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676032 tn?1315674063

any input appreciated..

I have Hypothyroidism and so does my dad...  My sister is currently having all the common hypothyroid symptoms.. weight gain regardless of diet and exercise,  fatigue,  depression, mood swing, constipation,  and headaches. She had her thyroid checked a few months ago and her tsh was 2.6.. she got it checked again two weeks ago and its was 1.48 t4 was 17 (range 9-19 I think).. shes feeling hopeless at this because she doesnt know whats going on.

I have suggested she get her antibodies checked as its a big jump from 2.6 down to 1.48 .. I am wondering is it worth her while getting her antibodies checked.. could it be hashimotos? ??

Also is 2.6 tsh high for someone with a functioning thyroid? ?

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Avatar universal
I suggest that, along with the antibodies tests (TPO ab and TG ab), she should be tested for Free T3, Free T4, Vitamin D, B12, ferritin, magnesium, and a full iron test panel.  
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676032 tn?1315674063
My thyroid is grand iv been on meds for it since 2008. My dad was dx a few months ago so is in the process of gettng it sorted.

Im just concerned as my sister never suffered from headaches and now constantly has them.  Shes been referred for a brain mri.

I will suggest she get an antibody test done. I know they thyroid can cause some crazy stuff.  I had a bad experience with mine ..

Thanks.
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1756321 tn?1547095325
My TPO antibodies were 470 (< 60 normal) when my TSH in the mid 2's.
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Avatar universal
TSh is a pituitary hormone that is supposed to accurately reflect levels of the biologically active thyroid hormones, Free T3 and Free T4; however, TSH cannot be shown to correlate well with either Free T3 or Free T4, much less with symptoms, which are the most important.  Free T3 is the most important of the three tests because it drives metabolism of every cell in the body.  Scientific studies have shown that Free T3 correlated best with hypo symptoms, while Free T4 and TSH did not correlate at all.  

Although the TSH and FT4 test do not indicate an issue, the most important indicator, symptoms,  surely do, so I'd suggest further testing.  Since Hasimoto's is the most common cause for diagnosed hypothyroidism,  it would be a good idea to test for that just to rule it in or our.  The specific tests for Hashi's are TPO ab and TG ab.  She should also request to be tested for Free T3 and Free T4 each time she goes in for tests.  Also a good idea to get a copy of each lab test and write on there how she is feeling and what meds/supplements were being taken at the time.  These then become very valuable for future reference.  Since hypo patients are also frequently too low in the ranges for Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin, she should get those done as well.

When test results are available, please post results and their reference ranges and members will be glad to help interpret and advise further.  

By the way, it is admirable that you are so concerned for your sister, but how about yourself and your dad?  Are you two being tested and treated adequately to relieve hypo symptoms?  

  
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