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13841903 tn?1432257394
Meds vs. No Meds
I have never been on medication for Bipolar Disorder. I am wondering about what the pros and cons are. And changes it makes to the episodes and such.
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If you have managed your bipolar med free than I would suggest you leave it that way. Trying meds is a never ending cycle for many people including myself. Meds come with a lot of trial an error and side effects for many.
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13415927 tn?1430705118
i totally agree with you crystal...medicating should be a last resort. if you can manage without why add to the mix. its a long and hard cycle getting the meds stable...takes years of ups and downs
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12647080 tn?1432294502
Are you experiencing disturbances in mood and disruption to your life?
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13841903 tn?1432257394
Yes, it's really hard on me. I can get by, but it's hard.
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If your life with bipolar is too hard than it wouldn't hurt to go to a pscychiatrist and try a med to see if it would help. Just remember the meds are all trial and error for most people so don't get discouraged.
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12647080 tn?1432294502
Life doesn't have to be unbearable, the purpose (and blessing) of medication is to diminish as much as possible the overwhelming burden you're feeling. They have allowed people such as yourself to live a normal (or near-normal) life. Adopting a sort of martyr complex stigmatising medication and convincing us that we should be "strong" and have no need for medication is a great danger that only delays the treatment that is capable of saving you.

Definitely see a psychiatrist.
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I found meds where a good temporary break from the struggle, which put me in a space to be able to live without them. I didn't like some side affects of the 3 I tried, but that time of flat affect lowes my mind to rest enough to rebuild my nutritional therapy, CBT, and I now have a network of local bipolar I have formed. That 6 months was my only time on meds, so the long term benefits are unknown to me. I realized that life is hard, some make it look easy, but it's not easy for anyone. Maybe I'm more intense than others, but everyone seems to relate to how I feel to a degree. Surrender and acceptance have been valuable for me, I hope you feel better soon.
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I have been on medication for my bipolar and they have been a real asset to my life. The hardest part was fining the right one as it looks months of up and downs before finding one that actually worked! The biggest downside for me was the degradation of my sense of humour  as it was flattened out but I preferred not being controlled by my bipolar and depression. My recommendation is to go into taking meds with your eyes wide open as it may take several attempts before finding the one that works for you
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If the bipolar is taking over your life there truly are some pros to taking meds, but as many have stated this can a be a hit or miss type cycle.

My mother is bipolar and every couple of years her dose has to be upped, or the medication has to be changed due to her body getting use to the meds she is on. When they have to change her meds it can be scary because she has become extremely suicidal in the past from one med she was on. So, it is a struggle. However I know that since she has been on the meds since she has been dxs it would be hard for her to not take them and be normal.

I was dxs bipolar when I was 13, I am not sure if the dxs was correct. What I do know is I went on meds and became a zombie. I stopped taking the meds on my own at age 15, and looked up ways to control my disorder at home. Exercise is a big one and the right amount of sleep, plus the right diet. I also have read that certain foods can trigger episodes. And others can be comfort foods. I personally would recommend trying some life changes before meds.

But to truly get the best answer you might want to speak a professional...and give them your details....cause each person reacts differently to different meds and even different disorders.

Hope this was of some help...
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