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quitting drinking and tiredness
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quitting drinking and tiredness

I was just wondering.....  I quit drinking 3 months ago.....  i used to drink daily, then i cut down to just the weekends....  i never woke up and started drinking, but i would drink heavily most of the time when i did drink.  back then, when i was not drinking, i was tired, and then i would drink and i would wake up.
now that i have not been drinking, i am ALWAYS tired.  I am not over weight, i eat pretty healthy, work out 3-4 times a week, take vitamins and drink a lot of water.  i have even had my blood tested and everything is in order...... and yet, i am still, always so tired....  i don't understand what is wrong with me or even if the not drinking and tiredness are related.....  the only time that i feel good is right after a refrshing shower or after i have a latte.  :-(  i want my energy back.....  
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190885_tn?1333029491
i would get tested for hep c...that will make you tired...lack of energy...maybe your just depresed..that will make you tired..you might have to just give the no drinking more time...i would think your body needs at least 6 months .......good luck...billy
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Avatar_n_tn
thank you for your reply.  i have already been tested for hep c and i am negative for that.....  well, i guess i can just see how the next three months will go.....  
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Avatar_f_tn
alcohol has a lot of refined white sugar in it...i have read in book written in late 80's Eating Right to Live Sober by Anne Mueller that when people come off it these residues of sugar remain in body until sobriety and good diet banishes them.the exercise and lots of water drinking is very good.....keep that up along with good diet sans the alcohol and i bet u'll feel better soon.Alcohol also destroys brain cells that do regenerate!I'm living proof!:)))))
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318928_tn?1248181016
Ibizan has good advice.  Get your diet straightened out.  Also, you don't mention how long you were drinking.  Keep in mind that your brain and body has been abused by the excessive drinking.  You need to increase the niacin, B6, B12 and all the other fun B vitamins, alcohol depleted those.  If you are a woman, you have to monitor your iron intake. Your body can't absorb the iron without the Vit B & C.  You will probably benefit from some OJ with an iron supplement.  It takes a long time for the body to recover and start functioning after drinking.  Everyone is different as far as recovery.  
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Avatar_f_tn
Your tiredness could be the result of depression since you are grieving something that became so much a part of your life.  I am going through major grieving right now as a result of giving up alcohol and nicotine.  I am definitely off-schedule and very tired.  I am aware that it may take a year for my body to get everything straightened out and get back on schedule.  That is great though that you are able to exercise 3-4x per week, on top of the fact that you have been successful in your sobriety!  Good luck.
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Avatar_f_tn
Caitlin tripped my memory...alcohol is a central nervous system depressant and brain like sponge soaking it up while it destroys cells.These cells do regenerate  in time but in early sobriety person feels very off kilter.....depressed...anxious....xcessive caffeine and snack foods will aggravate this but u ber has good advice with what she's reccomending with the vitamins and diet.remember u like us didn't get the way we did overnite so with time sobriety and good nutrition u will feel better!
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Avatar_m_tn
I am in the same boat as you. I am on day 110 of not drinking alcohol. I used to just drink on week ends, about 24 to 30 beers each week end. Now that I have stopped drinking I get tired easily and am ready for bed a 10 pm every night. By 9:30pm I have to fight to keep my eyes open. Before I would go to bed at midnight and still have a difficult time sleeping and be up by 6am. Now I have a hard time just getting up by 7:30am. I don't know if this is good or bad.

One other thing that used to happen to me. when I was drinking just on week ends. During the week when I wasn't drinking I would wake up two to three time in the middle of the night absolutely drenched with sweat. I got to the point that I would go to bed with towels next to me to dry off the sweat. After about thirty days of not drinking at all this no longer happened to me. I don't know if this was withdrawal from not drinking alcohol during the week or some other side effect of the alcohol.  Anyone have any idea what caused the night time sweating episodes?
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Avatar_f_tn
u drank that much for how long?months?a few years?any other drugs or misuse of RX medication or use of RX medication?what u described is a withdrawal from alcohol.....30 days is not uncommon for what happened to u to happen!
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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks izban. That was helpful.

I usually would drink about 24 to 30 beers in total Friday and Saturday. I was drinking that much for about 5 years. No drinks at all Sunday through Thursday. I took no other drugs or medication nor do I smoke cigarettes. I didn't realize it but I must have been physically addicted to alcohol and withdrawing during the week. Now that you mention it I did not wake up sweating when I went to bed after a night of drinking.
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Avatar_f_tn
thats a lotta brewskis there!when u were drunk u would just conk out with all that in u.....imagine the body and the brain is like a giant soaked sponge from drinking.....when u stop soaking the sponge it will wring itself out!hence your body....my body...our bodies here of recovering folks posting... the former sponges!i had very bad insomnia and anxiety after stopping all the alcohol/drug use...and i really had to watch the caffeine and chocolate for that aggravated it as well!it took me about 6-9 months to get in2 a regular sleeping pattern.I found that reading helped.....read til eyes got real heavy and nitey nite!
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Avatar_m_tn
Ask youre doctor if you have Hypo Throid. That sounds like you might have it. Have a blood test on that because I have hypo throid. I felt very depressed and tired. Also I was losing hair. Have that checked. out.
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Avatar_m_tn
Alcohol effects the central nervous system, and I've come to believe that it takes some time for your body to readjust.  Like you, I would become more awake after a night of drinking although in the end, I would wake up with extreme anxiety (at the end of my daily drinking days).  I honestly think that it will pass with time.  

Have you ever heard of PAWS?  It stands for Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome.  Google it when you get a chance.  It discusses the many changes that your body goes through when you remove alcohol from your life.  
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243614_tn?1266201137
Hey Penny, lots of good advice on here for you.  I know my doc told me to take b complex, b1, b6, and i also give myself a b-12 shot twice a month.  It could be a combination of alot of things for you.  Depression had me so down i couldn't get out of it and had no energy at all.  So that could also be a biggie for you.  Talk to your doc and if they can't help you, get another doc.  Sometimes it takes that to get real help.
Good wishes to you.  Please keep posting.  I have been without a drink 8 days shy of 2 months and i feel like I am a walking miracle.  It can be done and you can get there too.  Heck you are well on your way with 3 mos. sobriety. congrats on that.  Tjack
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1354461_tn?1291056987
I am 51 and have been drinking fairly steady since age 13 with a few Months off in-between the many years of heavy drinking. I have worked very hard in factory and shipping in the printing industry in excess of 26 years. I often worked twelve hour days voluntarily for the money. Of course, in this type of working situation, one meets many friends and drinking after work is just part of job, I think, or so I thought..

Bottom line: I am now not working due to medical reasons and for the last 5 years have drank the most in my life. This included on average 15 beers per day for a base and often mixed drinks with gin, vodka, tequilla or rum or a bottle or two of red merlot. Often drank from am to pm with a nap ( possible pass out ) in-between. My last drink was on May 30th, 2010. I also ate so I did get some nutrition.
This time, 22 days is the longest I have quit in a row in many, many years.

I realize my drinking was extreme and I probably should not have went cold turkey but I read some and took some valuim and thiamin etc while coming off of it. I imagine my body is still quite toxic but I really don't feel so good yet.
Kind of wondering how long it will take to feel normal.

As I read, I see many of you are experiencing some of the same things.

I just wanted to thank you all for all your great comments. I am all alone 10-12 hours a day with a boat load of booze in the house and not drinking it gets difficult.
My problems seems to be, once I start drinking, quitting is not an option until I am loaded.

Reading things like this helps keep me from not opening a bottle when I feel discouraged.

I too, am going through tough changes.
I was wondering why I am so......tired all the time. I also have big time body pain and headaches.
I just started walking 1 mile per day, I take multi-vitamins, thiamin, calsium, d, fish oil and unfortunately 3 blood pressure pills and 1 cholesterol pill.

The sick part of this all is in the back of my mind I think if I can get myself healthy again, maybe there is a chance I will be able to drink socialably again one day, however, if I stay true to myself, I am thinking this may not be the case.

Thx again for having a place for people like me to read for support.
I do appreciate your comments and good luck to all of you.
Guess what, I now have to take a quick nap to keep functioning and will check back again later..
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Avatar_m_tn
I think the amount of time will vary by person, depending on your metabolize, genetics, how much you drank, and how much damage you did.  During my first real detox, it took over a month to feel better.  At the end of 5 weeks, I started drink on/and off to a lesser extent so I never got to experience true recovery.  Next time through, I had a liver problem and I was tired the whole time.  The last time I stopped (and I plan to stay stopped) it took about 6 weeks to feel really decent.

I think this gets harder on us as we age, and also harder when we pick it up and put it back down.  One thing that helped me "stay stopped" is journaling about all of my drinking experiences over the last few years.  In doing this, I was able to stop fooling myself into thinking I could drink normally.......all the evidence pointed to the contrary.  

Stay the course Mellon58, and consider getting some blood tests to see how things are functioning.  If you have any problems from the alcohol consumption, you're best off being aware of them and treating them. It's your best chance for recovery.

By the way, get rid of the booze in your house- dump it out (I'm serious about that).  Good job on your 3+ weeks!
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Avatar_f_tn
jacker is right on......get rid of all the booze in the house......it has invisible tentacles.....and i don't think u can be a social drinker in the near future.Google PAWS..Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome.....read..and see if any of the info applies to u!
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Avatar_f_tn
i myself have been thinking the same as mellen 58 if i have a few months off the drink and my lfts come back normal, which they have done in the past, does that allow me to drink in the future, but i know that its the little demons that seem to reside in my brain sometimes,  telling me it will be fine. i am going on holiday in 6 weeks to quite a lively tourist area i have been looking forward to it for months, but somehow since ive decided to give up its not seeming to appealing. i know thats sad, but im worried how im going to get through the week without drinking cause i know the people that i will be with will be. drinking loads and im the sort of person that 1 drink will lead to 10  from day 1 to day 7 hence the reason for quitting. anyone got any tips
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Avatar_f_tn
i think its highly unlikely that u can go on a vacation with heavy drinkers and not drink.If you really want to quit drinking u will mus not go with these ppl!thats the only sane tip i have for u!
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Avatar_f_tn
oops!typos!i meant to say you must not go with these ppl if u want to stop drinking!
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Avatar_m_tn
I spent years thinking like this.  I'd take a break, and then tell myself that I was "okay now" and that I could control myself.  Your alcoholic brain will often lie to you, and all you have to do is look at the evidence. If you always end up in the same place, then you have your answer.  I have to say that I agree with Ibizan- it's too early to be around alcohol.  You might be able to handle it when you are firmly established in sobriety and know who you are, but it takes some time.  Don't tempt yourself.  Do everything within your power to stay sober for now, and make it your first priority.  You need time to grow.  
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1323047_tn?1279197519
I don't know if you know Tenerife, it's a 'party' island. The nightclub is opposite out apartment! We went last year and ok I did it, I stayed in every night in bed with a book not drinking and listening to a party atmosphere going on around me. It wasn't easy. I have refused to go this year and have booked a house for my husband and I up in Scotland with the two dogs!

The benefit of not drinking was that I was the first one in the pool every morning in Tenerife!
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1354461_tn?1291056987
Thank you so much for your thoughts. Jacker, it makes since to journal about journeys down the alcoholic path. It does curve my appetite for the drink when I ponder all my experiences. I am starting to be ok with out alcohol for the most part.
It made a lot of since about you quitting drinking and starting back up again and the part about fooling yourself into thinking you can drink normally again. I am still struggling with that demon..

When the thought about having a drink comes into my head, I just get something else to drink and I don't dwell on it or surely I would be mixing one. Thought is 1/3 of the deed.
I don't stock my most dangerous choice of alcohol and that is Miller lite. I used to have 3-4 cases in a fridge at all times. It's way to easy to just have ( one ), and unfortunately one is not in my vocabulary or I would not be on this site.. I have 33 bottles of wine and 3 bottles of vodka in a wine rack locked. Vodka is, however, my second choice of liquor.

