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Broken leg; two year later
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Broken leg; two year later

Two years ago, at 62, I fell backwards off of a step ladder. I was only on the first step, but my foot went down between the steps while I went backwards into the fountain. The result was a double compound fracture of my right leg. Both major bones were broken and exposed about an inch about the ankle joint. Fortunately for me, when I arrived at the hospital, one of the best orthopedic surgeons in Las Vegas was on call. Two years, two surgeries (about 8 hours worth), a bone graft and six months in a wheel chair I am walking much better than I could have expected.
My question; I generally wear softer soled shoes ( walking tennies, etc.) but have started to pronate a little and my knee is starting to hurt a bit - I assume from the irregular walking alignment. Would it be better to go back to a hard sole shot, or even a high top lace up boot - like military boots o do this not reallt matter?

thanks
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Avatar_m_tn
Hello Dear,
Its good that your fractures are not troblesome.For the foot pronation the following can help you;
Motion control shoes and stability shoes incorporate support features into the shoe. Shoes with adequate medial  arch support and firm heel counters help control pronation. Some shoes also have side posts for extra lateral support. Firm midsoles reduce pronation and protect the knees from lateral stress. The inner side of the midsole may be made of a denser material (dual density midsoles) to reduce the amount of pronation. The shape of the shoe is also important in controlling gait problems (overpronation or underpronation). Straight shaped shoes reduce overpronation.
Stability shoes are lighter and more flexible than motion control shoes. Stability shoes are usually adequate for those who overpronate mildly. Motion control shoes are for those who overpronate severely. A heavy person who overpronates  needs a heavier, more supportive shoe than a light person with the same degree of pronation.
Adequate foot support for overpronators can relieve or prevent foot pain, knee pain and lower back pain.
You can consult your doctor about these shoes and  can try them  for better results.
Best


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Avatar_m_tn
A clarification; Re: Broken leg; two year later

In my question, I said I was pronating - That is incorrect. What I should have said was that I an supinating, i.e., my ankle joint tends to roll out, where my walking is generally on the right side of my (right) foot and towards the heel.

Does your response still apply?

thanks so much for your help,

"nevadamel"
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