Cirrhosis of the Liver Community
Help! Do my lab tests indicate cirrhosis
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Help! Do my lab tests indicate cirrhosis

Bun 6   normal (6-24)
Creatinine  .56 (normal .57-1.00)
Bun/Creat Ratio  11  (normal 9-23)
Albumin   4.6 (normal 3.5 - 5.5)
Globulin 2.9 (normal 1.5-4.5)
Bilirubin total .7 (normal 0.0-1.2)
LDH 162 (normal 0-214)
AST 18 (normal 0-40)        was 22 on 8/23
ALT  12 (normal 0-32)       was 18 on 8/23
GGT  29 (normal 0-60)
Tests are from yesterday. Ultrasound 8/2012 indicated fatty liver but I don't have "technical" diagnosis.
Concerned because of low creatinine and bun at lowest on scale. Also, ratio of AST/ALT is 1.5.  
I am a heavy drinker but am working on quitting. No symptoms but hypochondriac since I was born!! Please help!!!
6 Comments Post a Comment
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1475202_tn?1388955435
Hello and welcome to MedHelp.

It's not time to start "working" on quitting, the fact is you must. You have your diagnosis and is nothing more right now than a fatty liver but to continue alcohol abuse will guarantee you to move on to fibrosis. Your liver function is fine, AST/ALT are well with-in range. Your kidney function is also excellent. Nothing abnormal about the amount of liver cells dying off either.

I am curious what the lab result were that prompted the ultra sound. Based on these results I would not have guessed you to be a heavy drinker but in my experience you can go from a diagnosis of fatty liver to end stage cirrhosis very quickly and it's a whole different way of life, just trying to survive. Find the strength you need to stop drinking before you end up in this situation. FYI.. In most cases symptoms of cirrhosis do not manifest until the liver has reached end stag. Also check out MedHelp’s alcoholism forum, there are a lot of good people there that have been where you are and would love to help.

Take care.

Randy
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Avatar_f_tn
Thank you so much!  The ultra sound was done because I went in worrying that something was wrong (one of the reasons I drink is because I am a severe hypochondriach (sp) and am constantly worried about one disease or the next. I told them history of alcohol use etc. Upon physical exam all was fine. I did not have health insurance a the time.  The p/a decided to send me for an ultra sound to ease my mind.  Now, I'm wondering what the actual result was,... at the time verbally she said "fatty liver or Hepatitis" so she sent me for a Hep test and it was negative. (I had a liver panel done as well and provided those results in previous post).  I'm reading now that fatty liver on ultrasound could be cirrhosis and fatty liver is MORE likely if enzymes are high while cirrhosis is MORE likely if enzymes are in range. Is this true? Can you have fatty liver without high enzymes? Please know that when I say working on quitting I mean I am but am afraid to go cold turkey without medical supervision. I am hoping for a referral to a Dr. or program to help me with this tomorrow. I really appreciate your response Randy, Thank you!!
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1475202_tn?1388955435
You are very welcome. I’m glad this could ease your mind.

It is possible to have liver disease and normal blood labs. Thing is there is always an underlying cause such as in your case it is likely to be the alcohol.
Here is how it works, the short version I explain to everyone:

Everything the body ingests kills liver cells, this is a normal part of liver function and it is okay because the liver has an amazing ability to heal itself. It heals by replacing the dead liver cells with new ones but when you abuse alcohol you are killing off massive amounts of cells and the liver cannot replace them quick enough so scar tissue is formed. New cells are eventually formed on top of the scar tissue causing the liver to change texture from smooth to course. It also causes the liver to harden and restrict blood flow.  If you remove the cause (alcohol) then the liver may begin to heal as much as possible and the healthy portion of the liver tries to compensate as much possible. It is at this point it is “possible” to have normal blood lab results. Your ultra sound will determine if you have liver disease and your lab tests will determine liver function. Symptoms will determine staging.

Unfortunately for many the “cause” is much more difficult to remove such as with Hepatitis and for those with autoimmune disorders impossible.

You have the power to control which path you want to take, you actually have a reason to be concerned and do something about it. After diagnosis it took me less than a week to taper from 23 beers a day to now maintaining three years of sobriety. What are you waiting for? This diagnosis was given to you August of last year, 6 months ago.

Randy
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Thanks Randy!  I have no symptoms, and can't recall any.  I have realized that regardless, refraining from alcohol is necessary and that is the course I am choosing.  I am hoping to review my ultrasound results from august at my appointment tomorrow. Did you have symptoms before diagnosis?  
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446474_tn?1404424777
I agree with Randy. Your labs are normal.
Bun and Creatinine are at the low edge but not showing and anything abnormal.

From your ultrasound It appears you have Fatty Liver from alcohol.

Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD)

'More than 15 million people in the U.S. abuse or overuse alcohol. Almost all of them -- 90%-100% -- develop fatty livers.

Fatty liver can occur after drinking moderate or large amounts of alcohol. It can even occur after a short period of heavy drinking (acute alcoholic liver disease).

Genetics or heredity (what is passed down from parent to child) plays a role in alcoholic liver disease in two ways: It may influence how much alcohol you consume and your likelihood of developing alcoholism. And, it may also affect levels of liver enzymes involved in the breakdown (metabolism) of alcohol.

Other factors that may influence your chances of developing alcoholic fatty liver disease include:

Hepatitis C (which can lead to liver inflammation)
An overload of iron
Obesity
Diet

http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/hepatology/alcoholic-liver-disease/

Treatment

The foundation of therapy for alcoholic liver disease is abstinence. Patients are often unable to achieve complete and durable alcohol abstinence without assistance, and referral to a chemical dependency team is appropriate. Hospitalization is indicated to expedite a diagnostic evaluation of patients with jaundice, encephalopathy, or ascites of unknown cause. In addition, patients with known alcoholic liver disease who present with renal failure, fever, inadequate oral intake to maintain hydration, or rapidly deteriorating liver function, as demonstrated by progressive encephalopathy or coagulopathy, should be hospitalized.'

Cheers!
Hector
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Thanks Hector!
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