I have fatty liver but when I got my blood checked for high blood pressure every 6 months or so, I had quit booze about a week or two prior, drank lots of water and my liver counts came out normal. I guess that is a good thing. Us alcoholic's can be clever when it comes to hiding the amount of alcohol one is drinking. I hear fatty liver can be reversed. I never knew that alcohol broke down into carbohydrates and fats, triglicerides (triglycerides), ( hense the high blood pressure ). I thought surely it would have broke down into sugar.

Ibizan, thank you for your reference to paws. I checked out the site and it also has a lot of good info. It is good to know what to expect and know you are not the only one going through all these aches and pains and emotions.

I feel bad for you Charlie 27 and your vacation delema. For me friends, laughter, little unbrella drinks, snacks and the good life is very hard to resist. I wish you luck!!

I rode my adult trike ( balance issues ) down to the dentist for a cleaning today and actually feel just a little better on day 23 of sobriety. I look forward to getting totally out of the fog.

Thanks again both of you and those of you who take time to read this. I enjoy reading about your experiences and it keeps me focused. Have a good day. I am...so far :)
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Avatar_m_tn
I had fatty liver too, and I remember being very tired during that sober period.  I think your body is healing, at that's a big part of the tiredness.  

It took about 6 months of sobriety for the fatty liver to go away, and I've heard this can vary widely by individual.  I"m not very heavy and I'm very active, so that may have helped me.

Please remember that it's a short walk from Fatty Liver to cirrhosis.  Once that fat turns to scar tissue, the damage is permanent.  As far as what's in your house, that is A LOT of booze!  If you can't bring yourself to pour it out, then why not give it to someone who doesn't have an alcohol problem?  I would not have it in the house.......too much temptation.  I don't mind having alcohol in my fridge prior to a social event, but when the event is over, all of the alcohol goes out the door with the guests.  I don't mind people drinking around me, but I do not want it in my house for any length of time.  
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Avatar_f_tn
how does one know they have a fatty liver, i have had countless liver function tests which have come back normal, im just waiting for my next one to come through, i have had 3 so far this year, not because of my drinking because im rather a secret hypercondriac well i suppose it was because of my drinking but my doc didnt realise i had a problem until last week and sent me for another one. my problem is not how often i drink but how much i drink. i can go for months without drinking as i dont drink at home (unless i am on a binge) and i dont have much of a social life as i have 4 very demanding children, so baby sitters are far and few between. when i do go out i will basically drink myself into oblivion. i dont seem to have any happy medium i go from being merry to completely obliterated. feel still drunk when i wake up so then carry on the next day. i knew this was not right but just couldnt control it. realised this def had to stop when i then carried on the day after that as well. so i would end up on a 3 day binge just from one night out. i then wouldnt drink again for about 4 to 6 weeks then one night of drinking would start it all over again. very very vicious cycle. to purbeck girl i know tenerife its nice there, im going to gran canaria for a friends 30th birthday. which is going to be hard not too drink but im going to give it a go. my counsellor has told me not to beat myself up about it if i do and if i really must just have 2. not really the advice i wanted to hear. its almost giving me permission.  hopefully i can post something in aug saying didnt drink and feel proud of myself. fingers crossed x
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Avatar_m_tn
I'll just answer the medical part for now, in regards to my personal experience.  My bloodwork was always good, but that's because I always knew that I had a blood test coming and I'd abstain from alcohol.  Your liver function (in regard to enzyme levels, etc). will often read normal after some time off.  A person with Cirrhosis of the liver can have normal bloodwork, if all of their "good" liver cells are functioning properly.  In my case, I had sharp pains in my right side under the rib cage. They came and went for some time, but eventually they stayed.  I stopped drinking and the pain actually got more severe.  My bloodwork was normal, so they sent me in for a CT scan and it showed fatty infiltration of the liver.  Actually, your liver has no nerves, but the "sack" that encloses it has nerves and if the texture or size of the liver changes, you can feel pain.

My bloodwork did show low platelets, which is a sign of an enlarged spleen. This is often the case when you have liver issues, because your spleen filters blood through the liver.  When the liver is not functioning correctly, there's a bit of a back-up in the plumbing and your spleen function is effected.  

But a liver issue is one of many problems you can get from too much alcohol consumption.  
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1354461_tn?1291056987
Gm- I wish I would have known that cirrhossis was a short walk from fatty liver disease about 6 years ago. I may have quit sooner.

Charlie the way I found out was I had a high liver bloodwork count when I went in with stomach issues. I was sent in for an ultrasound and that is where they saw the fatty liver.

Jacker, you sure have a lot of valuable information that is both interesting and informative. I am learning and I like that.
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1323047_tn?1279197519
I have been thinking about the brain soaking up alcohol like a sponge all day and am set for a sober evening. Thanks
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Avatar_n_tn
Well I am being treated for alcoholism , my Doctor prescribed Naltraxone , and it really help , but im also on prozac as well cause of issues in my life.

I was binge drinking at weekends drinking upto 20 litres of beer, not sure how much that is in cans,

All i can say is I dont have alcohol in the house now and I avoid the alcohol line at the supermarket.

good luck to everyone
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Avatar_f_tn
I have been an alcoholic for nearly 7 years. Not a long time compared to others, but it has done alot of damage. I've had a few weeks of sober respite. The longest being 3 weeks, and by the end of the three weeks I felt so exhausted, like I needed a crane to lift my feet just to walk. I am now about to start  a recovery program for the third time. I agree that recovery symptoms differ for everyone. I am currently on a regimen of medication to help with some of the physical and emotional symptoms that may have caused my addiction in the first place. It's hard to tell if it helps, and it definitely won't keep me from drinking. Only I can keep myself from taking the first drink. It's time knuckle down and grit my teeth and do this sober thing. My last drink was 3 days ago. Wish me luck and luck to all of you!!!
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Avatar_f_tn
3days is a start!better than no days!u keep it up..one hour at a time....one day at a time!so much good support here for those serious about their recovery as i'm sure u have read!
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Avatar_m_tn
I begin my new journey , i've been sober since 12/08/2010 and reading your comments seem like deja vu . I dont know anyone in this city and feel all alone but remain faithful.
I feel this is a battle that must be fought alone with the help of God. That's right I said it. I believe in God. this sickness requires strength and faith. I have completely eliminated alcohol from my life and my mind. I am determined to fight with the All Mighty next to me.  I hope that the side effects are not as severe as some of you have experienced. but I did notice that I too, im going bald....gonna get some blood tests done and keep you guys up to date, you dont need the twelve steps, I just say no thank you !akcuf ahtum.
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Avatar_f_tn
so glad u've been reading here and have begun ur sobriety journey......stick w/us....there is some very good recovery in this forum and many glad to help u w/whatever they can!:)
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Avatar_n_tn
WOW I have been drinking for too long, heavily since I turned 21 always after work until bed.  I'm 45 now, you've answered so many questions that I've had and didn't know where to find the answers.  My wife drinks daily with me but she doesn't have the issues I feel that are affecting me.  I'm sure my diet doesn't help, but knowing the drinking is affecting my triglycerides which were very high in December 2010 has me concerned.  My blood work came back OK...just have to knock it off a drink at a time for a cpl to three days then knock another drink off...It's the elephant in the room and I have to address the situation before it's too late!  Thank You everyone for all you've written!  Wish me luck!  I'm scared to death!
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Avatar_m_tn
This a great thread and really inspiring.

I've been drinking to pass-out stage most days for about the last 25 years , but I watched an excellent series on the beeb called 'Inside the Human Body' made me appreciate that I was damaging myself. I stopped drinking the next day (after passing out on the sofa again!!!).

Today is my 14th day of sobriety and it's damn hard, I feel like I've been out the night before on a massive bender and passed-out then rolled down a big hill (it's happened before), but feel like it everyday. Dehydrated, headaches and sore. I'm glad to read that this is just part of the process.

Good luck to everyone.
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Avatar_f_tn
u keep going dude!all of us here in recovery have been where ur at in the past...its all one hour atta time...one day atta time!stay w/us here...we can help if u but let us and do ur best to help urself......good recovery here!
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1708072_tn?1307921020
i've been sober now for 4 months and am tired easily, go to bed early, etc. Think it has something to do with having lived on sugar rich diet(alcohol) for so long. "Eating right to live sober" is a great book. Read it a few years back when I quit for 7 years. Started up again as i thought it was no longer a problem. Checked myself into rehab a year ago. They tried to get me into AA and other programs. Saw an addiction therapist. That stuff doesn't work for me because it just makes me dwell on alcohol and not having  it.

Best remedy for not drinking: you get lots of stuff done. Am writing a novel and believe me, it's much easier without the booze. But the tired thing is getting me down. Exercise and lots of greens helps. Going back to getting drunk every day is not an option. Something clicked in my head. I'm off it. Good luck. Best solution, get busy doing something you love to do, or just want to get done. The drinking accomplishes nothing.
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1475202_tn?1388955435
Hi Dave,
I just wanted to congradulate you on your sobriety. It sounds like you have got it figured out now! It has been about 15 months for me and I never tried any of the other methods but for you and I we just got our own way I guess. Hang in there man and again congradulations!

Randy
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Avatar_f_tn
The best way to replenish all the vitamins and minerals,is by the foods we eat. Our bodys synthesize vitamins through digestion of good food much better then supplements. The potency in whole foods is much greater then pills and there is much to be said about eating live nutrients.the absorbtion rate of pill form is extremely low and the quality is poor. Having said the most important thing to replenish is the source in which the vitamins are absorbed, digestive enzymes(pro-biotics). Alcahol (alcohol) has destroyed a lot of the enzymes meant for breaking down fats vitamins etc.. One of the other reasons people gain lots of weight other then the high amounts of sugar and calories. Now that doesn't mean to go out and stock up on activia yogurt. That's just a marketing scheme as they haven taken a grip of the supporting science of the importance of pro-biotics by marketing. You would have to eat a large salad bowl of yogurt a day to see benefits and even then its only a few spectrums, and being that its pasturized its all dead anyway.You can buy quality pro-biotics that have been taken from humans and grown in labs from a good health food store. These are the 2 best things you can do to replenish. Remember withoout the good enzymes to absorb the nutrients   ,its like putting gas in a car with a hole in the tank.
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Avatar_m_tn
I have been an alcoholic for about 17-18 years now. I am now 35. I would be considered a functioning alcoholic I suppose as I work and currently am in the final year of a master's program as a returning student. The problem is, I drink at least 6 days a week and have at least 5 drinks for 4 of those days and maybe 15 the other two with friends. I have contemplated stopping for about 2 years now, but to no avail. Can someone tell me a success story about how they quit and if they needed help to do so? Thank you.
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1886897_tn?1328331136
Wow! This took off in a whole different direction that I thought it would...

My name is Jim, and I am the one who originally started this post; where I was going is that this is my first attempt at sobriety in 20+ years (I am on day 45), I went through detox which was a piece of cake, but now everyone is on my case to go to AA meetings, which I am not comfortable with. I know my family cares and loves me and I appreciate their concern, but I need them to back off a little. How to I say that to them after all they've done for me?

Is there anyone out there like me that truely wants to quiit drinking without going to AA?

