com . You must register to view but registration is free and easy and it is well worth the time.

Therapeutic Vaccination and Novel Strategies to Treat Chronic HBV Infection
Antonio Bertoletti; Adam Gehring
Posted: 12/22/2009; Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009;3(5):561-569. © 2009

"Abstract

Therapeutic vaccination for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B has so far shown limited clinical efficacy. In this review, we argue that the principal cause of this failure is the profound defect of virus-specific T cells present in chronic hepatitis B patients and we discuss potential new ways to achieve an efficient restoration of virus-specific immunity in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection......"

I found this an interesting article so please take the time to read it.

See: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/711456?src=mp&spon=3&uac=39980BG

Mike

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Thanks, Mike. I will make good use of that one too.

Konko.
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