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Thyroid Disorders Community
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Avatar universal

Has anyone healed their hypo specifically Hashi's?

Hello everyone! I'm new to this site, but have enjoyed the information so far. Has anyone successfully healed their Hashimotos? I am working on it, but still in the extremely early phase of doing so. I'm doing it blindly and kind of learning as I go. I akso have PCOS so hoping it will help in that arear as well so I can have some babaiea. Any help is appreciated!
13 Responses
649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
I'm sorry to tell you that there is no cure for Hashimoto's.  It's an autoimmune disease in which the body sees the thyroid as foreign and produces antibodies to destroy it.  The antibodies destroy thyroid tissue, so it gradually produces less and less thyroid hormones, leaving the patient with hypothyroidism.

Once you develop hypothyroidism, your doctor will prescribe you some type of thyroid replacement medication.  As long as your levels are at a good place for you, there's no reason you can't have babies.

An underlying problem with PCOS is a hormonal imbalance. Women with PCOS make more androgens than normal, which affects development and release of eggs during ovulation.  High insuln levels may also be linked to PCOS, which in turn causes higher androgen levels.  

Are you on medication for either hypothyroidism or PCOS?  Hypothyroidism would be treated with, most likely, some type of T4, levothyroxine medication.  PCOS is often treated with metformin, which helps lower insulin levels.

If you  have current thyroid hormone labs, please post them, for us, so we can see your status.  Be sure to include reference ranges, which vary lab to lab and have to come from your own report.
1756321 tn?1547095325
Diet Doctor has an interesting article "Is It Possible to Recover from Hypothyroidism?" which is worth reading. The article ends in a poll (LCHF stands for low carb high fat) which I posted below.

Diet Doctor also has articles about PCOS success stories of weight loss/falling pregnant when switching to a LCHF diet.  I personally have noted improvements in my hypothyroid symptoms from getting off the foods that kept my insulin high. :)

"After I started an LCHF diet I...

...had to increase the hormone dose a lot.  5.96%  (9 votes)

...had to increase the dose a bit  12.58%  (19 votes)

...need the same dose.  48.34%  (73 votes)

...could decrease the dose a bit.  13.91%  (21 votes)

...could decrease the dose a lot.  8.61%  (13 votes)

...could stop taking thyroid hormone.  10.6%  (16 votes)

Total Votes: 151"
649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
Of course, anyone, especially those with an insulin issue, should choose a low glycemic diet, which is one that centers on foods that don't spike blood glucose levels, which, in turn, spikes insulin levels.  The high glycemic foods tend to be those containing sugar, and other simple carbs that break down/are digested quickly.  Complex carbs (such as vegetable and whole grains), on the other hand, do not spike blood sugar and should be eaten freely.   It should be noted that fat can also increase insulin levels when eaten in excess.

Any dietary change for the better is always a good thing, but anyone planning to "cure" Hashimoto's via diet, supplements, etc will end up being very disappointed.
1756321 tn?1547095325
I too heard about a high fat diet as a cause of insulin resistance and I'd say I'd agree with that if it was a high transfat diet since that man made fat is replacing the saturated fat in the cell membranes and causing havoc with glucose getting into the cells.

But there are various low carb high fat diets such as Atkins, LCHF, Ketogenic, Paleo and if any of these diets saw insulin rise then you wouldn't be losing weight any time soon!  The Swedish government recognises the LCHF diet (based on a 2 year review of 16,000 nutrition studies) as suitable for type 2 diabetes, improving heart health markers, weight loss or maintaining weight.
649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
I'm not sure it really matters whether it's trans fat or not, though we all know that trans fat is bad for us, in any amount (one molecule from being plastic... eewww).  From what I've been reading, the jury is still out on the high fat diet.  Mercola is the only one I've seen, recently, who really pushes it.

"Fat has little, if any, effect on blood glucose levels, although a high fat intake does appear to contribute to insulin resistance."