Is there a forum for that?
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1886897_tn?1328331136
My apologies, I posted my reply to the wrong forum; hop I didn't offend anyone.
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Avatar_f_tn
my friend isnt ur typical drinker but hes at a stage of his life wher he has been on the drink for the past 5 days ,none stop and its.the hard stuff ,he wont eat either he is out of it since he drinks ....then after 6-7.days he stops drinkin then has to go through the been sick all the time and head aches, shackes ...... but when he comes off the drink he can go 6-7months with out drinking so i just dont get it... hes tried most things like the groups even hypnosis.! any1 any ideashes on antidepressents too
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Avatar_f_tn
my friend isnt ur typical drinker but hes at a stage of his life wher he has been on the drink for the past 5 days ,none stop and its.the hard stuff ,he wont eat either he is out of it since he drinks ....then after 6-7.days he stops drinkin then has to go through the been sick all the time and head aches, shackes ...... but when he comes off the drink he can go 6-7months with out drinking so i just dont get it... hes tried most things like the groups even hypnosis.! any1 any ideashes on antidepressents too
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Avatar_f_tn
AA has been a big help to many of us here....today i am 28 years sober/clean....and AA helped in that.I needed sober/clean ppl to associate w/and role models that this could be done as well as living xamples of recovery.I could not have achieved that sitting alone in my apt.w/my siamese cat in 1983!So u choose not to go to AA?Fine!if this forum is not enough for u then it would be wise to find some type of support group you could attend....there are alternatives like Rational Recovery and SMART which is an offshoot of RR.Many find support through a church or sober activity.And if u choose not to go to support groups with humans then this may have to suffice!
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Avatar_f_tn
glad you are coming to the idea of stopping. I am now 56 and had been drinking and smoking for most of my adult life. I went to NLP (Neuro-linguistic Programming) and it worked wonders, I stopped smoking 1 year ago and alcohol approx 7months ago. all without medication or any stress about missing either of this. the only effect I still have is tiredness, but from what I read this is a passing phase. Find a NLP practitioner in your area, It only took 1 session for me for each addiction from ALAN CARR . It was worth the money
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hey i wanted to write to you because you seem somewhat similar in the problems you had.  I am very active including being a distance runner, biker, and i work in the fire service but I admit that I like to drink alot and often.  Mostly with friends who like to do the same.  I tried to stop drinking cold turkey which was not so difficult but I immediately noticed a huge decrease in my energy no what I ate I could not find energy. I felt miserable while doing a training drill one day like I never felt before.  I then thought well the only thing could be my change in drinking so I started up again to see if it made a difference and it seemed like I felt normal again.  I really want to stop drinking but Im afraid since my job does not allow for time to heal and be without energy.  I am a new fireman and cannot take off time yet and really dont want to. Any suggestions you have would be great. thanks.
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came on this site to see why I felt so tired, having stopped drinking.  I was drinking way too much - everyday, bottle of wine plus.  I still managed to get up for work at 7 and never felt hungover.  Now I feel a wreck - I am on day 7 with no booze.  I can harldy keep my eyes open at work but sleep restlessly in bed, waking almost every hour.  I am guessing this is normal as my bod chemistry reajusts to not have booze in me.  Good to know others out there managing, and have done it for longer than me - so will keep on going.  The person going on holiday has me thinking about my week away in May with my hard drinking boyfriend and how I will manage that?  How will I manage that?
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You are right about the sleep problem. It is one of the with drawals but it wont last and you will be sleeping normal again. Congradulations on your choice of sobriety!

Here is how you handle the BF thing. Let him know that you have stopped drinking. He should be very proud of you and supportive. IF not then I would think he's not much of a boyfriend and maybe you should look around for someone that will care and be supportive. Having the support of our loved ones is key to successfully quitting and managing this disease.

Also just because you quit surely does not mean he is going to. Are you prepared to accept that? An alcoholic does not quit because other people want them too, they may try but rarely will it last. They quit when they are ready for whatever that reason may be.
Randy

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thanks for your post

good advice re BF, and my sleep is getting better, so fingers crossed for another sober week.....taking it one day at a time.
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Yes there is a way to quit without AA.  Its called the 12 NON steps and its for people who have a brain and can think for themselves.  Its based out of California and is expensive, but just reading about what they say on the site will spare you a religious based AA program that doesn't work for a lot of people.
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I hope you are doing well, how are things going for you?

ericramu- You should show respect for those who have used AA as a tool to maintain their sobriety. Your comment is unwelcomed and has been reported. Apparently your brain didn't allow you to think that post out before making it!

Randy
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Hi I quit smoking with Allen Carr - was truly amazing. After 20 years of tryoing to quit I never thought some could possibly make a difference or add anything I had not already thought of.

I don't get it though - Allen Carr is not NLP correct? I would love to see an NLP mutual support group - ie you dont pay them all just NLP practitioners getting together and working on improving skills. Have you ever heard of such a group?
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I have stopped drinking and have heard there is a andriod app that counts the minutes,hours,days,months, years you have stopped drinking, anyone know where i can get it ???

Andy
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I dont know about your android app but medhelp does offer "Tracker." See below. Congradulations on your sobriety. In the begining it's fun to count every last minute but as it becomes less and less of a challenge for you then you will begin counting the days then the months and eventually the years.

You will find you have your life so much more together than ever before and you will become very self-confident!

I think this is the app you are looking for..

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.voilaweb.mobile.sobrietycounter&hl=en

Take care,

Randy
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hi everyone my name is robin i quit drinking over 6 months ago.im 41 and living with high blood pressure and anxiety&panic attact as well i used to be on clonazopam med for anxiety attacks but i had stopped taking them and now im on elavil to replace the other ones.making my story short when i was in high school i used to weight lift and be in supper shape but i was always an hypertensive person i had lots of endurance and now im trying to feel better any sugestions what i should do so i can feel better. thank you verry much appreciated
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Hi Robin,

Congradulations on your sobriety, 6 months is great and no easy task for many of us!

Are you taking any blood pressure medication and how high is it? How well Elavil working for you? Your blood pressure rises and falls naturally throughout the day, and can be affected by stress, anxiety, exertion, alcohol and food intake, amongst other things. It is quite possible that your anxiety is one of the underlying reasons for your high blood pressure.

I dont know the severity of your conditions to be able to recommend some cardiovascular exercise or weight training. Your doctor would be the only person qualified to answer your question.

I must also tell you that Clonazepam is in a class of medications called benzodiazepines and its possible that withdrawals are the cause of you not feeling well. It may take a few weeks for the Elavil to take full effect at which point your doctor may increase you dosage if it isnt working well for you.

Once you your blood pressure is controlled I see no problem indulging in exercising to get back into shape but remember to first consult your doctor. For now it sounds like you just need to give it more time.

Randy
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Hi,

i have beem alcoholic for about 30 years. i have started getting pains in my liver (i think) like a bubble expanding inside. this has spread to my left side too. i have only had this pain since being on blood pressure/cholestorol/aspirin medication. i dont drink much beer usually bourbon and red wine. i dont usually get the pain from bourbon but the red will guarentee it. is this pain (because it has spread) liver or pancreas related? and what can i do to stop it? i have no pain in my back/kidney area and all tests have come back ok
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Hello Sarge and Welcome to MedHelp. 30 years sure is a long time drinking. It would be hard to imagine that your liver is still in a healthy condition but not impossible. How much do you drink? What type of testing was ran and was blood work taken also? To determine the condition of your liver a complete metabolic panel and a CBC (compete blood count) is the necessary blood work needed. If your doctor is aware of how much and how often you drink then he/she probably would have ran this type of lab work. If not then it may have been over loooked.

Have you given any thought to stop drinking? I don't know what is going on since more testing is needed but I can tell you this. Most people with cirrhosis will not develope symptoms until they have reached the final stage. So you can understand why its so important for you to have the appropriate testing done to find the source of the problem. Once the appropriate testing has been ran you doctor may send you to a gastroenterologist (a specialists dealing specifically with the digestive system). I hope everything turns out fine for you please let me know how things are going. Take care.

Randy
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thanks for replying Randy. i usually drink a bottle of red per night mon-thurs and a couple bottles of bourbon on weekends. i was diagnosed with high blood pressure and had tests for liver function, cholestorol, diabetes, bloods. all were clear except my LFT came back high and vitamin d deficiancy. He prescribed olmetecp;us 20/12.5mg, crestor 10mg and aspirin 100mg (i also smoke). i had follow up tests and all were ok except liver again, still high but he didnt seem too concerned when i told him i was drinking the night before the test. My pains started after i started medication. does any of my prescriptions also affect the liver also?
Any comments would be appreciated.
i havent had a drink today and will have a break i think

cheers
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This is very odd to me that your doctor would prescribe Crestor after seeing you have elevated liver enzymes. Listed below is something I took from our government website concerning this drug:

RECOMMENDATION: Healthcare professionals should perform liver enzyme tests before initiating statin (the type of drug) therapy in patients and as clinically indicated thereafter. If serious liver injury with clinical symptoms and/or hyperbilirubinemia or jaundice occurs during treatment, therapy should be interrupted. If an alternate etiology is not found, the statin should not be restarted

You may read all about the dangers of Crestor by following this link:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0000242/

Do you know what liver enzymes were elevated and what they were? I imagine ALT and AST certainly were due to the amount of alcohol you are ingesting daily. Crestor is a drug commonly prescribed for patients with high cholesterol since you don't have a problem with high cholesterol then I would certainly get to a different doctor for a second evaluation!

Also an Aspirin is fine for anyone with a healthy liver but should not be taken by anyone with poor liver function nor should any other pain medication.

Good you are taking a break from the alcohol today but you should know that it can take months of sobriety for your liver function to return to normal. To continue drinking in this manner you may eventually find yourself trouble. Your liver has an amazing ability to heal itself  but excessive amounts alcohol kills liver cells quicker than they can be replaced. This causes scaring, a mild degree of scaring is referred to fibrosis and more severe scaring is called cirrhosis. This is the position I find myself in these days. I hope you will be careful and allow adequate time for your liver to recover. A full recovery is possible and can only be known with lab testing. Seek a second opinion from another doctor concerning your medications and be very specific about how much you are drinking. This will help your doctor understand the best way to treat your condition(s) with testing and while prescribing medications. Do not discontinue taking any prescribed medications without consulting your doctor first. If you decide you would like to give up drinking read some of the other posts here in the group and learn about the methods others are using. You should be aware that stopping “cold turkey” can lead to serious side effects and in rare occasions seizures and even coma.

Randy

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I have found this forum and  comments really interesting and helpful, so thanks to everyone for your comments and for your honesty. I am particularly reassured to hear about the side-effect of tiredness experienced when giving up drinking, as I also suffer from this terribly.

I am a 41 year old male (UK), married with two young kids and all the ingredients around me seem good/secure/happy - no worries, great relationship, no money problems etc. Even better, I work from home and have quite a flexible regime.

So, to break up the day, for several years now I have been opening that first beer of the day progressively earlier - it used to be 7.30-8pm and, more recently, I would pour myself a large glass of Chardonnay at around 4.30pm....and would get through the first bottle of wine before even sitting down for dinner. My wine glasses are so big that a whole bottle only fills my glass twice, so it doesn't feel like all that much...what a great way of justifying it!

In starting to drink earlier, this has given me more time to drink greater quantities of alcohol of an evening, coupled with increased tolerance of alcohol over time. Typically I would get through maybe a bottle-and-a-half of wine per night as well as a handful of beers....clearly too much, and going on for too long. Luckily I have not progressed onto spirits although I do like the odd G&T.

It started to worry me a little when I got to the stage that I could meet a customer, perhaps an unscheduled meeting, at say 8pm, having already had a bottle of wine, and hold a totally coherent conversation and carry on business a normal - that has caused me some concern. The average person would be slurring and possibly uneasy on their feet after a whole bottle - it doesn't even remotely affect me like that any more (if it did, I'd obviously drink less).

I think my 'kind' are referred to as being a 'functioning alcoholic' as I never skimp on any of my obligations and I actually wake up earlier and with more energy after my normal nightly quota of alcohol than I would otherwise do with no drink at all. I took the view that I functioned better with alcohol overall, but was always mindful of having a young family and kept in the back of my mind the hidden damage I might be doing to my general health & inner workings.

