Speech & Language Disorders Community
Speech Delays
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This patient support community is for discussions relating to Speech and Language Disorders. Topics include, but are not limited to: Aphasia, Apraxia, Autism and Communication, Developmental Dyspraxia, Motor Speech Disorder, Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders, Paradoxical Vocal Fold Movement (PVFM), Tongue-Tie (Ankyloglossia), Voice Disorders

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Speech Delays

My daughter has shown a lot of signs of speech delay. Her doctor suggested putting her in school and seeing if that would help her. It has helped her grown a lot, but she's not where she should be. She will barely talk to her teachers and isn't making much progress at home anymore. We kept her at home with us until she was 3 and we initially thought that was the cause of it. She just recently turned 4 and we finally realized she probably needs to some extra help than just the child development counselor at the school. So, she is getting an evaluation from a speech therapist and an appointment with an occupational therapist. I'm so glad we have her at a school with so many connections. But, it just kills me to admit that she needs extra help. It hurts so bad to see the other kids talking normally and then my daughter has a hard time just asking to use the bathroom. My husband and I are both having a hard time with it. Very few of our friends understand what is going on. People have mentioned they've seen a problem, but have been blatantly mean and angry about it. Why on earth would we listen to someone like that? We don't really know very many other people with children, let alone children with speech delays. Right now we feel alone in this.  It's hard to see someone you love so much struggling with something that should come easily.
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1006035_tn?1391310794
I should probably clarify that she does talk a lot more at home than at school. We think she has selective mutism and social anxiety. Thankfully she is staying pretty positive about going to school and looks forward to it each day!
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973741_tn?1342346373
Hi.  Well, it is so very hard to cross that bridge to acceptance of an issue with our beloved child.  I know that when I was told my son had symptoms of sensory integration disorder, I was very mad at ll involved.  I didn't see it as he was also quite different at home.  In retrospect, there were things going on at home that I just wasn't aware were sensory related.  He was diagnosed at 4 with sensory.  I was so depressed and anxious.  I wasn't sleeping.  I became kind of isolated.  I didn't want to talk to all my friends that didn't have a heavy heart as they pictured what a developmental delay meant for their child.  It was a really dark period in my life.  Then one night when I was sitting yet again in the living room trying to figure it all out------- it came to me.  I loved my son.  And even though he had a delay and wasn't this "perfect" child. . . I still loved him in every way.  He is a blessing to my life.  And from that moment on------- my outlook changed.  My mission became to help him in any way possible.  

We started occupational therapy at 4.5 and I did lots and lots of things at home to help him along.  I read everything I could on developmental delays, sensory integration disorder, speech delays, even autism.  And we worked hard.

Diva, my boy is now 6.5 and going into first grade.  He has absolutely no issue at school.  He speaks fine, is able to focus, has friends, and fits in just fine.  We do still do occupational therapy once a week-------- and work on his nervous system-------- but he is fine.  He'll be just fine.  I never would have believed it when he was 4.  But I was told then and now am a firm believer that they can do amazing things with kids through early intervention.  Amazing things.  You are on the right track to let the school help you.  Follow what they say and be open minded to their ideas.  

I'd consider googling sensory integration disorder regarding your daughter and look up motor planning.  This has to do with processing.  The brain has to organize itself to understand and then answer questions and the articulate the sounds of their answer.  It would cause a child to just stare or smile when someone asked them a question in an overwhelming enviroment.  

I also was told that having our son around other kids his age on play date type outings was essential.  We didn't know that many people either so we'd go to parks or play gyms and just meet anyone that we could.  It is important to do this when there is a speech delay.

And lastly, we attended a "group" that had a child with sensory integration disorder and selective mutism.  It was a summer group run by an occupational therapist office.  The OT's would have the boy whisper if he did not want to speak.  By the end of the 6 week session he would whisper.  They were also so encouraged because he started interacting more with the other kids.  So look for groups with kids that have various issues to join.  They help each other along.  Most of the kids in my son's groups you  couldn't even tell What exactly their issue was.  So it feels like a normal play group.  

Ugh.  I'm tired and I really hope this made sense.  

But don't feel alone.  I know how you are feeling and it IS painful.  But it will be okay.  Know that they really can do amazing things for our kids!
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