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How common is it for gynecomastia to persist after puberty?

I'm 25 years old, and I have had gynecomastia (I'm not sure if it has come and gone or I just go a long time forgetting about it) since I was a teenager. I remember my pediatrician dismissing it when I was in school.

I also remember getting it looked at again, either it left and came back, or I just forgot about it until my anxiety problems started, when I was 19 or 20. At that point my doctor even performed a mammogram to be sure it wasnt anything serious and that came back with no results, so I ignored it for a while longer.

The last month or so I've noticed it again (or it came back, again I'm not sure), after a couple years of homelessness, and not exactly living as well as I could. I didnt eat well due to homelessness, the food I did get being unhealthy food, work was my exercise, sleeping in the backseat of a Camry.

To be honest, it being there at 25 does worry me a lot. Is gynecomastia at this age something to worry about? A sign of worse things? I would also be glad to hear from other people who have had this condition after puberty but before the older ages when it becomes more common
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Gynecomastia usually (but not always) recedes in late puberty, usually 1 - 3 yrs after it first appears.  In some teens and in grown men it may persist indefinitely.  It's important to note that changes in weight can substantially alter the appearance of gynecomastic breasts, and, in some men, there is an inborn tendency for fat (not breast tissue) to deposit about the breasts when they gain weight.  So it is important to ascertain whether this is in fact  gynecomastia or a manifestation of weight gain/weight loss.  Changing appearance as you describe favors "fatty breasts" over gynecomastia; but breast tissue is distinctly firmer and circumscribed whereas just fat deposits are soft and have no sharp delineations so the way it feels is important to tell the difference.
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Its worth noting that I only have this happening on one side of my chest. The area is sensitive,, with pressing around the nipple causing discomfort, and it feels much firmer underneath the fat on that side than the other side, with it hurting if I bump that side of my chest as well. Thats what made me think its gynecomastia either coming back or just never leaving at all.
Interesting.  That's gynecomastia for sure because fat deposits are symmetric.  Gynecomastia can often be unilateral. You probably have "permanent" gyneomastia on that side.  Surgical excision is the only remedy I am familiar with for that. If occurring due to a particular  medication or frequent pot use, cessation of that agent may possibly reduce it (at least reduce the tenderness part).
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