I've not had my blood checked and have not experienced any pain or discomfort, but have nonetheless decided to stop drinking for a while and see how I get on. I always stop drinking in January for a whole month and quite often go through February & March before starting again. The problem with this is over-compensating as a reward, and I therefore often end up drinking more than I was before. Also, in the UK at least, booze is being progressively promoted more and more agressively in supermarkets, or maybe I am just noticing it more? There's always temptation. It's everywhere!

I have tried moderation but, unfortunately, this is just no fun at all. I would rather not drink at all than to moderate. I simply can't have a glass of wine over dinner....I want the whole bottle, and them some more! A good wine really compliments a good meal, but I just wonder if I have overdone it all and stretched it beyond just simple enjoyment and have moved into a potentially 'darker' area...I think a lot of people get to this crossroads and have to face up to it and decide what do to about it at one point or another.

I've not had a drink this week so far. It's not much of an achievement, as it's only Tuesday. I do have the discipline to stop pretty much whenever I want, even though I find it fairly difficult, not to mention boring.  I use my occasional breaks from alcohol help me to justify my continued drinking, as I can't possibly be an alcoholic if I stop for a few days here and there, can I?

The one thing I'm reassured to read about in this forum is the tiredness and fatigue being experienced by other people who are giving up alcohol - I am absolutely knackered, and it's very hard to stay positive with a firm sense of resolve when energy levels are so low. I guess that's just one of the tests/demons which will separate the success stories from the failures. Good luck to anyone who feels too far gone with alcohol to go back...it's a heck of an achievement to give it up completely.

Every time I stop drinking, I not only stay in bed for around 10 hours a night, I am also take a 45-60 minute nap around 3-4pm most days. This does feel terrible - a good night on the wine would create an immediate short-term fix to this, but I think I'll stretch this one out a bit further this time and see how it goes.

I'm not giving up drink just yet - not completely. I have no intention of doing so. I think it would be a shame to let my reckless/thoughtless abuse of alcohol entirely spoil my future enjoyment of it so my intention now is to just go with the flow and just try to live sensibly from day to day, and not to let the odd 'blow-out' change my view too much.

If I find, in the future, that I am unable to moderate then I suppose I will give it up completely, but I can't help but think that this would be a shame....is giving up alcohol completely really the only way?

If I'm honest, I am still on the fence rather than the wagon!
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I'm glad u've found this forum interesting and helpful and have garnered much food for thought!i tried........and failed miserably...at being a social and recreational drug user......from age 14-28...i'm fortunate my drug addiction made me physically ill for it brought me to my knees at age 28 to accept my other addiction to alcohol.None of us who have recovery stopped cuz it was a good idea......we stopped for we were miserable because of our use...we were sick n' tired of being sick n'tired!I appreciate your honesty...respect it too....you will either succeed...or fail at controlled use.....and then find ur own answer!
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Al it sounds like you have a good plan. I'm glad you are being cautious since you know this can potentially turn into a very big problem. Your on the fence and determined to go through with taking a break so there really isn't much advice I can offer since my good friend Ibizan said it perfectly!

One thing that I want to make sure you know is that rarely will a person with liver disease have any symptom until they are cirrhotic. At this point there is no reversing the damage. Stages of fibrosis are completely reversable by way of diet and abstinence. So routine lab work (annual check-up) is important to catch any problems early.

I hope the best for you and your family. take care,
Randy
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I've completed a fortnight without any alcohol now, with the exception of last Friday/Saturday when I had a bottle of wine each night in an attempt at moderation (like most sensible folks!). I looked forward to that Friday/Saturday so much that I have decided to go the whole of this week with no alcohol at all, which I have done successfully. It may have even been a little easier for me this week, as I did not have to contend with the anticipation this time around. If I covet the weekend drinking nights too much then I end up wishing the week away, which cannot be good!

I'm still tired. I'm still unhappy about being in this situation, but my history of drinking is relatively minor compared with many others on this forum, so I'm glad not to be in too deep before getting a grip on the situation. I'm into this enough though to at least have some level of appreciation of what some of you others are going through, albeit on a much reduced scale. I therefore count myself to be very lucky indeed. I also sincerely wish each person on this forum every success with their own remedies as you all seem to be such a frank, honest and well-wishing bunch of people. Good luck to you all!

It's regretful that moderation does not seem to be an option for me (or any of us by the looks of things) as I only end up anticipating the drinking nights too much and then having to regulate the quantity of alcohol to a 'normal' level just ***** the fun out of it. I think I will be happier in the long-term if I just don't drink at all (not to mention healthier!). I had hoped that moderation could be an option but, for the moment at least, it is not.

Benefits so far: sleep seems to be getting a little better, although I am still running out of steam late afternoon as well as spending ten hours per night in bed. I am not sweating excessively any more (I thought it was just me, but this has stopped completely after a week of not drinking) and I guess I've saved a bit of money which I would have otherwise wasted on booze. Ironically though, I am craving cakes and chocolate in the evenings which is unlike me - maybe a sugar replacement for alcohol? The other thing I find is that I 'crash' about 20 mins after eating a load of chocolate - I literally pass out (only for half an hour to an hour) - has anyone else experienced this? I wonder what can explain this! I thought sugar was supposed to give you a boost!

It's miserable here in the UK at the moment - the weather is terrible, there's floods everywhere, the economy is disastrous and now everyone in the city is panicking about the Olympics & all the security....a great time to crack open a beer and let it all go over my head, but I shall settle instead for a freshly squeezed orange juice and my Sunday paper, coupled with some of the most boring television I have seen in years.....hopefully this will help me sleep better tonight!

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Hello BigalUK

Good god tell me about it I live in the North of England, Yorkshire Dales and I don't think I can remember a worse summer! Plus my boyfriend works for G4S so we are fed up of hearing the news hahaha! Very well done for recognising you have a problem with alcohol before you got to far down the line! I tried to moderate my drinking and yes it is no fun at all! I used to have constant battles going on in my head, so finally I accepted I could not drink without serious consequences and do you know what I don't even miss it one single bit! I can honestly from the bottom of my heart say that I am happy and feel great, never have to wake with a hangover, am financially better off and can go out for meals, to pubs and parties and be happy drinking tonic water, ice and lemon.

I just let go of the belief that one day I may be able to drink sensibly and once I did I found I was at peace with myself, something I have never felt before :-) Oh yes the sugar cravings, it is perfectly normal as you know alcohol is full of sugar. When I first stopped drinking I was in such pain and had a very intense craving but as I never ate sweet things really I had no idea what it was all about, then I found chocolate oh god hahaha! I'm not sure about falling asleep straight after a sugar rush, have you been checked for diabetes? I don't know if that could be a cause or your body just gets tired from processing lots of sugar, I feel like that if I eat lots of carbohydrates.

Well you have a UK friend now on this forum who can emphasise with shite on TV, terrible weather and the Economic downfall! There are also lots of lovely people on here who helped me emensley when I was struggling and feeling lonely.

Good luck BigalUK and keep in touch :-)
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P.s this is an old thread, perhaps you can start a new one or post your response under my post entitled My Success So Far, it's just easier for other people to see, I will keep an eye out for you :-)
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Wow I'm so glad I found this site.  I was wondering why I am so tired all the time now that I have stopped drinking.
At first it didn't occur to me it was because I stopped drinking, but I asked the question and got all these feed back.
I have 2 weeks sober now and hoping it will be forever
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i'm glad ur here 2!don't view it as 4 ever......its all one day at a time...one hour at a time!
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Hello, well done for 2 weeks sober, despite the tiredness it feels great doesn't it! :-)
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I am so happy to find this site.  It is so helpful to read the information and feelings from everyone here.

I am sober for 14 days now and very happy but also so tired.  I had been drinking beer about 6-10 almost every day.  I would start drinking early in the morning.  Not the usual way of doing that as I jog/walk for 8 miles each morning done by 8:30 then ready for my first beer. Other than this beer addiction I am actually a health freak...figure that one out.  Don't drink hard liquor once in awhile wine.  But this has gone on too many years and nothing good has ever come of this lifestyle.  It became like this within the past year or so.  Prior to that I did about a six pack most evenings. Through the years I smoked some pot but have not for awhile. I had been seeing this guy that our life revolved around partying and things seemed to escalate after we broke up.  So now that I have had a bit over a year to get past that, I am so ready to not be high.

Anyway I do feel great..luckily had none of the withdrawal symtoms (symptoms) that some of you have experienced other than the tiredness.  I quit very easily also, which was a surprise to me.  I think my addiction may be more mental than physical....

Anyway thank you all for the great information.  By the way I am a 56 yer old female.

Good luck to everyone.
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I am so happy to find this site.  It is so helpful to read the information and feelings from everyone here.

I am sober for 14 days now and very happy but also so tired.  I had been drinking beer about 6-10 almost every day.  I would start drinking early in the morning.  Not the usual way of doing that as I jog/walk for 8 miles each morning done by 8:30 then ready for my first beer. Other than this beer addiction I am actually a health freak...figure that one out.  Don't drink hard liquor once in awhile wine.  But this has gone on too many years and nothing good has ever come of this lifestyle.  It became like this within the past year or so.  Prior to that I did about a six pack most evenings. Through the years I smoked some pot but have not for awhile. I had been seeing this guy that our life revolved around partying and things seemed to escalate after we broke up.  So now that I have had a bit over a year to get past that, I am so ready to not be high.

Anyway I do feel great..luckily had none of the withdrawal symtoms (symptoms) that some of you have experienced other than the tiredness.  I quit very easily also, which was a surprise to me.  I think my addiction may be more mental than physical....

Anyway thank you all for the great information.  By the way I am a 56 yer old female.

Good luck to everyone.
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Trina that is wonderful news, congradulations on your sobriety! 8 miles every morning and 56 yrs old, I'm impressed!!! Welcome to MedHelp and hang in there, I have no doubts you can make it :)

Randy
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I now have 3 weeks sobber and I feel OK, not as tired as I use to be a week ago.  But I find myself being agitated and easily annoyed with everything. Man I hope this goes away soon.  I kinda feel like my fun has been taken away from me.  What is there to look forward to?
In any way, being sober sure beats getting up everyday with a hangover.
I was drinking at least a pint of Vodka every night for about 10 years, with just a few nights in between not drinking.  To my surprise I'm not really freaking out without it.  I just feel somewhat bored at night, I was so use to drinking, I guess I should try to keep busy with something
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Hi Shari!
This is my third time coming to your post and reading it but then I get side-tracked and have not sent you a reply. Lol
Congratulations on your sobriety, it's such a gratifying achievement! I quit drinking about 2 1/2 yrs. ago and I recall feeling the exact same way, just kind of lost and didn't know what to do with myself. I drank my a** off for 20+ years and then got cirrhosis. What a kick in the pants that was! Lol
You are on the right track, finding hobbies you enjoy, go out do things with your loved ones that you never took the time to do before since you were busy with the drink. Make a nice meal or snack to treat yourself. Oh and send me some! ha ha
The agitation and feeling of being annoyed will dissipate in time, it's part of the withdrawals and/or part of reality you may need to change some things to your liking. I notice I pay much more attention to the little things in life than I ever did when I was drinking. When I drank I just let it go and didn't care. Now that I’m sober I want my world to be perfect because I have nothing better to do but focus on making my life better :) That I believe is a good thing!
I noticed the 810 you attached to your user name. I wondered if that has any significance to perhaps your area code? I grew up in the 810 so I was just curious. Anyway I hope this post can help you out. Take care and keep doing so great!
Randy
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Hey everyone
I just ordered 3 books that were suggested on these posts.
"The easy way to quit drinking, Sober and staying that way, Eating right to live sober."
I hope these readings will give me eye opening news.  After all I have been abusing my body and soul for some time now.
Still tired in the early afternoon.  Maybe I can find something in these books that will give me a little more energy.
Really want to stay sober this time, not too easy getting up in the morning for work at 7 after a pint of Vodka last night.  That was just about 4 weeks ago.

