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Root Canal After Crown
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Root Canal After Crown

I had two adjoining crowns last September.  Upper left, 5th from center (and 6th).

The 5th tooth is increasingly tender and sensitive.  There is no swelling yet however.  

I am getting ready for a 3 week family vacation in 8 days.  Do I rush into this root canal thing?  Will it destroy the crown I already have?  Do I wait until there is a more identifiable abcess (abscess)?

My beloved dentist is celebrating his 50th birthday this weekend and is out of contact.

Jennifer
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Avatar_m_tn
You should have the crown checked, preferably by the dentist who iserted it. remember endodontists do root canals, so I would not go see one on your own unless it is an emergency--good chance you'll end up with a root canal procedure. It may be something as simple as a bite adjustment. let your dentist look at it.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you mike, for your voice of reason in your answer to me, and also to others.  

I took a prescription pain killer Friday night and the pain level is much decreased all day today.  I also reached the dentist's office and they will work me in next week.  

This particular crown has been sensitive to changes in air pressure since the beginning, and we had some severe weather here this week that probably triggered the pain.  

Am I right to think the crown will have to come off for the root canal to be done?  I find the crown adhesive incredibly irritating.  
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Avatar_m_tn
it may also be a bubble in the cement--perhaps it was seated after the cement was already starting to set on the mixing pad. It could be many things. Root canal is always the easy way out becasue the tooth itself cant hurt anymore once the nerve is removed. You may want to ask your dentist to remove the crown and place a new tempoorary on the tooth iand see how you do. Did it need alot of "adjustment" before it was cemented?? If so, it probably did not fit on the tooth that well to begin with. Sensitivity is a sign of a malfitting crown. Spontaneous throbbing and ongoing pain with no stimulus is a sign of nerve involvement. You can always get another opinion, which I would encourage if you are not 100% confident in what your dentist tells you. In my experience it is unusual for a healthy tooth that has rceived a crown to need root canal so quickly unless there was deep decay or a large fracture. In those instances I certianly tell patients of the possibility so they are not surprised and confused if the situation arises down the road.
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Avatar_m_tn
PS-- you do not need to remove crowns to do root canals-- a very conservative hole can usually be made right through the crown. If it is to be removed, they are not just "popped off" in most cases. Dental cements are strong, and the crowns usually need to be cut off, which s pretty easy.
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