Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
1474276 tn?1287050410

explosive moods?

I was wondering if anyone else feels like they are going to explode some days.  Yesterday, I could not be around anyone for fear of biting off their head, and mean things just come popping out of mouth without any cause.  I feel horrible and hate staying away from my daughter, but don't want to emotionally hurt her.  
11 Responses
Avatar universal
Yep, I get that way too sometimes.  But the last time I did that, I was weaning off my medication.  It troubled me so much that I went back to my psychiatrist and told her about it and we're creeping the dose back up again to where it was.  Irritability/anger is a common symptom in BP.
Rogelio
1474276 tn?1287050410
My doctor added Lamictal, but I think all the explosiveness and just blurting out whatever comes to mind before thinking, hurting people, started before this.  She said the Lamictal would stabilize my moods, but so far, I haven't seen any change except for the worse.  
1224351 tn?1325374817
Yesterday I felt exactly the same as you! I was telling the dog off, and even wanted to punch my laptop screen when the pages were loading slowly! Its not like me at all. But unfortunately yes its a common symptom in BP.
Im also on Lamictal 300mgs and for the past few months Ive not had any anger up until yesterday, so my psych doc is upping it. Lets hope that does the job.
What meds are you on? and what mg of Lamictal are you taking?
Victoria ~
1462137 tn?1287192711
I get like that sometimes. Especially if I am experiencing withdrawal from my meds (if I miss a day or something). It sometimes accompanies my manic episodes.
Avatar universal
Yes,
I have the same prob,have known about my BP for the last ten year and in the last year have noticed it has become worse ( am type 2 ) and the mania is worse.my temper was never to bad before this.It is a scary feeling though as you don't feel you have any control over it .
Avatar universal
My adult son has been diagnosed with BP II, and having chosen not to accept treatment, is prone to explosive rage during mania.  Unfortunately, it leads him not only to verbal abuse but physical violence as well, and speaking as his smallish mom, I have to admit that it is scary.
Avatar universal
@ Yarrow.... How do you cope? My son was diagnosed August, 2009 with Mixed BP (combo of I & II). This is so vey difficult!! His issues are spreading like a fire in our lives now....he has gone to live with my Mom, she has put him out for his disrespect as he cursed her and acted as if he was going to hit her. He has pulled a knife on me...he was removed from my house early '09 but returned in August, due to his "theatrical stunts".... Long story short, he refuses RX because he says he is not "crazy or retarded".  He has quit high school as he should be graduating this year.... The icing on the cake is that he is using drugs (initially marijuana, mucinex, hydrocodone) just name a few... This has been pure torture... Needless to say, people that I have in my corneer including family have backed away from me, because of his violent disruptive behavior.I'm ready to
walk away and let him be in his own glory until he accepts there is a problem!  I'm tired of living like this.... Does anyone have any suggestions?????
Avatar universal
I sympathize, Renee.  Fortunately, our son was not violent during his teen years; he was actually a very sweet person much of the time, though usually giddy and probably hypomanic by today's terms.  

In a way, though, it would have been better if he had acted out violently then, because we would have been able to get treatment for him while he was still a minor.  As it happens, he didn't become profane, abusive, and violent until he was about 22 and away at college, when things went from bad to worse.  With us he became quite uneven:  Sometimes he was sweet, sometimes completely objectionable.

The sad thing is that by then we had no legal control regarding his health care, and since he refused to accept his official diagnosis at age 25, there was nothing we could do and nothing we could learn from his doctor or therapist.  HIPAA rules prohibit sharing such information without many kinds of official signed forms--and our son insisted he was not sick, therefore there was nothing to be discussed.

In the next ten years, his condition has waxed and waned, but gradually become worse.  Now, he cannot hold jobs or friends and lives on the edge of poverty.  Amazingly enough, he has married a girl who matches his temperament quite well, and as near as we can tell, they are still together.  But as we learned in family counseling sessions in the last few years, when he is manic, his thoughts always turn to us.  In his mind, he is a teenager and being abused, screamed at, and tormented by us.  He does not remember that we adored him and loved raising him, or that we have not spent any time in the same house with him for some fifteen years.  His memories of a traumatic childhood are very real to him, which makes him dangerous to us now.  He has admitted having homicidal thoughts about me sometimes, and the last time he saw his father, he physically attacked him twice and the police had to be called.