And rpooo
The #810 has no significance.

Stay helathy and sober
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I am 42.  Have been drinking somewhat heavily since I was in college, with stops along the way.  About 12 weeks ago, stopped drinking for two weeks, then became a moderate (about a glass of wine a night).  What precipitated the end of my extreme relation to alcohol (vodka every night, maybe 5-7 drinks) was feeling tingly and itchy, symptoms that have gone away.  I am fit (marathon runner) and have always eaten well and taken my viatmins.  

Now, however, as healthy as I've ever been, I feel so damn tired at night.  I sleep ten hours and when I wake up, I'm still a little sleepy.  

I do have bursts of euphoric energy and happiness throughout the day, and can only hope that they are 'shout outs' from an emerging healthy liver.  

This board/forum has been great.  THE BEST I have found, and I have read them all.

Thanks so much and good luck to everyone!
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PS  Have any other heavy drinkers, after embarking on withdrawal, suffered from:

• mild paresthesia (ulnar nerve compression; hands only, nights only)
• deep ten-hour sleep followed by drowsy mornings
• mild dry mouth

Granted, i have been hitting Starbucks pretty hard!  I wonder if my blood sugar levels (without booze, and i also quit candy) have been thrown for a loop???

Thanks to all!
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Thank you for your information and insight. I was sad to read about your condition and hope only the best for you.
I am sober 8 days and found this forum just by googling "why am I so tired..." so hurray for google!

Have also lived many years as a drinker...trying to moderate. Came to my conclusion when my 14yr old looked at me with sadness in her eyes after I "sneakily thought" she did not know I had polished off an entire bottle of wine while making dinner.  I have had many "tricks up my sleeve" and fooled myself for a long time.

After reading I saw myself in a few of these entries. It helped me to accept where I am.

I come from a family of drinkers. I began at 12 or 13 and honestly can't recall not drinking (accept for my pregnant days) it was never a question then. And that was the most peaceful time in my adult life.

I am 47 and in good health so I am committed to be good to myself...now.
You are never to old to recreate yourself!
I am not involved in a support group yet...but may seek it out eventually.
I do believe in "one day ay a time" because literally each day is different....with challenges...good and bad.
Thank you for being here.

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Wrote a note to you but addressed it randy...meant for ....you
Whoops
Anne
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Sounds like you are self-aware, self-honest and motivated to change.  I hope your fatigue disappears (it will) and that you will enjoy the freedom of no more tricks up the sleeves!
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Im glad you found our group and welcome. I love seeing people take the initiative to change their life and the support here as you said is unlike anywhere else. I found this group just a few months after I stopped drinking 2 1/2 yrs ago and have been here ever since! I think it's a requirement set by our community leader (Ibizan) that once you post you can never leave! ha ha There's some kinda song about it I think.

Anyways enough joking, when reading your post only a couple of ideas come to mind, one is depression a common side effect when people quit drinking. This would also lead to the desire to sleep ten hours. The human body only requires 7-8 hours each night. Too much sleep can have the same effects as too little.

My next idea is to get to your doctor and have a complete physical. So much can be told from simple bloodwork. Be honest with your doctor so he/she can better help you. The liver performs over five hundred functions pertaining to the digestive system so as your liver regenerates you can expect to notice changes given time and you will be on track and feeling great! I hope this helps you out. Take care,

Randy
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Thanks, Randy.  this group is definitely an excellent combination of humanity and science, all well-written and well-researched.

i had a physical about 4 weeks ago.  My blood tests came back normal (they didn't take LFTs; unsure why not).  I was frank with my PCP about drinking, my *hypochondriacal* concerns about liver disease.  But as my symptoms are vague, and my liver, apparently, felt okay, I think I was sent on my way.

I was told that the sort of skin tingling I was experiencing was nothing like the intense pruritus that some suffer in advanced liver disease.  

Regardless, I am aware of twinges and itches and dense weird-dream slumber in this new world without alcohol abuse.  

The skin stuff seems to be subsiding, and the sleep is intense!  

I also feel as if I have minor insulin resistance symptoms, as I feel a little bogged down after lunch.  

I feel as if my body is making a switch, and taking its own sweet time, almost as "pay back" for how I treated it :)

Thanks for all of your amazing posts, and I wish you a long, healthy, happy life!  you're going to grow very old, I can tell.  
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Good afternoon Anne. Thank you for writing and Welcome to our group!

Google really is terrific isn’t it! Ha ha I’m really glad to hear your health is good, you are very fortunate after so many years of drinking. There have been times that I’ve thought: Wow, if I only would have quit a month or two sooner what a difference that could have made. The sad thing is that most people with cirrhosis do not develop symptoms until they have reached the “End Stage”. You probably don’t need Google to figure out what that means.

You are absolutely right that you are never too old to “recreate yourself”. Many here have done it and so can you! You are doing it right now! A support group is a very good idea, you will be amazed how much it can help. Congratulations on your sobriety and thank you for the best wishes. I’m sending them right back to you :) You are a smart woman and you seem to know what you have to do, please feel welcome to post anytime you like and keep me updated.
Randy

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Just to introduce myself :-)  I'm an ex merchant marine sea captain (mariner) for the past 20 and recently started a successful business on shore.

I've been drinking nightly for the past 15 years, not more than 2 beers followed by almost a quarter bottle of scotch, sometimes a half bottle but never more.  I controlled it, I never drank more; but recently I had heavy bouts of diarrhea out of the blue and my doctor diagnosed me with fatty liver.  To make a long story short, he's put me on a regimen of vitamins and NO alcohol and I'm finding it hard to say the least.  The strange thing is that I don't have any blood pressure or any other issues whatsoever, I work out at gym 6 days a week, I eat healthy food etc., but I've been feeling so tired and sleepy, I don't know what to do about it.  I've got a business to run and am half asleep most of the time!

Any suggestion anyone can have about that would be welcome and appreciated!

P.S. This forum is awesome, my thanks goes out to all the contributors!
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Welcome!  I am brand new to this forum too.  First: congrats on the fatty liver diagnosis, as it may be a life saver!  It has caused you to cease drinking.  As for the fatigue, diet and exercise will, slowly BUT SURELY, conquer the fatigue.  I have found the little snacks, especially fruit, eaten slowly, across the day, help with managing the intense sugar lulls you are experiencing.  Also, moving around, walking after eating, and staying engaged are helpful too.  I stand at my work desk now instead of sitting.  So, many wholesome snacks, slowly consumed, spaced out across the day, and general physical activity will help while your body catches up.
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Thanks very much for the encouragement!  I always denied having a problem, although deep down I knew the amount I was drinking is not normal.  Am also a cyclist and runner; I just always thought I deserved a couple of beers and and ten shots of whiskey after an event or after the gym.  In fact whilst working out, I would relish the thought of what awaited afterwards; the booze!

In fact it was after a corporate Iron Man competition when I drank 4 beers and almost two bottles of scotch that my symptoms went into overdrive, the right side of my tummy swelled out, pain below the rib cage and runny stomach for days, I knew what the cause was without even having to go to the doctor; it was crunch time.  No more putting off quitting!

I've done just that, been off alcohol for 15 days now.  The first two days were terrible, stiff neck, sore muscles, droopy eyes, sleeping like forever, now just the tiredness and I know it will eventually subside.  I remember the days before university, clear headed, bright eyed and full of ideas; sadly that image of myself seems to be so long ago and so far, far away right now.  But I'm confident that I can and will regain that self assurance once again!

Dangank, thanks for your suggestions - appreciate it :-)
Bill
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I hear you re rewards in a bottle after exercise!  I am a marathon runner, and there is nothing like the high of a cold martini after 26.2 miles!

I always said to myself 'you can't have a problem if you can run that far.'

I was wrong, but I believe that the fitness has indeed staved away more serious implications from drinking.  

As for the person you used to be, that person is still in there.  Once you clean out, not only will the fatigue disappear, but the new ideas and happy visions will return.  

Welcome to your second act!
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It's great to hear you are maintaining your sobriety, this is very important since this is the very first indication of what can turn into liver disease. The wonderful thing about the liver is its amazing ability to heal itself. Liver cells are being killed off with just about everything we ingest into our bodies. In the case with alcohol abuse  liver cells are killed off faster than they can be replenished. This changes the contour of the liver to a rough harden exterior we call fibrosis. After years of alcohol abuse scar tissue is then formed, this is called cirrhosis. A fatty liver and fibrosis are completely reversible with abstinence, diet and exercise.
One of the first things I noticed after I stopped drinking was I no longer questioned who I was or if I was right. As alcoholics we tend to wonder at times knowing that our thought clarity is compromised from the alcohol. This will lead to a tremendous increase in your self-confidence. I wish you the best, take care.
Randy
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Randy; thanks very much for your kindness and input on the subject.  It's true that our thought clarity becomes somewhat hazy after years of drinking.  I only drank after 7pm, so I was no alcoholic haha, I only drank a certain amount, so I was no alcoholic, that's the sort of stuff that used to go through my mind.  Or when I was sick with flu or a cold, I always made up some magical potion out of brandy or whiskey or warm wine and so on.  I had a different alcoholic drink for every ailment you can think of.  I laugh at myself now, but it was serious stuff for me at the time.  I used to think of alcohol as my friend, my buddy during troubled times; only to now discover that each time I had a crisis and drank - I made things worse by doing and saying the wrong thing.  Alcohol is now my enemy, it's a poison disguised with sugar and flavorings, that's all it is!

Feeling much better today, even been in the garden and done things, something I had not done in years!

Thanks everyone for listening to me droning on :-)

Have a good one!
Bill
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Bill feel free to "drone" on and on this is a support group, we love this sh**! lol We enjoy even more hearing you tell about your progress and doing things you haven't done in years hence the garden. Can you imagine how close you were to going the rest of your life with the drink and not really ever finding out how much better life can be without it. As time goes on life just gets better and better. Your self confidence and motivation will increase, you will put careful thought into everything you do not only making you a better person but increasing your quality of life. Until next time Bill take care and I wish the best for you.

Randy
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yesss,sick of waking up at 3 am, 4, 5

@Randy, ty, no liver pain anymore (stopped crestor) and tried to stop :( still drinking but only weekends now, so halved it :)
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I'm in the same boat. I've been free from alcohol for nearly 8 months now and I am exhausted. I've been tested for everything and now been sent to an ME specialist. I know its linked to the drinking but what can I do to help it?
Ive been exercising, gave up smoking too, eat healthily.
Does anyone know if this goes away as my biggest fear is that it won't and the thought of that makes me fear a relapse!
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Whats an ME specialist?ur tiredness will dissipate...mine did after the first 9 months......i really had to watch the caffeine consumption......NONE after 4pm.....and did my best to maintain a diet rich in proteins and complex carbs.......the sweets and snacky foods we crave post drinking cause blood sugar levels to peak...then crash leaving us feeling tired and moody!
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Hello, if you google PAWS Post Acute Alcohol Withdrawal, it states that it can take up to 2 years for your body to get back to normal, read about it as its very interesting and will explain a lot of the things we go through in recovery! I'm 6 months clean of alcohol and my sleep pattern is still all out of whack and I do feel tired a lot of the time. Please don't let this make you relapse, research PAWS it may well give you some answers :-)
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Apparantly my doctor thinks I have ME or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome! He said once they've tested for everything else, ME would be the next step. Therapy etc which I know isn't what I have but try telling the doctor that! Theres still such a stigma with alcoholism. People think, even doctors, that if you're young and still working, you can't possibly be addicted!
Thank you for your advice!
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Hello,
Thanks for your note. I am 14 days on the road to sobriety!
I am feeling better. Started taking B complex along with my usual
Vitamins and am feeling less tired every day.  

