Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Hashis and high cortisol

Hi I have Hashis and high cortisol confirmed by adrenal saliva test results, any idea what I need to do about all of this? I know that endos don't usually like discussing alternative testing like salivary tests so not sure what to do. Also tested positive for a tumour marker called Lactate Dehydrogenase (?)
Vitamins and minerals are not as good as they should be according to doctor but no idea what to do about them either. Thank you

TPOab - 495 (<34)
TGab - 288.3 (<115)
Ferritin - 112 (15 - 150 premenopausal females)
Folate - 2.31 (2.5 - 19.5)
Vitamin B12 - 482 (180 - 900)
Total 25 OH vitamin D - 51.3 (50 - 75 suboptimal range)
1 Responses
1530171 tn?1448129593
Hmm, you;re between a rock and a hard place.
Adrenal fatigue is a good possibility and should it be confirmed, it really presents a challenge since you will have a conflct with your conventional Endo and possibly your PCP, as they usually turn a blind eye in such cases.
The issue is that  thyroid treatment in most cases like yours, must be suspended while treating the adrenals Adrenal Fatigue can easily progress to stage 2 or 3, if this is not respected.
You must correct your deficiencies, some of which are linked to reverse T3 (rt3) dominance (more on my next post later) and try to hook up with a reputable Functional Medicine or Naturopathic doctor to help you with all this.
I'll post later, when time permits.
Best wishes,
Niko
PS
Your positive  Lactate Dehydrogenase is non specific,
so please don't jump to conclusions yet.
1 Comments
So, since your cortisol is high, veritying adrenal fatigue is what will dictate the approach.
In stage 1, cortisol levels are high, affecting negatively the 5-deiodinase enzyme, causing higher levels of
Reverse T3 (rt3), thus reducing Free
T3 - the available thyroid hormone your body can use for thyroid function!
You need to discuss this further with the practitioner who ordered this saliva test.
Now because no thyroid meds should be used, before the suspected adrenal
issues are addressed, you need to get this done soon!
At best, your Practitioner may put you on a minimum dose of slow release
You may have to "break away" from your conventional doctors, in order to receive proper treatment.
Note that T4 like Levothyroxine, in such cases, converts to rt3, further reducing your thyroid function, something you certainly must avoid.
Did you get your DHEA levels tested?
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Autoimmune Disorders Community

Top Autoimmune Diseases Answerers
1756321 tn?1547095325
Queensland, Australia
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
For people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), the COVID-19 pandemic can be particularly challenging.
A list of national and international resources and hotlines to help connect you to needed health and medical services.
Here’s how your baby’s growing in your body each week.
These common ADD/ADHD myths could already be hurting your child
This article will tell you more about strength training at home, giving you some options that require little to no equipment.
In You Can Prevent a Stroke, Dr. Joshua Yamamoto and Dr. Kristin Thomas help us understand what we can do to prevent a stroke.