Our son has fortunately moved to a slightly distant town, and we quite literally have not even seen him for seven months.

What I am going to say will only apply if your son is a minor (as I assume he is, being a high schooler):  Considering that he has pulled a knife on you and threatened his own grandmother, I would strongly suggest that you seek very aggressive treatment for him while he is still young.  By that I mean I would counsel you to talk with your psychiatrist about the possibility of psychiatric hospitalization for treatment, on grounds of 'danger to self or others.'  

There is no guarantee that such treatment will absolutely assure that your child will accept his illness in the future, but I do say that if we had had such an opportunity, we would have taken the chance, because as it is, our beautiful and near-brilliant son seems to have lost the future that should have been his.
Avatar universal
@ Yarrow..... We initially started with counseling one on one; then we would periodically do counseling with myself, my son and therapist...until he exploded so back, the therapist declined to see him anymore.  His "taste" to attempt suicide by overdosing on Tylenol PM lead him to a local mental health hospital. He was discharged after two weeks.  He was @ home for approx. 3.5 months when he overdosed on mucinex; he was sent to a group after two weeks.  Things were fine when he was @ group home. I had monthly counseling sessions to discuss progress. Once he turned 16 @ group home everything changed; he started running away; he even mad his way back to our home which was over 25 miles away. Once he made it to our home, he was greeted by the police because he was reported as a runaway; he has marijuana on his person and he was given a free pass to go to group home with a citation for possession of marijuana or go to jail; he chose to group home.  He was back @ the group home when he decided to run away the following day stating he was going to commit suicide; he the police captured him; he went back to the hospital, but he was discharged the next morning as he conveyed he wants to come back to our home. He went back to group home next morning and later that afternoon he decided to run again however he decided to run into the group homes moving van straight the windshield; he was taken to a mental hospital again.  However, while a the last hospital he broke a bullet proof glass... He was discharged and sent back to me.  Oh my goodness, since the last stint @ the hospital he has been arrested twice and we actually have to Court next week.  It goes without saying, I love my son wholeheartedly, hands down.... I miss the little boy I brought into this world. He is so very intelligent. He used to be a happy boy; honor roll student; very jovial... I always tell him that I long to see him again.  In the state where we reside he is considered a Quasi Adult; therefore I can't force him unless he attempts to hurt himself.  The police weren't as the goal is not to send him to jail, I honestly don't want him there!!!  He is almost @ the point where he's going to age out! I have fiound Level IV facilities but once they get info on what has happened they won't take him indicating that he is too violent.  I really am @ a  lost.  I want to help him, but I don't know what else to do... Thx, Make it a beautiful day!!
Avatar universal
Geez, that's a lot for you and your boy to have gone through in these last couple of years!  And it's too bad that he's considered a quasi-adult in your state.  Still, it sounds to me as though he has indicated strongly several times, by word and deed, that he is in fact attempting to hurt himself. Could you make a case for involuntary commitment on that basis?  It does sound to me as though this youngster is desperate, as you must be, too.

What do others here on the board think about involuntary hospitalization in a situation like this?
1474276 tn?1287050410
I'm on Cymbalta 60 mg, lamictal 100 mg, and clonazepam 2 mg twice a day.  When she upped my Cymbalta (doubled it), I just got more depressed.  This week has been a little better, but I can tell as the season gets closer to winter, the worse it gets.  Do y'all think therapy helps any?
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Bipolar Disorder Community

Top Mood Disorders Answerers
Avatar universal
Arlington, VA
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
15 signs that it’s more than just the blues
Discover the common symptoms of and treatment options for depression.
We've got five strategies to foster happiness in your everyday life.
Don’t let the winter chill send your smile into deep hibernation. Try these 10 mood-boosting tips to get your happy back
For people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), the COVID-19 pandemic can be particularly challenging.
A list of national and international resources and hotlines to help connect you to needed health and medical services.