Anxiety has always been a little bit of an issue for me so
I am paying attention to the triggers.

My husband is very supportive but doesn't really get what I am
Going through. Which is why I really appreciate this forum.

I'm surprised by the fact that I don't really know anyone in my circle of friends that doesnt drink. Maybe I shouldn't be surprised...ha ha...on me!
My brother (interestingly enough) has been a recovering drug/alcohol addicct
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Whoops...
For almost 10 yrs!
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Thanks for the advice. I've looked into PAWS and you're 100% right. Sounds like everything I'm feeling, especially the tiredness and headaches. I just assumed that all these symptoms would be gone after a few months. Atleast now I know it's not anything else. I'll have a good look into diet to see what I can use to give me an energy boost. Would you have any advice for anything to assist a rocket in tiredness mid - day?
Thanks again. This forum is so helpful. I've not had any help with the drinking or quitting so its so good to know that people feel the same.
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Hi,

I found that a combination of milk thistle extract and grape seed extract capsules, as well as a good multivitamin and B complex seem to help a lot.

Midday tiredness is a problem for me too, but since I started gym again it seems to be getting less and less.  So, what I do is when I start feeling droopy I force myself to the gym, it works wonders.  I still cant get over the stiff neck I get from time to time, but I'm sure it will subside as time goes by.

Keep doing what you doing and I wish you the best :-)
Bill
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Hello Anne,

It is good to hear from you and a terrific update! Thats great your husband offers his support, it can play a  large role in your recovery. Are you very close with your brother, you too could cetainly help each other.

How has the last 14 days been, I think by now you must feel like you have a pretty good handle on it. I never really kept many friends but I have one friend that still loves to party but we always have a good time and for me there is never any temtation. After so many years of drinking we kind of have pi**ed off all of our sober friend probably .. ha ha

Anyway I'm glad to hear you are doing good, I hope to hear from you soon, Take care.

Randy
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Hello Randy
I've been reading all your comments to all of us and they are so helpful. Thanks so much.

I hope you don't mind me asking, but knowing that fatty liver and fibrosis can be reversable and yet Cirrohsis isn't, what is your situation? I've heard that one can live with it a full life, albeit on medication. What is life like with Cirrohsis?

I ask all this not because I have it, although goodness as you have stated one never really knows since there are practically no symptoms, but because I haven't read anything about someones life with it.

I've just turned 50, drank most of my life but the last ten years heavily. On my 50th I said to myself..hey, sean...enough is enough, you have had your fun, got loads of daft memories, but now its time to have a different life without alcohol. I'm on day 5 and like many others on here, feel so desperately tired, muscles aches yada yada yada!! All the comments on here have been encouraging about how this can pass over time, relevant to how everyones individual bodies work. I really want this to work, albeit feeling all the usual feelings of loss, regret and those awful witching hours for me between 5pm and 7pm when the demons on my shoulder are screaming "have a drink....go on.......have one...you need one..you deserve one...life is so boring without it yeah?" lol!!

Anyway, not quite sure what I'm leading to..perhaps nothing but...thank goodness I found this forum :-)

sean
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I just found this group, and it seems like everyone is so nice and understanding, and I feel like I'd like to participate.
I just got back from the gyno doc (tmi? lol) and they take your blood pressure just as a standard practice and he got REALLY stern with me.  Now, for a doctor that doesn't specialize in hearts, he was pretty no nonsense.   Apparently my BP is very high and, guess what.. I'm an alcoholic.  Secretly, of course.  I was hungover at the time, but I guess over time alcohol can really mess up the BP.  Now he's making me make all sorts of appointments, even though I know, inside, what the cause is.

I'm 26.  There is still time for me to stop.  But... I'm like, no one without alcohol.  I have social anxiety, and for the past 3 years I've been drinking almost every day, mostly vodka.  It helps, for real I don't want to give up something I love.  I know it is bad for me, but I just can't let go of the "love" of the feeling it gives me... the safety it gives me.  How it makes my fear and fragility virtually disappear.

Even though we know, intellectually, what we're doing to our bodies, why does it take so long to give up the illusion that it's helping somehow?  Has anyone else experienced this emotional letting go?  Does anyone else have social anxiety and faced situations after having quit?

How do I break up with vodka?
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Once there was a caterpillar named Charlie who lived in the Valley of Promises.

There was nothing observably special about Charlie. He was an average looking caterpillar amidst thousands of others. Like them, he spent the majority of his time crawling from leaf to leaf, eating as much as he pleased, & dozing in the warm sunlight. Life was good & Charlie was happy.

As you know, there is something very special about caterpillars. From the time they are born, they are aware that something beautiful beyond imagination will one day occur. It is called The Promise.

Charlie was a believer. For as long as he could remember, he had loved The Promise. Its mystery filled his days & nights with dreams of anticipation.

In this way, Charlie was special, for his love of The Promise by far exceeded that of any normal caterpillar. He grew more & more impatient in his intense desire to receive its gift.

One day, as Charlie was exploring the valley, he was attracted by a bright, shiny object lying in the meadow. It was a brown bottle. The sun's rays danced on the glass & gave it an aura of golden splendour. It seemed to beckon Charlie. Filled with excitement, he hurried as fast as he could go.

Charlie was a bit scared when he reached the bottle, for it was something entirely new & frightening. As he explored it, curiosity soon overcame his fear. He traveled its surface from end to end & top to bottom.

When Charlie entered the bottle, something magical seemed to happen. A soft mellow glow enveloped him in the warmth of a false utopia. After a time, he was lulled to sleep by the gentle voice of the bottle whispering pleasures yet to come.

At first, Charlie spent most of his time leading the normal life of a caterpillar with only occasional trips into the brown bottle. But as the days passed, he longed more & more for the mellow glow it offered & his trips became frequent. He began to venture deeper & deeper into the bottle to find the utopia he sought.

Sometimes, Charlie's friends came to visit while he was in the bottle. As he moved about within its glass walls, he appeared to be different than he really was. Pleased with all of the attention he received, he would do silly things to make his friends laugh. Charlie loved being the centre of attention & his friends' laughter made him feel important. Then, the bottle seemed to whisper, "Charlie, when you are with me, you are a very, very special caterpillar." And Charlie felt, that indeed, what the bottle had said was true.

By the end of the summer, Charlie seldom left the bottle. It had become more important to him than the warmth of the sunlight, more important than the companionship of his friends, even more important than the Valley of Promises itself. He began to depend on the bottle for all of his needs. It had become his home.

With the coming of fall, the world outside the bottle began to change. Cold winds swept down from the north. Green plants turned brown & died. There was a rush of activity among the caterpillars for they knew that they, too, must change with the seasons & prepare for the winter to come.

On the final day of preparation, Charlie's friends went to the bottle & called to him, "Charlie, please come out before it is too late. We must get ready to receive The Promise."

Surrounded by the warm glow, Charlie gazed out upon the barren valley. "I would be foolish to leave this warm, safe place & go out into the cold with you. I could leave if I wanted to, but I would rather stay here." Laden with sorrow, Charlie's friends turned away from him in hopelessness & returned to their tasks.

One day, as Charlie gazed out upon the snow covered valley, the bottle again spoke to him, "Charlie, you have seen your friendssuffer from the cold in their quest for The Promise while you have remained here, warm & safe, with me. Surely by now, you know that I am better for you than an empty promise."

And Charlie knew, that indeed, what the bottle had said was true. On that day, Charlie deserted his belief in The Promise, & surrendered his dreams to the control of the brown bottle.

Winter passed slowly & Charlie lived in a hazy world within his glass confines. During his long stay, he had not eaten or taken care of himself. He began to grow frail & thin. The warm glow was slowly fading. The bottle's walls were becoming cold & uncaring.

On occasion, Charlie tried to reach the bottle's opening in an attempt to again find the outside world. But now the voice of the bottle was cruel & commanding, "Charlie, you cannot leave!" Weak from hunger & filled with dispair, Charlie would slide feebly back into the depths of the bottle. At these times, he would utter quietly to himself, "I could leave if I wanted to, but I would rather stay here."

The mellow glow was completely gone now & there was nothing special about Charlie any more. His good feelings about himself had gradually been replaced with guilt & hatred. He had become nothing more than a sad, frightened little caterpillar, trapped in a brown bottle.

Spring came. The valley was filled with beauty beyond compare. The sky was a rainbow of color as thousands of butterflies tested their wings for the first time in a never ending flight of freedom.

... THE PROMISE HAD BEEN FULFILLED ...

On the day of The Promise,
Charlie died.
Alone,
in silent desperation.
No one knew,
no one cared.
Least of all, the brown bottle.
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You are enveloped in the warmth of a false utopia just like Charlie. You can break up with vodka if you truly want to. Start by talking to your family doctor, be honest about your drinking. Find a support group in your local area such as AA.
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Hello Sean and Welcome to MedHelp.

Thank you for your kind words. I don’t mind you asking about cirrhosis but it’s important you understand there are many people a lot worse off than me. Everyone with cirrhosis reacts differently to the symptoms and the severity differs. I have been diagnosed with Child C Cirrhosis (End stage) by way of Ct Scan. Diagnosis is difficult in the beginning due to inflammation so accuracy is questionable even by way of biopsy. For many years  the diagnosis of cirrhosis felt as though you were passed a death sentence. So first you must come to terms that your life span will be shortened regardless and as you can imagine everyone reacts differently to this. The amount of decompensation will determine which symptoms are present. These symptoms effect physical and brain functions. The severity of symptoms are often life threatening such as Hepatic encephalopathy can cause loss of balance, memory loss, confusion, coma and death. Umbilical hernia can lead to strangulation of the intestine also leading to death. Varices can burst leading to hemorrhaging and death. There are many other symptoms and complications that may occur. At the time of diagnosis there is no handbook or pamphlet given to learn how to live with these symptoms it is critical that each person takes their health in to their own hands to learn everything possible about their disease. After adjusting your lifestyle and taking precautions these more life threatening complication can greatly be reduced but in severe cases unavoidable. You’re right a person with compensated cirrhosis can live many years but eventually the individual will face decompensation leading to liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma (liver cancer).  When researching cirrhosis it is not uncommon to come across the term “the cause is unknown” or “it is unclear why”. Much more research is needed. Many people have found ways to make living with cirrhosis more comfortable and sharing information on websites and support forums life some days can feel quite normal but then there is always something to remind you it’s not. All in all it is still terrific to be alive and sober really living and enjoying every part of my life! I have said many times in this forum “I’ll take my cirrhosis and sobriety any day then to spend the rest of my life in a drunken haze not really living at all!”

Well that was a neat conversation! Ha ha We become so dependent on alcohol we somehow live our life around it, allowing it to control every bit of free time we have. Offering disappointment after disappointment to our loved ones- family and friends. How many times did you not do something because you would rather sit and enjoying the drink spending money you didn’t have or should have spent elsewhere. I use to spend $600 a month on beer that’s a pretty nice truck payment or a lot of clothes or whatever! If you career oriented how much farther could you had gone without the hangover or having a clearer mind to make more confident and accurate decisions. Life is boring because have done nothing for yourself other than drink. It is time to start showing your family who you really are and what you can do. What a great person the real you is! When I first stopped drinking one of my biggest fears was “what if my wife doesn’t like the new me?” HA! I didn’t hardly even know who I was without it. She always could see the real me and that’s what she loved, it’s the drunk me she didn’t like. Have you ever been in a room with someone else and your sober and they are falling down drunk? What did you think about that person. Did you feel sorry for them? You have spent so much time thinking you deserve one but don’t you think it’s some ones else’s turn to see you without one? You owe it to them Sean. I really hope everything works out good for you. Please keep me posted with how things are going and I will be hoping the best for you!

