Aa
A
A
Close
Avatar universal
migraine triggers, water and metabolic health
I was told that dehydration is a big migraine trigger, so I started drinking copious amounts of water.  This seems to help a little sometimes--but I have this ongoing continuous state of migraine that never seems to go away.  Its not the same headache because it switches sides and has aura symptoms that vary and change, but there is something going on in my head all the time.  The pain is not always debilitating--like a 6 on a scale of one to 10 usually, and then a couple of times a month I have a "day in bed" migraine.  I am worried that I am drinking too much water now--I know I am drinking several gallons a day, but I have gotten into sort of an OCD thing where I worry that if I stop drinking so much my headaches will get worse (they do)  Is it possible that the migraines--which have actually only showed up in the last couple years and actually only been a problem in the last few months--are actually a symptom of some sort of metabolic problem?  Rather than just being a primary symptom in and of themselves?
Cancel
4 Answers
Page 1 of 1
Avatar universal
Hi.

Dehydration or any metabolic condition are not sole causes of migraine headaches. Firstly, your headaches need to be classified first. Migraine headaches are only given as  diagnosis when all other possible conditions have been ruled out. In your case, you have mentioned of a headache that has been present for years. This may be likely a migraine headache .However, other conditions such as eye, ear and sinus problems have to be ruled out. Tension headaches may also be a likely differential. Certain medications, thyroid and parathyroid problems and spine problems may cause headaches.

I suggest you drink moderate amount of water everyday. Eating a balanced meal and getting regular 30 minute exercises will be able to help.

Do you have other associated signs and symptoms?

Any visual symptoms or vomiting?
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Avatar universal
I have had a bunch of tests, and and EEG and an MRI.  I take topamax for migraine prophylaxis, but I don't notice if it helps or not (I have only been taking it for 3 weeks or so).  The only thing that I can tell for definate sure is that coffe and alcohol make it exponentially worse and water makes it exponentially better. However, it seems like the more water I drink, the more water I need, and so I am wondering if I have some other problem that is causing me to be dehydrated which is triggering the migraines--which would be why alcohol and coffee would make it worse.

I get visual auras of yellow dim lights that look like many (dozens) fingerprints blinking  that lasts 20 or 30 minutes at a time.  I get vertigo that can be of any duration--even continuous, lasting for days.  I get odd perceptual anomalies like the sensation that things are upside-down and wrongside out or strange indescribeable sensations. But those are very fleeting.  Sometimes I feel like I am going to faint but that is also very fleeting.  My doctors always seem to think I am weird because I frequently have a strange combination of symptoms that cluster different than what is the norm--so they often have had to try many things to figure me out--(mainly in the area of medication sensitivities)
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Avatar universal
Hi

What were the results of your scans?

Were there any significant findings noted in your scans?

I would agree that your symptoms do appear non specific. At this point, if the scans and EEG showed normal results, then there may be nothing that you should be very worried about. A structural  cause has to be ruled out first before other factors like metabolic and psychological factors need to be considered. You may seek consult with an endocrinologist . Hormonal imbalance may present as thirst ,tremors ,headaches and other symptoms.
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Avatar universal
Hi,

Dehydration is not the only trigger but a very important trigger for migraine attacks.
The possibility that it is some sort of metabolic disorder is very less. I would suggest you to slowly reduce the amount of water that you are drinking since you say you are drinking too much but at the same time drink enough to maintain hydration. Take care!
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Your Answer
Avatar universal
Answer
Know how to answer? Tap here to leave your answer...
Answer
Submit Answer
A
A
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Migraines & Headaches Community Resources
Top Neurology Answerers
620923 tn?1452919248
Blank
selmaS
Allentown, PA
144586 tn?1284669764
Blank
caregiver222
1780921 tn?1462244109
Blank
flipper336
Queen Creek, AZ
7530528 tn?1428275172
Blank
AKC_75
TX