Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
610654 tn?1270480027

what does my MRI report mean?

i had craniotomy for GBM in june 08
since then i started chemo and radiotherapy,and everything gone so well......
i started taken temodal since august 08,till february 09,my situation is fine...
i took an MRI last week,and the report said the following:
   THE RIGHT TEMPORAL LOBE MASS IS STILL SEEN.THE CYSTIC PART REMAINS UNCHANGED WHILE THE ENHANCING PART HAS PARTIALLY REGRESSED.
   THERE IS SIGNIFICANT INCREASE IN SIZE OF THE ENHANCING LESION AT THE RIGHT PARA VENTICULAR REGION.IT SHOWS MARKED SUUROUNDING EDEMA.IT MEASURES ABOUT 1.8CM
CONCLUSION:PARTIAL REGRESSION OF THE PRIMARY TUMOR.
INCREASE IN SIZE OF THE RIGHT PARAVENTRICULAR LESION SUGGESTIVE OF DISEASE PROGRESSION...
        that was the report....the dr told that there is something in my brain and according to that he decide to switch me from temodal to vencristine I.V. and procarbazine,so does that make any sence??to switch me directly to a harmfull drug and to undergo severe side effects...??
i read about brain tumors and i knew that the patient should continue taking P.O. medications at least for one year...so i doubt about taking this medicine...so my question is can i refuse taking this medicine??and is there any other option??the doctor said that i can wait for 3 months without medicine but it is risky....
  i am suspicious about the last MRI i was taken especially there was a trainer using machine and i felt she didnt know how to use it....and the one was responsible about her punished her coz she didnt take the images right but they didnt tell me anything i just heared that.....so should i repeat the MRI  to make sure that the image was right??
please help....
3 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
Ask you doctor why the switch and tell him about the MRI snafu. Did he see the images or just look at the report?
Still, the MRI takes 3mm slices and the tumor is larger than that.
Did anything else change besides your MRI as far as bloodwork? Was anything discussed? After all, you need to be a partner in your care and understand why the treatment was changed. And make the doctor understand if the MRI was lousy. Still, usually that impacts picture quality and they were able to see things. I have had some that were almost entirely black. Did you get a copy?
It is your option, certainly, to get other opinions.
Helpful - 0
610654 tn?1270480027
thanks for ur care...
the doctor didnt see the images he only read the report and upon that he decided what to give me
my bloodwork is good,there is no change,neither in liver enzymes or kidney function....also there is no other symptoms indicating that there is something....even i expeccted that the doctor will give me a rest from chemotherapy becoz of my good health.....i feel improvement more than anyone else....so that makes me feel doubt about what the doctor is doing...i felt that there is some plan in his mind or protocol and he wants to apply it on me!!!!!
first he told me that the tumor in increasing in size and then he told me that it could me an inflammation or edema and we cant till.....!!!!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
If there is doubt, the person to ask is the doctor, or someone in the doctor's office - is there a nurse or advocate that you can approach to ask as to why the sudden change?
Sounds like he is being conservative.
Helpful - 0
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Brain/Pituitary Tumors Community

Top Cancer Answerers
Avatar universal
Northern, NJ
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Here are 15 ways to help prevent lung cancer.
New cervical cancer screening guidelines change when and how women should be tested for the disease.
They got it all wrong: Why the PSA test is imperative for saving lives from prostate cancer
Everything you wanted to know about colonoscopy but were afraid to ask
A quick primer on the different ways breast cancer can be treated.
Get the facts about this disease that affects more than 240,000 men each year.