Randy
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Thank you, rod.  That story made me cry, and it's very true.  I think I will be reading it a lot from now on.  I'm still drinking, but that was powerful.  I'm a big believer in children's books, fables, and also Russian novels, and that ranks up there.  I don't want to lose The Promise. (Unless that has some religious connotation LOL.)  

But I think the Promise for me is fulfilling my dreams here on earth... and not to wallow until it's too late.  Thanks, Rod.  
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Hi,
I'm new to this group.  This sentence you wrote really rang true for me:

"Offering disappointment after disappointment to our loved ones- family and friends. How many times did you not do something because you would rather sit and enjoying the drink spending money you didn’t have or should have spent elsewhere. "

God.  That's the last 3 years of my life.  I haven't stopped completely, but this group is so open and helpful.  Thank you for telling the truth in a way we all can understand.  It's a wake up call for me, for sure.
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Hello Verna I used to think I was a nobody with out alcohol. I thought alcohol was my friend, it made me happy, confident, vibrent, funny and intelligent! I loved alcohol and it loved me. We were together for approximately 10 years before the cracks started appearing. Alcohol started to make me unhappy, cry, make stupid decisions, kept me home all by myself and made me hide away. One day I broke up with alcohol, it was really really hard at first as I felt so lost and lonely, I found myself some support and began to talk. I talked and talked and talked for about 3 months and I found that I was not lonely and lost anymore, I was confident enough to talk in front of a group of people, I laughed like I'd never laughed before, I made good decisions, I had found a new happiness and I was healthy!

Please believe me you can break up with Vodka and learn new ways to tackle your social anxiety. I won't pretend it easy because it isn't by any means, but if you put half the effort into stopping as you do into keeping drinking you will make the break. Hang around and keep asking what other people did and what helped them, I for sure will be happy to talk with you. Just one more thing if you would like to stop drinking you will need plenty of support, family, friends, AA, Alcohol Centres any thing that is accessible to you, I for sure could not of done it by myself.

Take care and good luck to you :-)
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What a fabulous post!
Thank you......That made me smile a lot
x
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Glad it made you smile :-)
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Hi all, great forum - really interesting reading the stories and can identify with most. Just wondered if there are similar people to my own situation.

I am 45. I have drunk since I was 16 and have been an everyday drinker, about 3 cans of stella or 3/4 bottle of wine on weekdays and double this from Friday-Monday. I always thought this to be a moderate drinking amount and have always held down a teaching job throughout. I didn't think quitting would be too hard.

I stopped drinking via detox about 8 weeks ago, 2 weeks before my first child was born. I wanted to quit to break my family trend of alcoholism and enjoy my daughter's young days free of any alcoholic haze.

Like many on here though I experienced the symptoms of headaches, neausea, shakiness and lethargy - but these symptoms have persisted and show no signs of going. Really hard as I'm back into teaching again and struggling to cope with that as well as new baby. Thanks to my wonderful wife I can sleep through on work nights whilst she deals with baby and I am sleeping 10 hours (unheard of when I was drinking!) but still feel tired.

Obviously this is increasingly disappointing as I was so expecting to be full of life and energy by now. Instead I am tired, depressed and agitated by the time I get home and struggle to support my wife and baby as I need to.

I am increasingly thinking of returning to drink, simply as I functioned a lot better with it than without it. Has anyone else on here had similar experiences after so long from quitting? I have had blood tests for diabetes etc. Alcohol counsillor thinks it may be medical and to go to doctor. Doctor thinks it may just be exhaustion but apart from having new baby which of course is hard work, I have no reason to be exhausted, certainly no more than any other new parents.

Would greatly appreciate any thoughts or advice from the people on here. Best wishes to everyone trying to get better from alcohol addiction.
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All of us wanted to not feel what u r after years of drinking heavy.....fast recovery vs.years of damaging our central nervous systems w/alcohol!I sure felt what u r feeling....and in time it went away.Google PAWS....Post Acute Withdrawal from Alcoholism.....i believe u will find some answers 4 urself w/this info!
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If you drank that much, in my opinion, there isn't a way you will be able to drink socially. Our brain has memory of the alcohol intake and what our tolerance levels are at the time of quitting. If you started drinking again it would take just as much..if not more to get a buzz...thus, you would probably end up drinking more than when you quit. I learned this in rehab. Just a thought. Hang in there. I am in the same boat.
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U r so right my dear...our brain chemistry doesn't disappear when we stop using...its always wired to be re-ignited again!i was a MISERABLE failure @ social drinking/recreational drug use....which is why i HAD to retire from ALL of it!
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I am a 48 yr old female, who quit drinking 12-27-2011.  I was diagnosed with fatty liver and decided it was way past time to quit.  I  have been on several anti-depressants with no relief.  I cannot bring myself to go to AA as I am in a very small community.  I have promised myself I will never drink again, however I am now a hermit.  I have isolated myself, moved back to my childhood home and don't know what else to do.  Any thoughts would be appreciated.
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do u have children?a partner?things u enjoy doing that maybe fell by the wayside w/the drinking?a churchgoer?activity is a good antidote to depression/isolation!
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I stop drinking wine 1 week ago , I feel so tired
I never felt do lazy and just tired day and night
I did drink a bottle of wine every night for last two years. I stopped cold turkey. I can't drink just one glass I drink till I pass out, I knew it was time to quit,
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I too have stopped drinking after years of drinking whisky and wine.  For the first week I felt terrible, tired, moody, weak, sugar cravings, hungry and basically like a truck had hit me but after the first week it started to improve.  Colour coming back into my face, not so tired, still crazy sugar cravings and still a bit moody but once you read the previous posts and understand that its all part of the process it becomes much easier to deal with.  Thanks for posting its good to know that all of the above is normal (if that's the right word).  I'm going to abstain on Christmas day but I'm really struggling with NYE.  I think I'll stay strong though and leave it be.....  
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I have stopped drinking 5 days ago as well as gone to AA which believe me was scared to walk into a meeting by myself for thevfirst time. The people all were amazing so loving and kind ... I've been to 3 meetings and meeting new friends and people. It's early days yet but no desire to drink and just noticed my body complaining that its too tired to get up... But it seems from reading some of the posts here its not uncommon to feel that way
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Deechy and Digio The holidays are normally a difficult time to try and quit but it sounds like you are both doing great, one day at a time, you will make it!

I hope the best for you both!

Randy
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You are a few weeks ahead of me....as of today it is day 10 and no booze.  Wine, a bottle or two a day for many years, was/is my weakness.  I was doing a search to see if quiting drinking made you tired. The  irritability i feel makes sense but after a day or two or so i crashed.  I am getting vitamins that is not an issue......i expected without hangovers i would feel great....logically i realize after years of drinking that great is not going to happen overnight but i am so tired....are you feeling any better
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Google Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome with Alcohol and u will find some answers......i xperienced quite a bit of what ur describing and then some within my first few months of sobriety!
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Hi there you do not have to go any of it by yourself go to AA in your area you will meet new friends as well as be accepted for yourself as you are. You get to hear how people have manged to stay sober I have been going along only a short period of time but love going and we go out for other things after wards and we all are there fro each other. You need the support of others who have gone before you
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Good for you . I recently gave up alcohol all together after many times trying to stop and then did what you are planning on doing cut back and then get off altogether. It took a year the longest of not drinking was a month now I've gone to AA where I meet so many people like me they are great and we have fun food and fellowship.i look forward to the meetings and they help me stay sober.  I know I can't be a social drinker I'm alcoholic and may cut down for a while and r
Think I've got a handle on it but after a while I'm right back to drinking too inch . All the best with your trying to cut one out at a time .
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I would think after the length of time you have been deinking you can't stop by yourself for long although you have done really well for the length you haven't drunk. Could I suggest going to AA .there you will find people that are just like us and they welcome you with open arms. Will encourage you with their stories of their struggles and successes. It's hard going the first i me but then you will love it
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I stopped drinking on 2nd January this year after 20 years of drinking two bottles of wine/1/2 bottle vodka every night.  I am 48 years of age and am appalled at my drunken antics and embarrassing incidents over those wasted twenty years.  My father died of liver disease due to alcohol at aged 52.   At the time I was in my twenties and never drank.  I started at 28 years and have never stopped or tried to stop for the last 20 years.  It stopped on 2nd due to my young daughter asking if there was vodka in my juice she was about to pick up.  There was!  Well I don't know if I've had it lucky but since I gave up I have never had a craving for it - which makes me guilty for not stopping before.  Only withdrawal symptoms were first three nights sweating in bed and constantly tired.  Thanks to this blog I now know that that will diminish with time.  I think I have had it lucky,  I'm now planning to stop smoking on 1st feb - lets hope it's as easy.   Love to all of you and wishing you a wonderful sober life for you and your families and friends xx
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I finally decided I'm quitting, this is day 7. I'm circling a small calender in my office every morning, not bragging about it to my wife that's for sure. Tried to quit for years. Went to AA about 5 yrs ago and found this blog because I'm so tired. I know it's the withdrawal of sugar. AA says to eat candy, suck hard candy and drink reg Coke. Glad to read so many in the same boat, I know the fatigue will end. When I start feeling better, the Booze Demon will tempt me, NOT THIS TIME. I'm done with this crap. I was down to a 750ml bottle of Chardonnay+ a couple of my son's beers, the micro brewery stuff, WAY too good, every 2-3 days, but this is not working anymore. Son 24, really notices immediately on coming into the house because of how I act.  I'm 62 and like you, Kath, started drinking wine at 28. Was drinking 1.5 liter a day at one time. I'm getting headaches, the Excedrin (migraine stuff) is working for that, but I have no energy. I know it's the sugar-energy I get when drinking that is the addiction, yea, it's the brain activation, we all know that. By the way AA says it's a disease, I never agreed but whatever gets us to stop, religion whatever is the goal. To me, it's an addiction because one sip of wine and I'm donefor. Despite the fatigue, I know I'm feeling better each day, clearer too although I'm foggy. Sleeping is sporadic, but will get better I have faith and my allergies will subside, I know I'm now deathly allergic to the sulfides in the wine, and drinking some 6-8% alc micro beers after the wine is a killer on the allergies, the hops on top of the sulfates. I used Flonase for a couple years so I could keep drinking but completely lost my smell.(common) Stay the course, friends, don't have it in the house, don't take money or creditcard to Riteaid, I'm serious this time, you are too, and we'll get thru this.
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Been where ur at my friend-here r some tips that helped me-cut down on the caffeine and sugary snacky foods....it aggravates the feeling u describe....lots of water,proteins-fish,turkey chicken and complex carbs...whole grains-breads snack crackers,lowfat cheeses.....baked potato-skin on-best part:)fresh fruits,and green vegetables!U stay the course-i did....one hour at a time,one day at a time....29 yrs.ago!pls keep us posted!
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thanks for this very helpful forum...I quit drinking 25 days ago, and was wondering why I am still so incredibly tired all the time.  I just have no energy.  I have monster naps in the daytime when I'm off work, and drag my butt all the time.  I thought I would have a bundle of energy after quitting drinking.  So it's good to read all the responses and see that my fatigue is not unusual.  And I used to dis AA, but my goodness, this time round I am more openminded, and the support, love and genuine nature of the people plus, starting the 12 steps has made an incredible difference to me and this is the longest I've stayed stopped, so I attribute that to AA  
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It sounds like you are an alcoholic, if you don't think so, try some controlled drinking, if you fail, then you are an alcoholic and you will NEVER be able to drink socially again. I have been sober for 11 years and I am always tired, still after 11 years. I have had every blood test, sleep studies, anti depressants, anti anxiety meds and nothing has relieved my tiredness. It's quite frusterating. I did find out that my testosterone was slightly low and vitamin D is low, so I have been taking adro gel for the low T and vitamin D supplements to no avail, although it's only been a month. I don't know what the answer is, I feel I will probably just have to live with it.
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test thyroid?how is ur weight?do u get exercise?lead a sedentary life?
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Great forum:)  I have been alcohol free for 6 days.  When I drank I had no trouble getting to sleep, but would wake many times during the night and felt ok the next day.  But now, I sleep through the night and I am so very tired the next day.  I have to drag myself out of bed, it's crazy.  Also, when I drank I didn't eat and my weight is now 45.6 kilos.  I haven't eaten properly for years and now have no idea where to start.  Food still doesn't hold a big appeal for me, but I want/need to eat.  Any suggestions:)
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i had the same sleep issues in early sobriety...they do resolve themselves the longer u stay sober.for foods....sources of protein...chicken, fish,turkey....whole grain breads and crackers, fresh fruits and vegetables...lots of C found in broccoli, spinach,oranges....and alcohol depletes the body of potassium so bananas,kiwis,apricots......to name a few!and too much caffeine and chocolate can aggravate the insomnia.
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Been 3 months now without a drop. Drank for 20 years daily. I got blood test and no hep B or C, no diabetes, liver function good only thing was cholesterol was high end of normal. My feet were tingling, cold and skin died and peeled. I had B12 injections (depression can deplete B12) and take 100mg of asprin a day to thin the blood (as alcohol thins blood I thought my blood was thickening resulting in poor ciculation). After reducing saturated fats, sugar and having B12 injections and eating fruit and vegetables with exercise I feel a lot better. Now I just have to sort out my head. I drank to supress emotions and now only suffer mild anxiety and depression which I hope will totally disappear as my body repairs itself and I start feeling better about myself.
Full of energy now.
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love to read good news here!do you have a sober support system of ppl?
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No support group. I use my will power and help from my wife of 17 years together for 23. My wife has been very patient with me, the first month was hard, lots of communication (getting our issues out and talking about what is needed from each other). We both gave up tobacco 12 and a half years ago. Said today was the day we would ever have another fag and never have and never craved. The same with my drinking, I said from this day I will never drink again and have not had a drop in 3 months and have had no cravings. I don't know how I do it. I guess if I want something bad enough I will do it. I wish I could have the same power when it comes to my personal feelings/emotions.
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ericramu
  