Then there's this, by a diabetes expert:

"Pizza. A hot fudge sundae. Movie theater popcorn. Cheesesteaks wit (hey, I’m a Philly guy).

What do they all have in common? More than being mighty tasty, they’re also loaded with fat. Fat doesn’t usually receive a whole lot of attention from those on intensive insulin programs; carbs seem to get all the glory. And deservedly so: Carbs cause a rapid rise in blood glucose, while fat seems to have little effect. Or does it?

You may have noticed that your blood glucose level rises overnight after a restaurant meal. Or perhaps it climbs excessively in the evening after having a big piece of birthday cake during the day. The culprit is most likely the fat content of these types of meals and snacks, not the carbohydrates.

It has long been known that adding fat to a meal will slow down the digestion/absorption of carbohydrates. This is due to a slowdown in gastric emptying – the rate at which food passes from the stomach into the intestines, where the nutrients (such as glucose) are absorbed into the bloodstream. This is why the carbohydrates in high-fat meals tend to take longer to raise the blood glucose level. But the difference is generally an hour or two: Whereas a low-fat meal will raise the blood glucose level quickly (usually within an hour), a high-fat meal may take two to four hours to produce a blood sugar peak.

So what about after the carbohydrates are finished doing their thing? That’s when the fat itself begins to exert its effects. The process goes something like this:

    You eat a high-fat meal or snack (this is the fun part).
    In a few hours, the fat begins to digest; this continues for several hours.
    The level of fat in the bloodstream (triglycerides) rises.
    High triglycerides in the bloodstream cause the liver to become resistant to insulin.
    When the liver is insulin resistant, it produces and secretes more glucose than usual.
    The blood glucose rises steadily as the liver’s glucose output goes up.

This is what causes the gradual, delayed blood glucose rise after consumption of large amounts of fat. The response seems to be “dose-dependent” – the more fat you consume, the more insulin resistant the liver becomes, and the more glucose it produces. The type of fat also appears to play a role. Saturated fats (the type found in dairy and animal products) seem to cause more insulin resistance than monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (the type found in vegetable products).

So what can be done about it? The obvious answer is to cut back on portions of fatty foods, and choose foods containing healthier types of fats. But when confronted with your favorite culinary indulgence from time to time, you can still partake and manage your blood glucose level reasonably well."

It seems that no matter which camp one sits in, on the matter, there are articles or studies "proving" the other incorrect or inadequate.  From where I sit and from my own experience (with my son, diagnosed with Type I diabetes at age 10, a nephew with type I, 2 sisters and a brother with type II and myself with insulin resistance/pre-diabetes - and all but my son with weight issues), it's best to eliminate the sugar and starchy foods and eat everything else in moderation.  I have gotten my own blood sugar levels back under control using a "moderate" protocol.  I don't shun fats (except trans fats), but neither do I eat a high fat diet - that would cause my doctor to have a heart attack, since my triglycerides are higher than normal, as it is -- probably means I'm still eating too much of all kinds of fat and my liver can't process it.

At any rate, while insulin resistance (as well as PCOS) can be turned around or significantly improved via the diet route and we'll all feel better eating a healthier diet, making sure we get adequate vitamins/minerals, etc, that doesn't change the fact that there is no cure for Hashimoto's and once damage has been done to thyroid tissue no diet, supplements or other means will return it to normal function and I always feel that it's misleading to imply otherwise.
1756321 tn?1547095325
I was very happy to see Time Magazine's June 2014 front cover "Eat Butter. Scientists Labeled Fat the Enemy. Why They Were Wrong." They sure were wrong alright. Your doctor sounds fat phobic. Aren't most doctors? :)

A good article from Diet Doctor: “You Have Literally Saved My Life” about the lab results that improved switching to LCHF...

"My overall stats to date include a notable reduction in Total Cholesterol down from 267 mg/dl (6.9 mmol/l) down to 162 mg/dl (4.2 mmol/l) - and an improvement in triglycerides from 478 mg/dl (5.4 mmol/l) down to 97 mg/dl (1.1 mmol/l)

My weight is down from 200 lbs (91 kg) to 166 lbs (75 kg).

