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What are the effects of Ativan?

Hello today I went to the er because I had some food stuck in my esophagus. I have EoE (eosinophilic esophagitis) so this has happened before. But it was stuck for longer than usually and I started getting anxious. I have anxiety and Lexapro to help manage it (it works really well) by the time I get to the er I've already calmed down but the doctor came in with a shot and said it would help calm me and relieve the pressure on my throat. A couple minutes later I felt like I was gonna fall my body felt weird and hot I was dizzy and started to vomit. I went to the washroom to wash my mouth out( I also tried some water with went down easy) after a couple minutes of feeling fine they sent me home. The vomit must of clear the blockage but i just wanted to know if this was normally what the medicine does or if I had some kind of reaction to it
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Avatar universal
Everyone is affected differently by medication.  Ativan ( or lorazapam) is a benzodiazpam and should relax you via gaba receptors.
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Avatar universal
Everyone is affected differently by medication.  Ativan ( or lorazapam) is a benzodiazpam and should relax you via gaba receptors.
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