Undiagnosed Symptoms Community
Vertigo
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Vertigo

I have had vertigo for over a year on and off. I recently have been getting it weekly. I have the same symptoms of dizziness, the room spinning, double vision, the feeling that I am going to vomit, it lasts for about 15 minutes before I feel a little sense of relief. I have had an MRI, MRA and now I am being treated by an ENT that believes that she can cure me. I have been taking Meclezine and Valium but it only masks it temporarily before it returns again. Where does it come from??
Tags: naseau
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Avatar_m_tn
Hello,
Vertigo (dizziness) is an uncomfortable feeling of motion when there is no actual movement. The feeling of motion is commonly described as spinning or whirling, but it also may include sensations of falling or tilting. Vertigo can cause nausea and vomiting. It may be difficult to maintain balance, walk, or stand. Vertigo can be caused by problems in the brain or  by inflammation within the inner ear (labyrinthitis), which is characterized by the sudden onset of vertigo and may be associated with hearing loss. The most common cause of labyrinthitis is a viral or bacterial infection.
So  you are getting the right treatment  and it will take a period of time to get completely rid off. In case condition get worsened you should
Consult to a neurologist. Hope it helps. Take care and pls do keep me posted.
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351246_tn?1379685732
Hi
Thanks for writing to the forum!
“Vertigo can be caused by disorders of body parts that are involved in maintaining balance:
• Inner ear
• Brain stem and cerebellum
• Nerve tracts connecting the brain stem and cerebellum or within the brain stem
Inner Ear Disorders: Most commonly, vertigo results from motion sickness. Motion sickness may develop in people whose inner ear is sensitive to particular motions, such as swaying or sudden stopping and starting.
Another common cause of vertigo is an abnormal collection of calcium particles in one semicircular canal of the inner ear. The resulting disorder, called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or BPPV, is especially common among older people. It occurs when the head is moved in certain ways.
Meniere's disease produces attacks of vertigo. The cause of Meniere's disease is thought to involve excess fluid in the inner ear (hydrops). What triggers this is unknown, but it may result from an autoimmune reaction, an allergy, an imbalance in the autonomic nervous system, a blockage to certain structures in the ear, or a viral infection.
Disorders of the vestibulocochlear nerve can cause vertigo, a hearing disorder, or both.
Other disorders that may cause vertigo by affecting the inner ear or its nerve connections include the following:
• Bacterial or viral infections, such as vestibular neuritis, herpes zoster, and mastoiditis
• Paget's disease
• Tumors, such as an auditory nerve tumor
• Inflammation of nerves
The inner ear may also be damaged by drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, aspirin
, the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, the sedative Phenobarbital, the anticonvulsant phenytoin, the antipsychotic chlorpromazine and certain diuretics including furosemide Excessive use of alcohol can cause temporary vertigo.
Disorders That Affect the Brain: A decrease in the blood supply through arteries to the brain stem, cerebellum, and back of the brain can cause vertigo. This decrease is called vertebrobasilar insufficiency because the arteries affected include the vertebral and basilar arteries. If the decreased blood supply causes temporary symptoms, a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is diagnosed. If permanent damage results, a stroke is diagnosed.
Less common disorders that cause vertigo by affecting the brain stem or cerebellum include multiple sclerosis, fractures at the base of the skull, head injuries, seizures, infections, and tumors growing in or near the base of the brain. Vertigo can sometimes be part of a migraine attack and occasionally occur without the headache.
Occasionally, vertigo is caused by disorders that suddenly increase pressure within the skull, putting pressure on the brain. These disorders include benign intracranial hypertension, brain tumors, and bleeding (hemorrhage) within the skull.” Refer: http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec06/ch080/ch080c.html
Hope this helps. I think you should discuss these possibilities with your doctor. It is difficult to comment beyond this without examining. A comprehensive investigation is required keeping all the points in mind. Please let me know if there is any thing else and do keep me posted. Take care!
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