My blood pressure down from 160/120 (for the last 5 years!) to 120/80 (consistently for the last 6 months).

My doctor was sceptical at the start – and having seen the results first hand – has asked me to send them the link.  My heart attack ‘risk’ has dropped from 15% to under 3% – and I will be continuing to find ways to refine my health by adding some additional exercise."

And this is a good article too :One Year on an LCHF Diet with Type 1 Diabetes...

"Today I celebrate 1 year with LCHF, or I could say that I celebrate 1 year in good health! I can certainly endorse the LCHF diet as being good for type 1 diabetics.

Besides a more stable blood sugar and a more easily managed diabetes, I’ve gotten rid of pain in my legs, headaches, GI problems, and constant throat infections. Previously, I had recurring yeast infections, but during this past year I haven’t had a single one!

I only need one injection daily, instead of the previous 5-9. I eat delicious food, and I don’t miss anything. I have more energy and I’m happier than ever before! During the past year I’ve also gotten to know, and come in contact with, a lot of great people through Instagram and my blog!

I could go on about more positive things, but now I’m off to make dinner. A fatty, smoked rainbow trout to honor the day!"

It is just one way to improve health so I highly question all the experts since the proof is rather in the pudding."



649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
From what I'm seeing, so far, like so many things, it's mostly anecdotal; I have yet to see the actual scientific studies, but then I haven't looked real hard for them, either.  But that's okay.  As long as my triglycerides remain in the upper 200's or even into the 300's, I will assume that I need not be loading my body with more fat that my liver isn't equipped to handle.

1756321 tn?1547095325
There are plenty of studies on low carb high fat diets showing that weight goes down, triglycerides go down, HDL (good) cholesterol goes up, and cardiovascular health improves. Sweden recommended the diet after looking at all the studies but clinical evidence as well.


649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
"At any rate, while insulin resistance (as well as PCOS) can be turned around or significantly improved via the diet route and we'll all feel better eating a healthier diet, making sure we get adequate vitamins/minerals, etc, that doesn't change the fact that there is no cure for Hashimoto's and once damage has been done to thyroid tissue no diet, supplements or other means will return it to normal function and I always feel that it's misleading to imply otherwise. "
Avatar universal
Thanks for your input Barb. I take both Armour and Synthroid for the thyroid issues. I have never had results with metformin as I took it for possible ovulation as I'm not insulin resistent so I no longer take that. Years of fertility treatments previously didn't work, in addition I have a few more female issues which I cant control so I'm just trying to prevent any further damage. I'm confident while I may not be able to fully undo the damage I can prevent any further or at least make the current issues better.
Avatar universal
Thanks for your input Barb. I take both Armour and Synthroid for the thyroid issues. I have never had results with metformin as I took it for possible ovulation as I'm not insulin resistent so I no longer take that. Years of fertility treatments previously didn't work, in addition I have a few more female issues which I cant control so I'm just trying to prevent any further damage. I'm confident while I may not be able to fully undo the damage I can prevent any further or at least make the current issues better. I've had both issues for over 20 years.
Avatar universal
I currently eat only organic whole foods and avoid soy, dairy and animal products. Our primary diet is fruit, vegetables, seeds, and nuts.
649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
Adequate thyroid hormones will make your current issues better; if you still have symptoms of hypothyroidism, you may need an increase in your one of your thyroid hormone dosages.  Free T3 is the hormone that's used directly by the cells, and that's the one that correlates best with symptoms.  If you care to post your levels, with reference ranges, we might be able to help you with those.

I might also suggest that you get tested and begin supplementing vitamin B-12, since many/most people who don't eat meat products are deficient (or become deficient), since there are few, if any reliable and absorbable plant sources of vitamin B12.
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649848 tn?1534633700
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