Mar 04, 2012
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To: phsycodog
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Yes there is a way to quit without AA.  Its called the 12 NON steps and its for people who have a brain and can think for themselves.  Its based out of California and is expensive, but just reading about what they say on the site will spare you a religious based AA program that doesn't work for a lot of people.
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rpooo
  
Mar 04, 2012
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To: 12Tess
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I hope you are doing well, how are things going for you?

ericramu- You should show respect for those who have used AA as a tool to maintain their sobriety. Your comment is unwelcomed and has been reported. Apparently your brain didn't allow you to think that post out before making it!

Randy
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Dolmen I believe this is the thread you are talking about. Nowhere am I implying that you must be an AA member to post. Ericramu was not just stating his opinion he also insulted those who have chosen to use AA. For this he was reported. He has not since posted.

My intentions here are nothing more than to help those who ask. Click on my name and read my posts. BTW I have never been a member of AA but I do not criticize those who use this method. Do whatever it takes!

Have a nice day.

Randy
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To YOU ALL!!!!! this is an awesome experience to read each of your testimonies as i am on my 3rd day no drinking (have quit other x's) and have 2maro off....my alcoholic brain is telling me "its your day off" and I came across this page looking for answer to 1 question...

Thank you All and Stay Strong and God Bless your journey.....

is there a site on fb for US folks to chat?
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I decided to quit drinking about five months ago, I stopped initially for six weeks but was surrounded by other drinkers and eventually capitulated and started drinking again, however after drinking on and off for about two months I realised that the only way for me was never to drink again, I am now in week five and apart from feeling incredibly tired, I am feeling really positive and looking forward to a life without alcohol, I am 50 years old and have been a habitual drinker for 30 years, this is a great forum with lots of good advice and it is good to know that I can share my experiences, and gain knowledge and pearls of wisdom from people that have been through the early stages of sobriety. I would like to wish everyone here success with there alcohol free quest
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I have been a heavy drinker for 10 years. I recently quit (21 days ago) and I feel amazing except for the exhaustion that most people seem to experience. I saw a lot of comments about the excessive sweating as well. I was really reluctant to go to inpatient because I heard they do a Valium detox. I did not want to mask my addiction by obtaining another. so I thought 'what the heck' I can do this. I know it is dangerous, very dangerous. But I had asked my Dr. and he said I would be fine and put me on Tarazadone. My first day sucked! My bf and I could polish off a 5th of whiskey, maybe more a DAY!! It was awful. Shaking and sweating non stop, so in order to feel better, we would have to drink all day long. Not to get drunk, just to feel normal. Well into 24 hours, my skin itched horribly and I had to lay in bed with cold wash cloths to get rid of the sweat. I would take a shower, and I could smell a chemical like formaldehyde. Like, I was being embalmed. 2nd day, same thing. Except I finally got my appetite back. I was happy about that. 3rd day, shakes went away, and a little sweaty, but not so much as having to change my sheets all the time. Day 5, felt normal...although, the itching is still a nuisance!! uggh. It only happens at night when I try to sleep. And, being a bartender...this is REALLy a challenge for me!! I still get the cravings when I have a rough night at work. I am on day 21 of no booze, and so far so good. My mind is clearer, I am focused and organized, I eat 3 healthy meals a day and my digestive system is back to normal. I just wonder how long it is going to take before I get my energy back...and the awful itching is still here. Like somebody is poking me with little pins and needles. This is my story. I thought I would share. I figure people out there can relate. Good luck to everybody! shan.
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Hi there Shan, i spoke with you via private message, and have come back to re read your original comment that I saw.  

First it would be a good idea to copy and paste your comment directly on to the Alcoholsm Forum, at the top right hand side of this page. I believe that you'll get some traffic there, and ultimately be able to make some friends that can support you in your journey.  

Congratulations on your clean time, 23 days now , and counting. I used the larger tracker , and the big pic with the people with their arms raised, never ceases to make me feel good about each and every day I get to have put up there a the top of my profile ~ that i've maintained my sobriety for one more day ! No matter how hard my day goes, if i can go to bed and wake up to another day adding up, it makes it easier. Keeps you accountable too! The more people know exactly your situation , the more accountable you are. The more clean and sober friends you make, that are aware of your clean date, the harder it is to **** can the attempt. It's like we're all in this together. I think it might help you to use the tracker function on your profile page. Let me know if you want to , and have any trouble with it, okay?

I was somewhat worried, when i read that your bf and you were drinking buddies.  You wrote, " My bf and I could polish off a 5th of whiskey, maybe more a DAY!! It was awful. Shaking and sweating non stop, so in order to feel better, we would have to drink all day long. Not to get drunk, just to feel normal."

Since you've said that you and your bf were drinking 13 plus (in order to avoid the shakes and sweats) over the entire day it sounds sounds like your bf has just as much of a problem as yourself, and you have not said anything here about how he is dealing with his problem with alcohol. Ultimately the drinking habits of our significant other (especially if you live together)  do affect us and our sobriety, in one manner or anothe. You mentioned you don't like the smell, but to have someone so close continuing to use indiscrimiately affects our mood greatly I would think. How do you feel about your bf still drinking? Again, i'm asking on line here so that your followers are able to help you the best way that we can (and i believe that you will have followers , when you do end up posting your own question on the forum as we've discussed via private message).

I went to work within 30 days of my finally quitting drinking every day (although i have to admit, when i got to the end of my drinking career, i would black out drinking very little liquor, whereas my tolerance was huge for so many years, in the end ,my tolerance was significantly lowered, below that of the normal drinker). It helped to be so busy, where i was in a position that i had to perform for 10 - 12 hours a day. It' helped that i had no choice. lol After a few months , I was fine and well used to handling my affairs sober. I got real good at minimizing my side effects and concentrating solely on my job expectations. In other words, i did a lot of faking it til i made it.  

I thought i had already posted on a comment here, maybe i did and this is a glitch, and i'll end up repeating myself, lol, but at the risk of not commenting I'll repeat, it's  a whole different story if we are quitting while in the company of a spouse or significant other who is not recognizing his / or her active addiction issues?  Where are you on this point?
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Incidentally, I will , or you can , copy and paste my comment along with yours, so that anyone looking in to your posted quesion, can see how your thread is being played out. thanks. Liz
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This is a very old post, and will be posted directly onto the Alcoholism forum for further comments.
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I hope you're still keeping up the sobriety as I see this was posted sometime ago. Take Magnesium glycinate or citrate. Also read the book...Miracle Of Magnesium. ALL addiction and recovery stems from a Magnesium deficiency.
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Hi did you go back to a moderate drinker then give up al together? I'm 4 weeks in and shattered, must be the sugar effect!
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Hi just seen this I hope you found a support group
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I found "RationalRecovery.org" after not connecting with AA. I immediately felt a relief and am practicing their philosophy, it is helping a lot.
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RR is great stuff!very empowering!so glad u found it!
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I am a 51 year old and I have been drinking for as long as I can remember. I would think nothing of drinking 2 or 3 of bottles of wine a night or a bottle of vodka, so much so I think my body became immune to the stuff as I never felt ill or hungover and had more energy than all of my kids…this has gone on for years, no-one would suspect I am a severe alcoholic, even my own family didn't realise the extent of my drinking!

I stopped drinking a month ago...I can't tell you why, I'd like to say it was a watershed moment but after losing both my parents to alcohol you'd have thought I'd have had one of those years ago! I detoxed at home by myself and it wasn't nearly as bad as I convinced myself it would be…I really thought I would need medical help as I had seen my parents come off the booze several times and I had seen extreme symptoms of alcohol withdrawal in both of them but my main symptom was very severe diarrhoea. One thing I do know (and I hate to say it) but vanity was one of the reasons I wanted to give up the booze…on the surface I looked good for my age but underneath the slap my skin was becoming a mess, especially my nose which I had to secretly 'squeeze' every morning as it was full of puss under the skin! I also had 'lumps' on my face which were starting to spread like wildfire and I knew then that my liver wasn't working properly.

I think I should have been dead a long time ago with the amount I used to drink and the lifestyle I used to lead as a result of the drinking but one reason I was probably still alive is that I was very physically active during the day and had a very good diet and really positive attitude to life in general!

Since stopping drinking a month ago my face is starting to improve considerably, I am losing weight (I now have cheekbones) and I sleep through the night better than I have done in years...something I never did before as my kidneys would ache so much. The downside, so far, is that I am very tired (even after a good nights sleep) but I am hoping this will pass and I also itch almost all of the time. I do miss drinking, I feel 'bored' most of the time without it but I hope this will also pass without having to drink myself into oblivion like I used to!

Good luck to you all, its nice to hear people's stories and realise it is possible to stop drinking! x

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Thank you for your post.  This is my first time posting as I have been in denial for a long time until the last several weeks.  I have been a daily drinker now since 1999 and really picked it up after both of my folks passed away in 2008.  I have been a scotch drinker and am now Type 2 diabetic and have fatty liver.  I have not had a drink for 2 days, and I am feeling the effects right now big time.  

I am not shaking, but have been experiencing night sweats, which I really hate.  I too itch.  Not all over, but particularly head, shoulders and arms.  Never had that before.  I am also excessively tired all the time.  I am overweight (I used to show horses years ago and was nice and thin and in good shape).  I am 63 years old now, and losing weight and getting enough exercise is TOUGH.  I have aches and pains, particularly in my legs.

Given my age, as my days without booze continue on, will some of these symptoms end do you think?
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exercise, get more sleep at night, keep a healthy diet and take vitamins...works for me.
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